7
   

Word Of The Day

 
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Sep, 2012 05:05 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
strepitous (STREP-i-tuhs), adjective:
boisterous; noisy.

But what strepitous sounds, what harmonious tumult diverts my attention to another part ?
-- José Francisco de Isla, The History of the Famous Preacher, Friar Gerund de Campazas

Here is no idyllic meditative retreat from the strepitous city but a scene of virile action—fields sounding with human labor, vibrating with human energy.
-- Beulah B. Amram, "Swinburne and Carducci," The Yale Review

Strepitous stems from the Latin word strepit which meant "noise."


0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Sep, 2012 09:10 pm
Copious 

co·pi·ous   [koh-pee-uhs]
adjective
1.large in quantity or number; abundant; plentiful: copious amounts of food.
2.having or yielding an abundant supply: a copious larder; a copious harvest.
3.exhibiting abundance or fullness, as of thoughts or words.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin cōpiōsus plentiful, rich, equivalent to cōpi ( a ) wealth ( co- co- + op ( s ) Ops + -ia -ia) + -ōsus -ous

Related forms
co·pi·ous·ly, adverb
co·pi·ous·ness, co·pi·os·i·ty  [koh-pee-os-i-tee] Show IPA, noun
o·ver·co·pi·ous, adjective
o·ver·co·pi·ous·ly, adverb
o·ver·co·pi·ous·ness, noun
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Oct, 2012 12:24 am
o·blig·a·to·ry/əˈbligəˌtôrē/
Adjective:
Required by a legal, moral, or other rule; compulsory.
So customary or routine as to be expected of everyone or on every occasion.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Oct, 2012 05:26 pm
@RexRed,
hamartia (hah-mahr-TEE-uh) , noun:
Tragic flaw.

What is Oedipus' hamartia that leads to his self-fulfilling self-reversal?
-- Laszlo Versényi, Man's Measure

We called it by many different things, such as hubris or hamartia, but given the way you butcher Latin, let's stick with English.
-- Stephanie Draven, The Fever and the Fury

Hamartia stems from the Greek word hamartánein which meant "to err." However, it entered English in the late 1800s.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Oct, 2012 11:19 pm
every word is a poem
http://www.studylight.org/lex/grk/view.cgi?number=4161
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:49 am
Sentient
sen·tient/ˈsenCH(ē)ənt/
Adjective:
Able to perceive or feel things: "sentient life forms".

Synonyms:
sensitive - sensible - susceptible - tender - feeling

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin sentient- (stem of sentiēns, present participle of sentīre to feel), equivalent to senti- verb stem + -ent- -ent
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:55 pm
franchise (FRAN-chahyz) , noun:
1. The right to vote.

2. A privilege of a public nature conferred on an individual,group, or company by a government.

One factor in the early mobilization of feminism was the 1832 Reform Act, through which women's exclusion from the franchise was formalized.
-- Angélique Richardson, Chris Willis, The new woman in fiction and in fact: fin-de-siècle feminisms

The national referendum of 1963 reflected general support for the six-point reform program, which included land reform and the franchise for women.
-- Robin Morgan, Sisterhood Is Global: The International Women's Movement Anthology -

Franchise derives from the Old French word for "freedom," which shares a root with the English frank.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Nov, 2012 10:02 pm
chicanery

chi·can·er·y   [shi-key-nuh-ree, chi-]
noun, plural chi·can·er·ies.

1. trickery or deception by quibbling or sophistry: He resorted to the worst flattery and chicanery to win the job.
2. a quibble or subterfuge used to trick, deceive, or evade.

Origin:
1605–15; < French chicanerie. See chicane, -ery

Synonyms
1. fraud, deception, knavery. 2. evasion.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Nov, 2012 02:33 pm
@RexRed,
pigeonhole (PIJ-uhn-hohl) , verb:
1. To lay aside for use or reference at some later, indefinite time.

noun:
1. One of a series of small, open compartments, as in a desk,cabinet, or the like, used for filing or sorting papers, letters,etc.

