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Eveverybody says "It's not the camera, it's the photographer."

 
 
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 01:29 pm
But I am looking to you tried and true A2K sages for your opinions.
I am seriously considering buying a Nikon D7000 DSLR camera.
I'm not a professional, but I want quality shots and ease of use...etc
The features offered by the D7000 camera are far more advanced than the D90, which I am also considering, but I'm still kind of on the fence.
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 2,893 • Replies: 11
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ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:02 pm
@nqyringmind,
The saying is true. I know more than a few people with amazing camera equipment who simply can't "see" a good photo.

Others with less advanced equipment take more striking photos. Don't worry about the gear.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:07 pm
@nqyringmind,
In order to really make use of a high end SLR, you have to both know what you are doing and want to take high end, difficult shots. If you are looking for tourist type pictures and shots of the kids one of the simplier cameras will serve you very well. The ones just below the high end offer very large zooms, fast shutter speeds and a decent amount of control for half the price. I've used both and I can't deny how good the high end cameras are but I use my super zoom for most stuff and own a point and shoot for when I want to be a tourist and not lug around a heavier camera.
nqyringmind
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:27 pm
Thank you both for your insight.

To be more specific, I generally shoot a variety of subjects. I like portraits, outdoor events like festivals and concerts and, to a lesser degree, nature shots.
I plan to start shooting weddings for fun and eventually for $$$.
Currently, I have a D80, which is cool, but the megapixels and advanced features offered by later models are tempting.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:29 pm
@nqyringmind,
Be aware that these 2 cameras are both well respected for intermediate to advanced level of photographers; however, they're aimed at a different levels of photographers, and at a different budget. (D7000 is a bit more advanced than D90.)

Nikon D7000 uses 2010 technology, whereas D90 uses 2008 technology. Due to this differing level of technical advancement, D7000 has a 16.2 Megapizel resolution, whereas the D90 has 12.3 megapixel resolution. This higher resolution also yields less noisey images at higher ISO (light sensitivity).

Nikon D7000
16.2 megapixels | 3" screen | APS-C sensor (1.5 times 50 mm lens equiv)
Sells at $1100 (wholesale)

"Although ergonomically, the D7000 is a very close match for the D90, its overall 'feel' is considerably more serious, thanks to a magnesium alloy body shell and slightly thicker rubber coating on the hand grip and rear of the camera. At 16.2MP the D7000 offers the second highest resolution of any Nikon DSLR, behind only the 24Mp D3X. All of these pixels are packed onto a newly developed CMOS sensor, which offers a 'standard' ISO span of 100-6400, expandable up to the equivalent of ISO 25,600. The new camera boasts a 39-point AF array with 9 cross-type AF points and works in collaboration with a new 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor to allow 3D AF tracking.

Other changes include the same combined live view/movie switch control as the 3100, and a significantly upgraded movie specification, up to 'full HD' - 1920x1080 resolution at 24fps. The Nikon D7000 produces high quality output in almost any shooting situation. Default JPEGs are clean of artifacts and with natural colors and tonality. At a pixel level low ISO images are very slightly soft but still show very good detail which can be further increased by shooting in RAW. There is one negative though: in bright, high-contrast conditions the camera has a tendency to overexpose - unfortunately by quite a large degree. "


Nikon D90
Sells at approx $850 (wholesale)

12.3 megapixels | 3" screen | APS-C sensor (1.5 times 50 mm lens equiv)

"The first DSLR capable of shooting HD movies (720p at 24fps), the D90 was Nikon's core enthusiast-level offering until the arrival of the D7000. It is built around a 12MP sensor very closely related to that used in the D300S, and - one of several features to 'trickle down' from higher models - it also offers the same highly acclaimed 3.0-inch VGA screen as the D3/D300. Naturally it has Live View with contrast-detect AF and in-camera dust removal. A lot of the D90's core photographic spec is the same as or very similar to the D80, though there is a new shutter and an implementation of the 3D tracking AF seen on the D3/D300. The early talk about the D90 was all about its video capability and indeed it does record HD videos - good ones by digital stills camera standards. But don't let that distract you, this is a camera which lets nothing get in the way of taking photos.

Its degree of configurability results in long menus but they're generally well arranged and color-coded to minimize the likelihood you getting lost in them. There's also the option to create a menu of your most used settings (or list the most recently used ones, if you don't want to spend time setting it up), and a status screen that gives fairly fast access to those key parameters that don't have their own buttons. The image quality, whether at base ISO or the higher settings, is excellent even if it can need a bit of tweaking of the internal settings to tailor the output to specific needs."





nqyringmind
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:29 pm
@engineer,
Would you consider a D90 one of the "ones just below high end"?
What zoom lens do you use?
nqyringmind
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:35 pm
@Ragman,
Thanks! Therein lies my dilemma.
Do I go with the D90, which is probably more my speed right now for my level of experience, or do I go with the higher end D7000 and grow into it?
I also plan to enlarge shots to poster size.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 02:53 pm
@nqyringmind,
I consider the D90 on the high end. If you are good enough to shoot pictures for money then you want a high end camera. One just below high end might be the Canon SX30is. You don't have all the flexibility with lens but it comes with a built in 35x zoom. If you are taking outdoor shots in bright light you can get some insane photos with that, especially at sports events. (I have the previous version SX20is.) That said, for what you want you probably need to go better.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 03:26 pm
I have a D7000 and I really like it. I got it as a gift so I haven't investigated any other cameras though.

Honestly, I feel like I need a computer class to operate it. I've hardly scratched the surface of what all it can do because I'm pretty old school and just really want to use the basic functions and wanted a camera that would allow for manual control.

One thing I've been playing with and really liking is the fact that it can shoot video and you can snatch a single frame out of the video to make a still image. This is great for action shots! Unbelievably great. If you intend to do some action photography you'll want this in your camera.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 03:34 pm
@nqyringmind,
Based on your listed criteria (poster-sized enlargements and doing weddings), the choice is clearly D7000 as the price differential is not that great. Finally, the increased durability of the D7000 nails the choice.

I read earlier that you already own Nikon equipment so it would make no sense to change to any other brand as it would not be financially worthwhile. Plus you're already familiar with Nikon menus, physical layouts, flash systems and lenses.

In my past life, I've sold camera/camera systems retail as well as shot professionally. When upgrading from an earlier Nikon to the newer technology I grew into it quickly enough to not be intimidated or hamstrung by the sophisitcation. After all, you don't have to use every bell and whistle. You do, however, need to be able to find and access what functions you generally use for your 'money' shots.

This sort of familiarity only can come from putting your hands on the 2 camera models and using them either in the shop or on loan. Many retail camera retailers will allow you to borrow, a shop display model for a short period of time. All you have to do is ask (refundable deposit).
0 Replies
 
nqyringmind
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 03:40 pm
Much appreciation to you all.
I was getting blisters sitting on that fence!
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 03:47 pm
@nqyringmind,
So, fill us in... what is your decision?
0 Replies
 
 

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