7
   

Word Of The Day

 
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jun, 2012 03:25 pm
skald/skôld/
Noun:
(in ancient Scandinavia) A composer and reciter of poems honoring heroes and their deeds.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jun, 2012 03:47 pm
Circumlocution
cir·cum·lo·cu·tion noun \ˌsər-kəm-lō-ˈkyü-shən\

Definition of CIRCUMLOCUTION

1: the use of an unnecessarily large number of words to express an idea
2: evasion in speech
— cir·cum·loc·u·to·ry adjective

Examples of CIRCUMLOCUTION

He was criticized for his use of circumlocution.
I'm trying to avoid circumlocutions in my writing.
Origin of CIRCUMLOCUTION

Middle English circumlocucyon, from Latin circumlocution-, circumlocutio, from circum- + locutio speech, from loqui to speak
First Known Use: 15th century
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Jun, 2012 07:12 pm
@RexRed,
larrup \LAR-uhp\, verb:
To beat or thrash.

When a seagoing canoe beached on the stones, or when a neighbor came larruping from around back of the house, Martha Obenchain, peeling potatoes at a table in the sun, rose and put the kettle on, tickled pink.
-- Annie Dillard, The Living
A fast white boat comes larruping around the point from the direction of Mercer Island and banks towards him.
-- Neal Stephenson, Cryptonomicon

Larrup may derive from the Dutch word larpen meaning "to beat with flails".

0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2012 05:34 pm
divulse \dahy-VUHLS\, verb:
To tear away or apart.

A perforation having been so made, it is safer to divulse the opening rather than to enlarge it by cutting in order to avoid the possibility of opening a blood vessel in an inaccessible region.
-- Eugene Fuller, M.D., The Journal of the American Medical Association
Even if you are the kooper of the winkel over measure never lost a license. Nor a duckindonche divulse from bath and breakfast.
-- James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

Divulse comes from the Latin root vellere meaning "plucked". The prefix di- is a variation of dis- before the letter v meaning "apart" or "away", as in disown.

0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2012 10:22 pm
snit/snit/
Noun:
A fit of irritation; a sulk: "the ambassador had withdrawn in a snit".

origin unknown
First Known Use: 1939
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 Jun, 2012 10:45 pm
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:

skald/skôld/
Noun:
(in ancient Scandinavia) A composer and reciter of poems honoring heroes and their deeds.


Good word, that. You seldom see it in English, not these days. It's the exact counterpart of the Anglo-Saxon scop or gleeman.
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Jun, 2012 07:13 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
pochismo \poh-CHEEZ-moh\, noun:
1. An English word or expression borrowed into Spanish.
2. A form of speech employing many such words.
3. An adopted U.S. custom, attitude, etc.

Along the Texas border, in the towns on both sides of the Rio Grande, they call a similar blending of languages pochismo.
-- Robert Wilder, Plough the Sea

The assimilation of English with Spanish speech and of Hispanic with Anglo traits in the mixed culture termed pochismo has brought contrasting values and characteristics into play within families and even within individuals.
-- Milo Kearney and Manuel Medrano, Medieval Culture and the Mexican American Borderlands

Pochismo entered English in the 1940s. It is a variation of the word pocho which refers to a person of Mexican heritage who has adopted American customs. The suffix -ismo is usually the Spanish equivalent of the English suffix -ism.

Perhaps a more frequently heard word, meaning essentially the same thing, these days is "Spanglish," a combination of Spanish and Engish spoken by people who are not totally at home or fluent in either language.

0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jun, 2012 11:19 pm
mystḗrion

(mystery)
Etymology
From Middle English mysterie, from Latin mysterium, from Ancient Greek μυστήριον (musterion, “a mystery, a secret, a secret rite”), from μύστης (mustēs, “initiated one”), from μυέω (mueō, “I initiate”), from μύω (muō, “I shut”).
[edit]Noun
mystery (plural mysteries)
Something secret or unexplainable; unknown.
The truth behind the events remains a mystery.
Someone or thing with an obscure or puzzling nature.
That man is a mystery.
(Catholicism) A particular event or series of events in the life of Christ.
The second decade of the Rosary concerns the Sorrowful mysteries, such as the crucifixion and the crowning with thorns.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mystery
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Jun, 2012 11:34 pm

A mystery is incomplete information.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 12:24 am
Treasure
(from Greek θησαυρός - thēsauros, meaning is a concentration of riches, often one which is considered lost or forgotten until being rediscovered.

choose the word because I think this "Word of the day" is a treasure
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 12:27 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:


A mystery is incomplete information.


