jcboy
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Mar, 2012 06:45 pm
I think Obama is a great American President who deserves more respect than he will ever get from a certain segment of our country.
snood
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Mar, 2012 07:08 pm
@jcboy,
Word up
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 25 Mar, 2012 07:19 pm
@snood,
Quote:
I think his continuation of the politics of empire and military domination that were brought to the fore by George Bush deserve laser-like scrutiny to determine how much of it he could actually discontinue if he tried without any decrease in our security as a nation.


Good, that is really good, Snood. Rephrasing propaganda is an excellent way to keep it fresh and appealing to the dumb masses.

Your national security has never been in jeopardy. You have brought the tiny tiny tiny measures of jeopardy upon yourselves by allowing these war criminals to have their way with the innocent countries of the world.

Remember, Obama promised to deal with the war criminals and then he reneged because the US is going through such a tough period.

Awwwww, does that not just tug at your lil ole heartstrings.

Who knows, certainly not the ones who set out to save the oppressed, a million and a half people dead, millions with their lives wrecked, their countries in ruin and what do you want do but engage in another back patting event.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Mar, 2012 07:56 pm
@snood,
Between Obama and "all" the GOP candidates, I wonder why people are still struggling with this question? Romney, the so-called front runner is a compulsive liar. He lies upon his lies. How can anyone vote for a liar?

Most voters don't take promises made during campaigns too seriously, but Romney's lies upon lies should indicate that he cannot be trusted.

I watched part of this Rachel Maddow show when it was on last week.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9K79AUzgQc
snood
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Mar, 2012 06:29 am
@cicerone imposter,
Yeah, I don't take people seriously who say they would vote for Romney because of the way he views things, or his policies. Simply because the man doesn't stand on any issue the same way twice. But I don't wonder why the election between them will still be close. It's the irrational "take our country back from that guy who's not one of us" that's fueling the GOP's "thinking".
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Mar, 2012 10:46 am
@snood,
"Irrational" is the right word; the GOP House members are now promoting their budget that will cut Medicare, cut government spending by 20%, and give more tax breaks to the wealthy and corporations.

I'm more than sure that many republicans (over 50%) depend on social security and Medicare for their living, but they would vote for their party based on nothing more than all the lies they spread about Obama.

There's no cure .....

0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Tue 27 Mar, 2012 02:30 am
@H2O MAN,
Is it just me, or does anyone else think H2O man plays with poop?
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Tue 27 Mar, 2012 11:07 am
@glitterbag,
I think he lives in that stuff!
0 Replies
 
EqualityFLSTPete
 
  2  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2012 07:21 am
@H2O MAN,


This guy reminds me of your typical racist white trash republican.

Obama has my vote!
Below viewing threshold (view)
jcboy
 
  5  
Reply Mon 2 Apr, 2012 06:56 pm
According to Mitt Romney, Barack Obama cannot run on his record. I agree with Mitt. If Romney wants to have any chance of winning, Obama cannot run on his record of ending 2 wars that were bankrupting us, repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell", saving the auto industry, and repairing the economy that was so badly damaged during 8 years of our last Republican president. It seems the biggest complaint Republicans can muster right now is that the recovery isn't "fast enough." Sorry, assholes, you're just being desperate. Why not switch to calling him a Muslim negro and claiming he was born in Africa?
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 08:27 am
Just a few thoughts about Obama, his campaign and his presidency:
I was so disappointed in his performance in the first debate against Romney that I really couldn’t even put it into words at first. I have much respect for the man’s intellect and grasp of issues, so my mind kept circling back to try to see a strategy or at least some method to the madness. But the several conclusions I have finally been left with are not positive...

I think Obama was arrogant to think he could simply state his canned, pre-planned policy statements and not engage Romney in real time, about the statements Romney was making while standing across the stage from him. If Obama and his team had any strategy at all, it was obviously to just run out the clock, and sit on the lead they had.

I don’t think, like a lot of Obama’s detractors think, that the arrogance and disdain in display toward Romney’s candidacy is a core definer of Obama. I think it’s a character defect of his that crops up occasionally – a part of him that doesn’t really serve his purposes as a leader and statesman; one of those things (that we all have to one degree or another) that make him human that he needs to work on.