2. In printing, white space created by setting words or lines too far apart.

“Mobility’s hard in Spain; people pigeonhole you for life in the box where they think you belong.”
-- Enrique Vila-Mata, Dublinesque

Even his staunchest supporters didn't know where to pigeonhole him politically.
-- Bruce Duffy, The World As I Found It

Pigeonhole begins with the sense of a literal nesting place for the bird, then finds figurative usage in printing. The first use as a verb is recorded in 1854.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 08:46 am
Succor
suc·cor
/ˈsəkər/
Noun
Assistance and support in times of hardship and distress.
Verb
Give assistance or aid to.
Synonyms
noun. succour - aid - help - assistance - relief - support
verb. succour - assist - help - relieve - aid - support
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 09:49 pm
Hyperbole  

hy·per·bo·le [hahy-pur-buh-lee]
noun, Rhetoric .
1.obvious and intentional exaggeration.
2.an extravagant statement or figure of speech not intended to be taken literally, as “to wait an eternity.”
Compare litotes.

Origin:
1520–30; < Greek hyperbolḗ excess, exaggeration, throwing beyond, equivalent to hyper- hyper- + bolḗ throw

Synonyms
2. overstatement.

Antonyms
2. understatement.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Dec, 2012 03:17 am
Subsume
sub·sume (sb-sm)
tr.v. sub·sumed, sub·sum·ing, sub·sumes

To classify, include, or incorporate in a more comprehensive category or under a general principle: "The evolutionarily later always subsumes and includes the evolutionarily earlier" (Frederick Turner).

[Medieval Latin subsmere : Latin sub-, sub- + Latin smere, to take; see em- in Indo-European roots.]
sub·suma·ble adj.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Feb, 2013 08:33 pm
-ium
a suffix found on nouns borrowed from Latin, especially derivatives of verbs ( odium; tedium; colloquium; delirium ), deverbal compounds with the initial element denoting the object of the verb ( nasturtium ), other types of compounds ( equilibrium; millennium ), and derivatives of personal nouns, often denoting the associated status or office ( collegium; consortium; magisterium ); -ium, also occurs in scientific coinages on a Latin model, as in names of metallic elements ( barium; titanium ) and as a Latinization of Gk -ion ( pericardium ).
Origin:
< Neo-Latin, Latin, neuter suffix

Verbium de Die
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Mar, 2013 10:01 pm
Ambition
am·bi·tion
/amˈbiSHən/
Noun
A strong desire to do or to achieve something, typically requiring determination and hard work.
Desire and determination to achieve success.
Synonyms
aspiration - ambitiousness - desire
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 08:16 pm
Stipend
sti·pend
/ˈstīˌpend/
Noun
A fixed regular sum paid as a salary or allowance.
Synonyms
salary - pay - wage - wages - emolument - earnings
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 04:24 pm
@RexRed,
splenetic (spli-NET-ik) , adjective:

1. irritable; peevish; spiteful.
2. of the spleen; splenic.
3. Obsolete. affected with, characterized by, or tending to produce melancholy.

noun:
1. a splenetic person.

You see, she stoutly maintained the belief that beneath this splenetic and ogreish exterior there beat a heart of gold, though this I imagine was something she had to do, the idea that her father was splenetic and ogreish all the way through being just too grim to contemplate.
-- Patrick McGrath, The Grotesque, 1989

It is true, when the wind is easterly, or the gout gives him a gentle twinge, or he hears of any new successes of the French, he will become a little splenetic; and heaven help the man...that crosses his humor.
-- Washington Irving, Samalagundi, 1807
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Apr, 2013 02:33 pm
AGRAFE

Definition of Agrafe,

: a hook-and-loop fastening; especially : an ornamental clasp used on armor or costumes and for the "metalbasket" holding the cork on the bottle of champagne.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2013 03:37 pm
Perspicacity
per·spi·cac·i·ty [pur-spi-kas-i-tee]
noun
1. keenness of mental perception and understanding; discernment; penetration.
2. Archaic. keen vision.

Origin:
1540–50; earlier perspicacite < Late Latin perspicācitās sharpness of sight, equivalent to perspicāci- (stem of perspicāx sharp-sighted; see perspicuous) + -tās -ty2

Synonyms
1. shrewdness, acuity, astuteness, insight, acumen.

Antonyms
1. obtuseness.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Aug, 2013 08:25 pm
im·pe·ri·ous
/imˈpi(ə)rēəs/
Adjective
Assuming authority without justification; arrogant; domineering.
Synonyms
imperative - overbearing - masterful - authoritative
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2013 03:23 pm
Begrumpled.

Look it up, and it will mean exactly what you think it does.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Word Of The Day
  3. » Page 11
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/02/2021 at 09:34:17