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Word Of The Day

 
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 12:51 am
@saab,
saab wrote:

So the man Clemence should be a mild and mercyfull person?


Yes, should be. But there can be ironies associated with names like that. For example, in his novel The Godfather, Mario Puzo has as one of his more colorful characters a man named Clemenza. This is a capo regime in Don Corleone's (the Godfather's) crime family and is anything but merciful. I'm sure that Puzo chose that name quite deliberately.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 12:30 pm
Visualette

I can't find an actual definition for this word but it seems to mean, a small short video/film telling a story. I find it similar to the word operetta. If you can find anything on the origins of this world please pass it along. Smile
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 01:59 pm
@RexRed,
imponderable (im-PON-der-uh-buhl), noun:
1. A thing that cannot be precisely determined or measured.

adjective:
1. Not ponderable; that cannot be precisely determined, measured, or evaluated.

Of course he had always been a huge imponderable, if not to say the biggest challenge of her admittedly young life.
-- Lindsay Armstrong, The Constantin Marriage

Of course there's always the imponderable, the unpredictable which can't be foreseen...
-- Leonardo Sciascia, Peter Robb and Sacha Rabinovitch, The Moro Affair

Imponderable comes directly from the Medieval Latin word imponderābilis which had the same meaning.

0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 02:00 pm
@RexRed,
I can't find 'visualette' in any of my dictionaries. Sorry.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 05:23 pm
Blithe [blahyth, blahyth]  
Origin

blithe   [blahyth, blahyth]
adjective, blith·er, blith·est.
1.
joyous, merry, or gay in disposition; glad; cheerful: Everyone loved her for her blithe spirit.
2.
without thought or regard; carefree; heedless: a blithe indifference to anyone's feelings.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English; Old English blīthe; cognate with Old Norse blīthr, Old High German blīdi, Gothic bleiths
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 09:09 pm
Manifesto
man·i·fes·to noun \ˌma-nə-ˈfes-(ˌ)tō\
plural man·i·fes·tos or man·i·fes·toes

Definition of MANIFESTO

: a written statement declaring publicly the intentions, motives, or views of its issuer

Examples of MANIFESTO

The group's manifesto focused on helping the poor and stopping violence.
Origin of MANIFESTO

Italian, denunciation, manifest, from manifestare to manifest, from Latin, from manifestus
First Known Use: 1620
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  3  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 11:59 pm
Ombudsman

From Swedish - I could not resist -, from Old Norse umboðsmaðr.

Pronunciation (RP) IPA: /ˈɒmbʊdzmən/, /ˈɒmbʌdzmæn/
(US) IPA: /ˈɑːmbʌdzmən/
Audio (US)
(file)

Noun ombudsman (plural ombudsmen)

An appointed official whose duty is to investigate complaints, generally on behalf of individuals such as consumers or taxpayers, against institutions such as companies and government departments.
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 12:06 am
@saab,
Good word, Saab. The word has come into more widespread use in the USA over the past couple of decades. Most newspapers now have an editor designated as an ombudsman to handle complaints from readers about either errors in reporting or a particular political slant the paper might have. When I was frst learning the English language 60+plus years ago, I don't think ombudsman was even in general use. Today almost everybody knows what it means.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 01:14 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Ombudsman is not only used in English, but in many other languages like German and Russia.
I think - my opinion - is that it spread outside Sweden after WWII as a word when it got more popular to have a person to handle complaints in different areas of life.
The word has been used in other Scandinavian languages since 1552.
The modern form of the word has been used in Sweden since 1809 when we got a Juridical(?) Ombudsman.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 02:29 am
@saab,
Yes great word! I think we also have ombudsmen who help the elderly with certain difficulties. That is where I have come in contact with the word when my father was in a nursing home. Has anyone heard about ombudsmen for the elderly?
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 02:52 am
After you settled the problems with help of the ombudsman you might like to have an
Aquavit
(also akevitt, a kind of distilled spirit made of potatoes) also a Scandinavian word.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 12:26 pm
@saab,
Hate to contradict you, saab, but aquavit is certainly not originally a Scandinavian word. It's Latin. It means "water of life."
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 12:29 pm
@RexRed,
Sardanapalian(sahr-dn-uh-PEYL-yuhn), adjective:
Excessively luxurious.

