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NCAA Basketball- Where's the Madness?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Mar, 2012 03:36 pm
@sozobe,
The madness is that I'll try to find the Lobos game online or on the radio - they're playing Louisville a bit later on.

Three keys to a Lobos victory
by Chris Hansen, CBSSports.com

No. 1 - Stopping Siva. Since the start of the postseason, Cardinals PG Peyton Siva has averaged nearly 15 ppg and 6 apg. G Kendall Williams , who did a nice job slowing Long Beach State G Casper Ware, will have to come up big again. No. 2 - Attack Louisville C Dieng. The Cardinals are a completely different team when 6-11 shotblocker Gorgui Dieng is patrolling the paint. But the sophomore is also foul prone so expect Lobos C Drew Gordon , a saavy senior with nice scoring touch, to aggressively go after Dieng to get him on the bench. No. 3 - Push the pace. The Lobos are 27-1 when their opponents score less than 70 points. But Louisville averages just 68 and is 27-9 because it can control the pace of the game through defense. The Lobos can’t let the Cardinals slow them down.


(nice to hear about baby Stockton..)
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2012 06:32 pm
yea,,,,Mich. St.

Joe(who else?)Nation
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2012 07:17 pm
@Joe Nation,
Joe Nation wrote:

yea,,,,Mich. St.

Joe(who else?)Nation
Too many fouls... To many 3 point attempts, and not enough hustle... Big ten is tough this year... Are they tough enough???
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2012 07:19 pm
@Fido,
Purdue is putting it to Kansas early...
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2012 07:25 pm
@Rockhead,
Rockhead wrote:

Purdue is putting it to Kansas early...
They are tough... The big ten has been tough except for the only team in the universe of Michigan... They should stick to football and anything that requires intelligence...
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 02:56 am
http://www.newyorker.com/images/2012/03/26/cartoons/120326_cartoon_004_a16495_p465.gif
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 05:09 am
@Rockhead,
Rockhead wrote:

Purdue is putting it to Kansas early...
Purdue lost... State, MSU will be too if they don't learn to put it away..3 pointers should be forbidden unless no one can get inside, or the clock is under 4 seconds... Go in for the high percentage shots and draw the foul trying...
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 07:28 am
@Fido,
Re: Mich ST:
I think you are right, unless they learned the lessons taught yesterday, they will not be in the Round of 8.

Joe(Onward!)Nation
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 07:53 am
@Joe Nation,
Joe Nation wrote:

Re: Mich ST:
I think you are right, unless they learned the lessons taught yesterday, they will not be in the Round of 8.

Joe(Onward!)Nation
The thing is that the Big Ten has been tough this year, but on almost any day, one team could beat another if the other was off... Izzo is a great coach, but some times I think he has reached the limit of his ability... And so often it is staff and scouts who make the difference in the half time, seeing who is hot, what their game is, where the good looks are, who correct performance on both teams, and who ever can adapt the best can win... These are the big boys now, and you see that the refs can get down right picky in their calls... There is no alternative but to play good, hard, and smart... State is used to a lot of brawling, and they ain't cry babies... They know if they play as well as they can play that they have a good chance of taking the game... I know on a good day Ohio State can take them, but Ohio could take anyone on a good day... The Ohio Women are tough too... I tell people- in Ohio the men are men, and the women are too; but that is true of our upper Peninsula as well...Where I grew up no one gives anyone any **** so they can avoid the consequences of having to take it all back...
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 07:56 am
@Fido,
(Rosie the Ohioan flexes her bicep...)

I love Samantha Prahalis. Haven't watched much of the women this year though, need to remedy that.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 08:09 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:

(Rosie the Ohioan flexes her bicep...)

I love Samantha Prahalis. Haven't watched much of the women this year though, need to remedy that.
I have seen her play Moo U a couple of times now... We can afford to go to the girls games once in a while...Prahalis owns the court...
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Mar, 2012 09:46 am
@sozobe,
been watching both - the men and women's - usually just bits and pieces. I just love watching some unknown team win. There was I can't remember which women's team yesterday - they seemed smaller, but they were hitting the 3 pointers like you couldn't believe.

Have you seen the movie Mighty Macs - it is about a women's catholic college team that really stinks from the 70s I think - they come back and win it all - based on a true story. The overall movie ain't that great - but there are so few women's sports movies out there.
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 07:25 am
Um,,,,,

Go...Wisconsin.

