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Word Of The Day

 
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 01:06 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Don 't u wish to continue our discussion ?


Frankly, not particularly. You've presented your point of view, I've expressed mine. I get no pleasure out of beating a dead horse, unlike so many people on this site. Debate for its own sake holds absolutely no fascination for me. I would have been a lousy courtroom lawyer for that reason alone. Never joined a debating society in high school; saw no point in it. You're entitled to your opinion (wrong, though it is Smile), I'll continue to have mine.

Nice talking to you, Dave.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 01:51 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
A mignon disagreement at least not based on misogyny

( the hatred or dislike of women or girls.)
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 02:31 pm
@saab,
Good word, misogyny, saab.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Jun, 2012 12:12 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Nice talking to you, Andy.





David
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Jun, 2012 12:18 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

Nice talking to you, Andy.
David


We'll do it again, I'm sure. It's just that this subject is pretty well exhausted.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 12:37 am
Condescension
con·de·scen·sion (knd-snshn)
n.
1. The act of condescending or an instance of it.
2. Patronizingly superior behavior or attitude.

[Late Latin condscnsi, condecencio, condscnsin-, from condscnsus, past participle of condscendere, to condescend; see condescend.]


God breathed
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 12:41 am
@RexRed,
ravelment \RAV-uhl-muhnt\, noun:
Entanglement; confusion.

Hampered as I was by my well-known connection with the Gillespie poisoning case, I could not personally make a move towards the ravelment of its mystery without subjecting myself to the curiosity of the people among whom my attention of the District Attorney's office and the suspicion of the men whose business I was in a measure attempting to usurp.
-- Anna Katharine Green, One of My Sons

What I could see clearly, though, was the lower course of the burn: this bisected the small valley and appeared to loop around the far side of the dwelling, partly enfolding it before it broadened out and spread thence through arable to a ravelment of stone and incoming sea.
-- Clifford Geddes, Edge of the Glen
Ravelment derives from the word ravel which means "to become tangled". It entered English in the early 1800s.

0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 12:47 am
Eponymous
ep·on·y·mous   [uh-pon-uh-muhs]
adjective
giving one's name to a tribe, place, etc.: Romulus, the eponymous founder of Rome.

Origin:
1840–50; < Greek epṓnymos giving name. See ep-, -onym, -ous
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 01:15 am
The eponymous founder of The Bronx is not an anonymous person, but the Danish farmer Bronck.

Some say he was a Swede others he was a Dane and some just say emigrant. I say he was a Dane.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 01:36 am
@saab,
For some reason I always assumed hewas Dutch. After all, the Bronx was established at the time that what is now New York was called New Amsterdam. (I'm sure I'm wrong and you're right, saab.)
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 07:30 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Story one
A Dane by the name Bronck married a Dutch lady and left for New York.
They had friends in the city, who liked to visit the farm and sad
Lets go out the Broncks.

Story two
something like that just now it is a Swede who left for New York and who had friends and....the rest of the story you know.

But who knows....maybe it is like Tordenskjold - is a Dane in Denmark and a Norwegian in Norway.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 10:58 am
Audacity

au·dac·i·ty   [aw-das-i-tee]
noun, plural au·dac·i·ties.
1.boldness or daring, especially with confident or arrogant disregard for personal safety, conventional thought, or other restrictions.
2.effrontery or insolence; shameless boldness: His questioner's audacity shocked the lecturer.
3.Usually, audacities. audacious acts or statements.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English audacite < Latin audāc-, stem of audāx daring (adj.) + -ite -ity

0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2012 09:25 pm
Cinema [sin-uh-muh]  

cin·e·ma   [sin-uh-muh] Show IPA
noun
1. Chiefly British . motion picture.
2. the cinema, motion pictures collectively, as an art.
3. Chiefly British . a motion-picture theater.

Origin:
1895–1900; short for cinematograph

Comment: This word has always intrigued me, I have always broken the word down in my mind to the root words "sin mass" although I think that is most likely (if not certainly) erroneous. I was never taught that interpretation of the word I just sorta figured it out.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 01:50 am
Morphology
mor·phol·o·gy   [mawr-fol-uh-jee]
noun
1.the branch of biology dealing with the form and structure of organisms.
2.the form and structure of an organism considered as a whole.
3.Linguistics .
a.the patterns of word formation in a particular language, including inflection, derivation, and composition.
b.the study and description of such patterns.
c.the study of the behavior and combination of morphemes.
4.Physical Geography . geomorphology.
5.the form or structure of anything: to gain an insight into the morphology of our political system.

Origin:
1820–30; morpho- + -logy; first formed in German
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2012 09:51 pm
@RexRed,
mewl \myool\, verb:
To cry, as a baby, young child, or the like; whimper.

When Celia was growing up, her father had taken in a stray kitten, an avid hunter who – by the time Celia had left for college – still had not gotten over a formative, stray-life trauma that compelled it to mewl between mouthfuls of food.
-- Myla Goldberg, The False Friend
They have mouths that twitch, and eyes that stare, and they babble and they mewl and they whimper.
-- Neil Gaiman, Smoke and Mirrors
Mewl is an imitative word that mimics the sound of a whimper.

0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 01:58 am
inclement weather= stormy

Yesterday it was so stormy I could not swim.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 02:08 am
@saab,
saab wrote:

inclement weather= stormy

Yesterday it was so stormy I could not swim.


That's a good word -- inclement. If you look at the Latin root, it actually means "without mercy" or "merciless." It comes from the same root as the word "clemency." So if you have stormy weather and can't go swimming, the weather gods are showing you no mercy. Smile
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 03:49 am
@Lustig Andrei,
So the man Clemence should be a mild and mercyfull person?
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 09:39 am
Phantasmagoria
phan·tas·ma·go·ria noun \(ˌ)fan-ˌtaz-mə-ˈgȯr-ē-ə\

Definition of PHANTASMAGORIA

1: an exhibition of optical effects and illusions
2
a : a constantly shifting complex succession of things seen or imagined
b : a scene that constantly changes
3: a bizarre or fantastic combination, collection, or assemblage
— phan·tas·ma·gor·ic or phan·tas·ma·gor·i·cal adjective

Examples of PHANTASMAGORIA

He saw a phantasmagoria of shadowy creatures through the fog.
Origin of PHANTASMAGORIA

French phantasmagorie, from phantasme phantasm (from Old French fantasme) + -agorie (perhaps from Greek agora assembly) — more at agora
First Known Use: circa 1802
saab
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 12:33 am
@RexRed,
Which makes me think about:
Fata Morgana

is an unusual and complex form of superior mirage that is seen in a narrow band right above the horizon. It is an Italian phrase derived from the vulgar Latin for "fairy" and the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, from a belief that these mirages, often seen in the Strait of Messina, were fairy castles in the air or false land created by her witchcraft to lure sailors to their death. Although the term Fata Morgana is sometimes incorrectly applied to other, more common kinds of mirages, the true Fata Morgana is not the same as an ordinary superior mirage, nor is it the same as an inferior mirage.

Fata Morgana mirages distort the object or objects which they are based on significantly, often such that the object is completely unrecognizable. A Fata Morgana can be seen on land or at sea, in polar regions or in deserts. This kind of mirage can involve almost any kind of distant object, including boats, islands, and the coastline.
0 Replies
 
 

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