Rich papers with gold borders, bronze chandeliers, mahogany engravings in the dining-room, and blue cashmere furniture in the salon, … all details of a chilling and perfectly unmeaning character, but which to the eyes of Ville-aux- Fayes seemed the last efforts of Sardanapalian luxury.
-- Honoré de Balzac, Sons of Soil

Here, in this half-destroyed Tartar town, surrounded by steppes, he indulged himself in a Sardanapalian effulgence that beggared even his jassy Court.
-- Simon Sebag Montefiore, Potemkin

First used in English in the 1860s, Sardanapalian is an eponym that comes from the legendary Assyrian king Sardanapal who was famous for his decadence.

0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 03:19 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
From a rather young age I knew it means water of life, so I don´t mind one bit you are correcting me.

Serving aquavit seems so Scandinavian one forgets it is Latin.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jun, 2012 08:09 pm
Compendium [kuhm-pen-dee-uhm]  

com·pen·di·um   [kuhm-pen-dee-uhm] Show IPA
noun, plural com·pen·di·ums, com·pen·di·a  [-dee-uh] Show IPA.
1.
a brief treatment or account of a subject, especially an extensive subject; concise treatise: a compendium of medicine.
2.
a summary, epitome, or abridgment.
3.
a full list or inventory: a compendium of their complaints.

Origin:
1575–85; < Latin: gain, saving, shortcut, abridgment, equivalent to com- com- + pend- (stem of pendere to cause to hang down, weigh) + -ium -ium

Synonyms
1. survey, digest, conspectus.
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2012 12:04 pm
@RexRed,
agnate (ag-neyt), noun:
1. A relative whose connection is traceable exclusively through males.
2. Any male relation on the father's side.

adjective:
1. Related or akin through males or on the father's side.
2. Allied or akin.

It was considered abomination; no agnate gives up its infant kin in Igboland, no matter the crime.
-- M. O. Ené, Blighted Blues

His uncle in the third segment was the only other agnate who shared patriotic sentiments with Yat-Kuan.
-- Saikaku Ihara, Tales of Japanese Justice

Agnate is derived from the Latin word agnātus which referred to paternal kinsmen.

0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2012 12:46 pm
misanthrope
a person who hates and avoid other people
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2012 12:50 pm
When we are at it may I ask a question?
It is regarding the word resolve. I say: "I solved the problem"
I know one can say "I resolved the problem", but to me it sounds so phony as re for me is something which happens again like reunion, rebirth etc.
If I solve a problem I really do not have to resolve it. Am I too fussy????
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2012 01:17 pm
@saab,
saab wrote:

When we are at it may I ask a question?
It is regarding the word resolve. I say: "I solved the problem"
I know one can say "I resolved the problem", but to me it sounds so phony as re for me is something which happens again like reunion, rebirth etc.
If I solve a problem I really do not have to resolve it. Am I too fussy????
I don't think it is proper to use resolve as you did. "I resolved the problem." According to the dictionary resolve means "Firmly determined to do something" not necessarily to figure out a conundrum or problem. "I resolved the problem" would for the most part be grammatically incorrect. Re-solved would be to attempt to over again solve. They resolved to carry on.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jun, 2012 06:01 pm
Paradigm [par-uh-dahym, -dim]  

par·a·digm   [par-uh-dahym, -dim]
noun
Definition of PARADIGM
1: example, pattern; especially : an outstandingly clear or typical example or archetype
2: an example of a conjugation or declension showing a word in all its inflectional forms
3: a philosophical and theoretical framework of a scientific school or discipline within which theories, laws, and generalizations and the experiments performed in support of them are formulated; broadly : a philosophical or theoretical framework of any kind

Origin:
1475–85; < Late Latin paradīgma < Greek parádeigma pattern (verbid of paradeiknýnai to show side by side), equivalent to para- para-1 + deik-, base of deiknýnai to show ( see deictic) + -ma noun suffix

Synonyms
2. mold, standard; ideal, paragon, touchstone.
0 Replies
 
 

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