Joe(smashed bracket)Nation
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 07:43 am
@Joe Nation,
Oh really? Yay.

(Ich bin ein Buckeye but when I'm not, ich bin ein Badger.) (I was a Badger first.)
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 07:50 am
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

... but there are so few women's sports movies out there.


I poked around out of curiosity to see how true it is. Just for the hell of it I looked up some of the best and most notable women's sports movies where the woman herself is the athlete. I came up with the following movies:

o A League of Their Own (1992) - baseball
o National Velvet (1944) - Equestrianism
o Bring It On (2000) – Kirsten Dunst; Cheerleading
o Bend It Like Beckham (2002) soccer
o Whip It (2009) – Roller Derby; Drew Barrymore
o Blue Crush (2002) - Surfing
o Million Dollar Baby (2004) – Boxing; Clint Eastwood & Hilary Swank
o Girlfight (2000) - Boxing
o Ice Castles (1978) – Ice skating

Provisionally, I'm adding this one - even though Sandra Bullock is not the actual performing athlete herself:
o The Blind Side (2009)

Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 08:00 am
@Ragman,
I should be clearer team sports that are appropriate for young girls. I think because my girls are involved in team sports I try to seek out those. But even so - that is not too many to choose from considering the list that pertains to men.

There was one that was in the making but never made that I was really interested in seeing - it was about a minor league woman pitcher that struck out Babe Ruth - after that they no longer allowed women to play professional baseball (they were too delicate).
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 08:29 am
@Linkat,
Bend it Like Beckham fits the criteria, doesn't it?

That cheerleading movie is about a team sport for girls, too.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 08:46 am
@Ragman,
Yeah - they fit - but there are very few.

You can fit lots for boys.

For example lookie here for every "girl" movie there are several geared more geared towards boys....
http://www.amazon.com/25-Great-Kids-Sports-Movies/lm/UMQQG3LQBIT

But back to the madness ....
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 08:47 am
@Linkat,
I ceertainly agree that hollywood movie and media in general has a lopsidedness to how they skew and look at sports and gender participation.

Forgive me for the length of this (and some repetition), but here's a more comprehensive list based on the theme of girls team sports:

MOVIES

Annie O (1995, PG)

Ah, equality without lawsuits. There is no girls’ varsity basketball team at Washington High School, but Annie "Sure Shot" Rojas plays better than anyone in the school, boy or girl. So, the boys’ coach invites her to try out for his team. She’s ostracized at first by her teammates, who include her brother and boyfriend, but eventually they realize she’s not a threat but the reason the team keeps winning. By the next year, without one mention of Title IX, Washington has a girls’ varsity team!

Bend It Like Beckham (2003, PG-13)

Bend It Like Beckham is true girl power. This glorious comedy centers on Jess (Parminder Nagra), an Indian girl born in England whose only desire is to become a football--or, as we say on this side of the Atlantic, soccer--star like her idol, David Beckham; but her traditional family refuses to even consider it. With the help of her new friend Juliet (Keira Knightley), Jess secretly joins a girls' team under the guidance of a male coach (Jonathan Rhys Meyers). As the team starts to gain some attention, Jess's secret can't be kept forever. The story of Bend It Like Beckham is so genuine and detailed that it transcends all the sports-movie formulas that it also fulfills with cheeky exuberance. Wonderfully acted, and written and directed with loving care by Gurinder Chadha (Bhaji on the Beach, What's Cooking?), this movie is pure delight from start to finish. --Bret Fetzer

~Blue Crush (2002, PG-13)

With refreshing energy, Blue Crush is the kind of movie that girls and young women deserve to see more of…It rejuvenates the surf-movie tradition by showing real girls with real friendships, coping with absent parents, borderline poverty, rocky romance and the challenge of raising a kid sister. For young Hawaiian Anne Marie (Kate Bosworth), those responsibilities are motivations to excel as a champion-class surfer...if she can overcome the fear of drowning, which she nearly did in a previous wipeout. Supportive friends (Girlfight's Michelle Rodriguez and Sanoe Lake) help her reach the climactic competition on Oahu's infamous Bonzai Pipeline, and like Saturday Night Fever, this engaging film uplifts the working class without condescension, riding high toward the joy of achievement. Himself an amateur surfer, director John Stockwell (Crazy/Beautiful) captures the extreme thrill of the sport while respecting the forces of nature and human behavior. --Jeff Shannon

~Bring It On (2000, PG-13)