Not so. Look it up. If that is how you are using the word, David, you are misusing it. Merely incomplete information is no mystery.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 12:37 am
@Lustig Andrei,
We disagree on that, Andy,
but I will not deny the possibility
that u might find (ill-considered) lexicografers who will agree with u.

Please bear in mind that I reject the JTT filosofy,
that meaning is defined by use.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 01:09 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Lemme put it this way, Andy:
if the missing information is subsequently discovered,
THEN can there still exist a "mystery" ?

I don't think so.





David




Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 01:26 am
@OmSigDAVID,
My point, David, is that the word "mystery" implies a great deal more than just missing information. It implies that there is information which is not known and which is, perhaps, unknowable. It is not "missing" in the sense that it can be discovered with a little effort. If that is the case, there is no actual mystery, merely an unsolved problem. A mystery implies something much deeper.
saab
 
  3  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 02:38 am
Fact is, I have incomplete information regarding their divorce.
The mystery is why they married in the first place.

That is how I would see the difference between mystery and incomplete information.
I am on Lustig´s side.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 02:58 am
2 Corinthians 4:7
But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 03:43 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:
My point, David, is that the word "mystery"
implies a great deal more than just missing information.
Maybe; not necessarily;
e.g., will u admit that bookstores r replete
with "mysteries" involving fictional murders,
based upon human inter-action?? Maybe love-triangles?
If the author earns the price of his book,
B4 it is over, he has provided his reader with all of the initially absent information,
so that everything is lucidly explained ("I did this because he did that")
such that there no longer exists any mystery. Do u agree with that??




Lustig Andrei wrote:
It implies that there is information which is not known and which is, perhaps, unknowable.
It is vaguely used to mean that,
oblivious to the logic that if & when the additional information
is acquired, then there will no longer be a mystery; e.g., for many years,
I was under the impression that no one knew what was on the other side of human death.
That was B4 it was published (in the 1970s) that many people had come back to life in hospitals
(especially after defibrillation) and TOLD us.

For many years (like all of human history and pre-history)
it was a mystery what was on the far side of the Moon.
Then in the 1960s, we WENT THERE and looked down;
that was the abrupt end of the mystery. It was no longer "unknowable" as u put it.


Lustig Andrei wrote:
It is not "missing" in the sense that it can be discovered with a little effort.
If that is the case, there is no actual mystery, merely an unsolved problem.
YES; unsolved because of incomplete information.
The MYSTERY cannot survive arrival of the rest of the information which explains it.




Lustig Andrei wrote:
A mystery implies something much deeper.
It only seems spooky as long as we remain IGNORANT.

Another way to put the same point
is that MYSTERY is made out of IGNORANCE.





David
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 06:15 am

A mysterious fact that there has to be discordance about words in this treasure.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 11:24 am
@saab,
Seems like a mignon disagreement to me.

mignon \min-YON\, adjective:
Small and pretty; delicately pretty.

And here Jasmin caressed his own arm, and made as if it were a baby's, smiling and speaking in a mignon voice, wagging his head roguishly.
-- William Chambers and Robert Chambers, Chambers's Edinburgh Journal
As the village princeling and household cosset, the toast of the family, the mignon of the minions, the darling of the staff, my feelings about the proposed adoption would not be hard to divine.
-- Martin Amis, Success

Mignon stems from the French word of the same spelling which means "delicate" or "charming". It is also related to the word "minion" through the sense of "small".

OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 12:11 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Don 't u wish to continue our discussion ?

I thawt it was interesting; did u ?





David
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Word Of The Day
  3. » Page 3
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/05/2021 at 01:40:53