Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 03:55 pm
@panzade,
I hear that he cut way down quite recently.
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:01 pm
@Letty,
This is the one I remember watching Smile

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y08ingivLdQ&feature=fvwrel
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:04 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
I hear that he cut way down quite recently.


I just talked to our drummer who's the head of the volunteer fire squad.He said the paramedics got on the radio to alert him that Davey had passed. Sad day.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:29 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:

I hear that he cut way down quite recently.


Well, there you go...
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:36 pm
@panzade,
Ive always heard that the Monkees never did any opf their own singing or even writing. Zat So?
The studio bands were always used as playing the bulk of much of the music we heard on hit songs
MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:47 pm
I think they did their own singing but at least in the early days there were pro musicians, but as the years went on they did their own musicianing too. At least that's what I remember. Mike Nesmith was an actual musician before the Monkees and went on to something of a solo career after. At least one other one wass, I believe, a practicing musician. Mike may also have written some of their songs. "Daydream Believer" and I think one other of their hits was/were written by John Stewart, a longtime but not original member of the Kingston Trio, who also wrote some of the later Trio's better-known songs. He also went on to a flourishing solo career. Was kind of RFK's house band before the assassination, and had a song he wrote picked up as something of a theme song by NASA.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:50 pm
Riu, Riu Chiu, a Catalan Christmas carol from before 1550, done by the Monkees some twenty years before it achieved any sort of wide notice. Pretty classy, and prescient, guys.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 04:59 pm
@MontereyJack,
It is a standard at an early music group's Christmas Mass that I attend. Their version would not be out of place.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 06:06 pm
@farmerman,
In the beginning of the show (and for those 2 hit albums) they sang only on the tracks. Later on by the end of 2nd season, they battled to allow them to play their own instruments. They were overruled by megalomaniacal producer Don Kirshner.

Mickey Dolenz was a pretty novice drummer but Tork and Nesmith were fairly experienced musicians. Kirshner had the pick of the best studio musicians and ran a tight ship. Nesmith was the rebel of the group and the most admant and pushed back to gain artistic control for the group and Kirshner and he almost came to blows in the end.

"Kirshner was hired by the producers of The Monkees to provide hitworthy songs to accompany the television program, within a demanding schedule. Kirshner quickly corralled songwriting talent from his Brill Building stable of writers and musicians to create catchy, engaging tracks which the band could pretend to perform on the show.

This move was not because of any lack of Monkee talent — Mike Nesmith and Peter Tork were already experienced musicians, and Davy Jones was an established musical performer; but as a working band they had little experience, and Micky Dolenz was completely new to drums — but to churn out ready-to-go recordings to give each new episode its own song. Each Monkee was retained for vocal duties, but they were not allowed to play on the records.

The formula worked phenomenally well: singles "Last Train to Clarksville" and "I'm a Believer"; the first two Monkees albums were produced and released in time to catch the initial wave of the television program's popularity. Future Taj Mahal and John Lennon guitarist Jesse Ed Davis sat in on guitar. After a year, the Monkees wanted another chance to all play their own instruments on the records. They also wanted additional oversight into which songs would be released as singles. Further, when word belatedly came out that the band had not played on the first season's songs, a controversy arose, and the public expressed a desire to hear the television stars perform their own music.

The matter reached a breaking point over a disagreement regarding the Neil Diamond-penned "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You" in early 1967. The song, released by Kirshner as a single without Columbia Pictures' consent, led to his dismissal. The initial B-side was replaced with a Nesmith song, performed by the Monkees, and they performed on the next year's recordings, featured in the show's second season. Monkees record sales dropped by nearly half after Kirshner's departure"
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Feb, 2012 06:27 pm
"The Wrecking Crew" an infamous band of studio musicians played the instruments on the first two Monkee's albums (and just about every other album you ever heard during that time period).
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Mar, 2012 12:44 pm
@boomerang,
Quote:
"The Wrecking Crew" an infamous band of studio musicians played the instruments on the first two Monkee's albums (and just about every other album you ever heard during that time period).


You got that right, boomer.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 04:02 am
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:

Bummer. I liked him. Oh well, if you gotta go, a heart attack is one of the best ways to do it (not so great for the family and friends, but good for the individual).


I heard heart attacks hurt like hell
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 08:16 am
@snood,
Not necessarily.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 08:44 am
@chai2,
That from personal experience?
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 09:45 am
@snood,
How about three heart attacks?

snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 09:53 am
@izzythepush,
That’s humorous. Someone said heart attacks were a good way to “go”. I was simply saying that some people who have had them have said they are very painful. I wouldn’t consider it a good death if the person experienced significant pain on the way out. That is all.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 09:54 am
@snood,
I'm not arguing, I know what you meant.

It's just a very funny clip that's all.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 10:24 am
@snood,
My husband has had a heart attack and didn't even know it until he went to the doctor for a check up and they did an EKG.

FWIW, he has a few serious heart conditions. Every day is a new adventure.

A heart attack is not automatically a chest clutching event.
Medically, just stretching ( the wrong word but I can't think of another) the heart muscle due to fluid overload is considered a heart attack.

A heart attack, more properly referred to as a myocardial infarction, covers a lot of ground.

It can go from mild to one leading to cardiac arrest, which is an electrical problem in the heart as opposed to a plumbing problem (a blockage). I suppose if your heat is weak enough, even a mild MI could lead to cardiac arrest.

I'm not denying a MI can be painful. It's just that if you go by anecdotal evidence your not going to get a full or clear picture.

snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 10:35 am
@chai2,
You like to argue, chai. Sometimes it doesn’t even make sense. Your husband’s painless heart attack is also an anecdote. Sometimes they hurt, sometimes they don’t. If a person dies by painful heart attack, I don’t consider it a “good” way to go. That isn’t an argument and doesn’t require endless commentary.
chai2
 
  0  
Reply Sat 19 Oct, 2019 03:01 pm
@snood,
I'm not arguing snood. Not at all.

I was explaining that MI can be painful to a greater or lesser extent, or not at all.
It was a direct answer to what you said, which was "I heard heart attacks were painful as hell". Period.

I gave a 2 word response.

You continued, not me, and asked me about if this was personal experience.

I imagined when you asked me you wanted a response. My answer was to show that yes I do have personal experience with this. Then I followed it up with information that you or others might find useful/informative/educational.


Your original statement was "I heard heart attacks were painful as hell"
You said nothing about "sometimes they do, sometimes they don't" at that point.
If you want to amend that statement later, then claim I'm arguing when your statement hadn't yet come up, who's making endless commentary and keeping this up? I was good with leaving it at "not necessarily".

Sometimes you just drop dead before you even know what happened to you. I wouldn't mind that, unless I were driving a car or something, and would end up hurting or killing someone else. Then again, I wouldn't know because I'd be dead.

Someone makes a comment about let's say a movie, and you know that may not be correct, and say so. Then you go on to explain the point, and give examples. Do you expect the other person to tell you that you're arguing?





 

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