Sunny, happy Torrance (Kirsten Dunst) is the new leader of the Toros, the cheerleading squad of Rancho Carne, an affluent San Diego high school that has lousy football players but one hell of a cheerleading team. National champions, they're the ones who bring in the bodies to the football games with their award-winning moves and sassy grace, and they're poised to take their sixth national cheer title. Torrance's new reign as cheer queen, though, is cut short when she discovers that her snotty, duplicitous forerunner was regularly stealing routines from the East Compton Clovers, the hip-hop influenced cheerleaders of a poor inner city school, and passing them off as the original work of the Toros. Scrambling to come up with a new routine for the Toros--and do the right thing by giving the Clovers their due--Torrance butts heads with the proud and understandably wary Isis (Gabrielle Union), the leader of the Clovers, who wants nothing to do with a rich blond white girl, but does want to get her squad to the championships. Problem is, only one team can take home the national title. Who's it gonna be?

~Center Stage (2000, PG-13)

The primary appeal of dance movies is the dancing, with some added emphasis on the romance the art expresses. Center Stage wins on these counts, despite its reveling in overly familiar characters and formula plotting. Or maybe this reveling is responsible for what goofy fun this film is. The arduous task of becoming a professional ballet dancer is incarnated by many good-looking teens, all stock dance-film characters affectionately portrayed mostly by newcomers. But Center Stage holds Jody Sawyer (Amanda Schull), who may never be a great ballerina, but she's certainly one [great] jazz dancer. Then there's the arrogant genius (Ethan Stiefel), the dictatorial impresario (Peter Gallagher), the demanding instructor, the bulimic, the stage mother, etc. As we follow these characters, the message develops that one should let go and do what feels good. Jody may not be ballet material, but she scorches the stage when she's uninhibited…[the film] is all fun. --Jim Gay

~Cutting Edge (1992, PG)

As far as ice-skating movies go (or those that prominently feature the cold-bladed sport), this romantic movie is one of the best, thanks to utterly charming performances by underrated actors D.B. Sweeney and Moira Kelly. The couple play, respectively, a washed-up hockey player and a prima-donna skater who end up in doubles figure skating together at the Olympic Winter Games. Of course, the mismatched pair fall in love. In between, there's a lot of verbal sparring, talk of toe picks and surprisingly skillful directing by Paul Michael Glaser (Kazaam, The Air Up There). Direction here is critical--unlike in Flashdance, where the dancing was done in the shadows, face and feet obviously shot separately--and credibly highlights the actors and their professional stand-ins. This is such a fun, sweet story that the facts the film takes liberties with--including the alacrity with which a hockey player takes to Olympic-level figure skating--are easily forgivable. --N.F. Mendoza

A League of Their Own (1992, PG)

It’s 1943. The ranks of Major League Baseball have gone to war, yet America still wants to watch baseball. That summer, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was formed and took women out of the house to play ball and change their lives forever. The film is based on real events and will make you want to start a girls’ baseball league in your area. The star studded cast features: Geena Davis, Lori Petty, Rosie O’Donnell, Madonna and Tom Hanks.

*Love & Basketball (2000, PG-13)

An unusual romantic sports drama by Spike Lee, revolving around male and female basketball players. In l980s Los Angeles childhood friends Sanaa Lathan and Omar Epps hang out together through school and college. As their relationship blossoms, they become a couple and share their mutual dream of, and striving towards, professional basketball careers.

*Nadia (1984, NR)

Biography of Romanian Nadia Comaneci, the first Olympic gymnast to achieve a perfect score of l0. After her astounding triumphs at the l976 Games, her personal life plummeted to tragic depths. This movie relates how she eventually managed to struggle back up again, enhancing her inspiring story with striking gymnastic footage.

~The Next Karate Kid (1994, PG)

Hilary Swank plays 17-year-old Julie Pierce, the recently orphaned and troubled granddaughter of an old war buddy of Miyagi Yakuga (Noriyuki "Pat" Morita, the lone holdover from the previous Karate Kid films). Harassed at school by adolescent boys under the sway of an evil coach (Michael Ironside), Julie reluctantly finds refuge in the calm teachings of Mr. Yakuga. While the film's violence is as contrived and silly as that of the other KK features, the script provides exotic compensations via a subplot set in a peaceful Buddhist monastery. Still, it's Morita's crafty professionalism and Swank's emotional authenticity that makes this film more watchable than anyone might have expected. --Tom Keogh

*Personal Best (1982, R)

The performance of former Olympian Patrice Donnelly (as Tori) and the various shots of elite female athletes pushing themselves to be their best make this movie an authentic portrayal of the way Olympic athletes train and live. Although the movie may best be remembered for the relationship that develops between Tori and Chris (Mariel Hemingway), the movie’s real gift is the way it explores the psychological as well as the physical struggles associated with being an elite athlete.

Quarterback Princess (1983, NR)

This classic ‘80s film puts an average high school girl, Tami Maida (Helen Hunt) into the unlikely role of quarterback for her high school’s football team. When Tami’s dream of playing football actually comes true, it has the whole school and town talking. Her ability to handle the pressure from her family, opponents and her own teammates to come out on top makes this a must-see.

~Whale Rider (2003, PG-13)

One of the most charming and critically acclaimed films of 2003, the New Zealand hit Whale Rider effectively combines Maori tribal tradition with the timely "girl power" of a vibrant new millennium. Despite the discouragement of her gruff and disapproving grandfather (Rawiri Paratene), who nearly disowns her because she is female and therefore traditionally disqualified from tribal leadership, 12-year-old Pai (Keisha Castle-Hughes) is convinced that she is a tribal leader and sets about to prove it. Rather than inflate this story (from a novel by Witi Ihimaera) with artificial sentiment, writer-director Niki Caro develops very real and turbulent family relationships, intimate and yet torn by a collision between stubborn tradition and changing attitudes. The mythic whale rider--the ultimate symbol of Maori connection to nature--is also the harbinger of Pai's destiny, and the appealing Castle-Hughes gives a luminous, astonishingly powerful performance that won't leave a dry eye in the house. With its fresh take on a familiar tale, Whale Rider is definitely one from the heart. --Jeff Shannon

When Billie Beat Bobby (ABC) (2001, NR)

The film recreates the 1973 male versus female tennis match that was watched around the globe when Bobby Riggs (Ron Silver), a 55-year-old male tennis hustler, challenged Billie Jean King (Holly Hunter), then a 29-year-old star, to a tennis "Battle of the Sexes." The match shook the foundations of American sports by dramatically demonstrating that female professional athletes were worthy of equal respect.

DOCUMENTARIES

Champions of the World: Highlights from the 1999 Women’s World Cup (1999)

Relive the excitement from the opening match to the final penalty shootout as team USA wins the Cup in front of the home crowd. This video captures all the great goals, saves, tackles and celebrations as these 20 players fulfilled their dream of becoming World Champions.

Dare to Compete: History of Women in Sports (HBO) (1999)

The documentary explores the history of women in sports through a collection of personal stories, challenges and achievements of female athletes. Dare to Compete includes key issues in women’s sports that are often overlooked, such as racism, sexism and homophobia.

FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: The Highlights (2003)

This video takes you through the tournament step-by-step with exciting game highlights, behind the scenes footage and crowd shots that capture the passion of the event.

In the Game (1994)

Before ESPN’s The Season, there was PBS’s In the Game. This documentary takes you inside the 1993-94 season of the Stanford women’s basketball team. It is a behind-the-scenes look at the intensity and determination it takes to be an NCAA Division I basketball player and lets us peek in on the coaching style of Tara VanDerveer, who transformed Stanford into one of the top women’s basketball teams in the country.

Rocks with Wings (PBS) (2001)

Rocks with Wings is the inspiring story of how coach Jerry Richardson and the Lady Chieftains learned to overcome the differences in race, gender and cultural heritage that divided them to achieve a sense of pride and accomplishment for themselves, their team and their community.

Welcome to Our World: USAPlayers'-Eye View of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup

A behind-the-scenes look at the US Women's Soccer Team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup through the eyes of the players themselves. Available at http://www.soccerrom.com/soccermall/mall_item_detail.cfm?item_rid=1020.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 08:49 am
@Ragman,
Is this supporting Linkat's statement about movies or refuting it? I can't tell.

It's a pretty short list.

Here's a list of, whew, a lot of sports movies. (200? 300? I started counting but it'd take a long time.)

Just by surveying them, sports movies that focus on women make up a small percentage except for in "girly" sports like ice skating, gymnastics or cheerleading.

I didn't see a single one in the basketball section, for example. (The closest was "Juwanna Man," about a male basketball player who becomes a female impersonator to play on a female basketball team.)
 

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