I have ongoing anger at him and his candidacy for not being stronger and bolder about smacking down the constant dissembling and outright lies that come from the Romney/Ryan campaign. I mean, six days after the shellacking he got by Romney, his campaign comes out with a derisive commercial with Big Bird in it? Really? Big Bird? That, to me seemed so incompetent and useless. I can’t figure out why everyone but Obama and his handlers see the absolute need to swiftly and forcefully answer the deceptions of Romney (his backpedaling on the 47%, his constant revisions of his tax plan, his dodges about everything).

I see a lack of energy in him lately that is concerning. I wonder if he is suffering from burnout. Contrary to what his detractors say about his work ethic, I think he works pretty hard, and I wonder if it’s just caught up with him at the absolute worst time. He has been anything but inspiring in the last few weeks, and I’m hoping there’s not something behind the scenes splitting his attention too thinly.

He needs to forget trying to “rope-a-dope” in the next debate, and go on and engage head-on this mealy mouthed dissembler he’s up against.

He ain’t perfect, but in my opinion he’s head, shoulders and torso above the alternative. I want him to address some things in his second term that he let slide in the first, and I don’t want to wake up to four years of Bush junior on steroids.
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 09:24 am
I admit it has been a little disheartening listening to everybody going on about Romney's debate performance. Even more disheartening reading the new poll numbers with Romney slight going over the edge.

However, I get encouraged again when I see pictures like this.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2012/10/10/us/desm1/desm1-articleLarge.jpg

Quote:
A day after some national polls showed President Obama’s edge over Mitt Romney evaporating, he responded first thing on Tuesday with a new commercial featuring Big Bird of “Sesame Street” and Mr. Romney’s debate-night vow to cut financing for PBS.

It did not exactly take flight.

The creators of “Sesame Street” had asked Mr. Obama to leave Big Bird out of it. And even some Democrats said the ad, suggesting that Mr. Romney would be tougher on “Sesame Street” than on Wall Street, was not the salve that nervous party activists and volunteers were looking for.

“The right message is that on Friday, we saw great economic news,” said Brian Moran, the chairman of the Virginia Democratic Party, referring to new data showing that the national unemployment rate fell to 7.8 percent in September. “Things are moving in the right direction. That’s where the focus should be, and not on the debate.”

Big Bird was part of a broader effort by Mr. Obama and his team to reassure supporters — many of whom were confident a week ago that the election was all but assured — that his campaign had not lost its intensity or focus. By later in the day, Mr. Obama was delivering a spirited campaign appearance in Columbus, Ohio, his aides were reaching out to big donors with a calming message that they had always expected a tight finish, and the campaign had released new ads in battleground states on issues like potential cuts to Medicaid.

The Big Bird ad may not have inspired universal confidence among Democrats. But if nothing else, they said, any sense of complacency in their ranks was now gone.

“Certainly, you’re not hearing anyone out here saying this is in the bag, and you were beginning to get that sense,” Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado said in an interview. “Dire is the wrong word, but I do think it is a wake-up call.”

Speaking at a rally in Columbus late Tuesday, Mr. Obama accused Mr. Romney of showing “salesmanship” but “not leadership,” telegraphing a new line of attack that Mr. Obama’s aides hoped would help to bolster his supporters.

Inside Mr. Obama’s Chicago headquarters, senior advisers had already worked to calm younger staff members by counseling them to tune out the natural, if jarring, gyrations of a closely fought presidential race. Supportive Democratic governors were doing the same on Tuesday. “Did we forget no-drama Obama?” Gov. Brian Schweitzer of Montana asked in an interview, reprising the go-steady slogan of Mr. Obama’s 2008 effort.

After a Pew Research Center poll on Monday that suggested Mr. Romney’s debate performance had helped him erase Mr. Obama’s lead nationally, a Gallup survey released Tuesday showed a similar result, with the candidates statistically tied.

But polls in battleground states appeared to show the race to be back where it was before Mr. Obama went on a run, and Mr. Romney stumbled, after their party conventions, with Mr. Obama for the most part holding slight but shrinking edges in surveys, within their margins of sampling of error.

A new CNN poll of likely voters in Ohio showed the president to have a four-point advantage. (A Quinnipiac University/New York Times/CBS News poll and a Washington Post poll before the debate had shown a lead for Mr. Obama of 8 to 10 percentage points.)

And a new survey by WMUR and the New Hampshire University Survey Center showed Mr. Obama to have a 6-point lead in the state, down from 15 points a week ago.

Officials at the pro-Obama “super PAC” Priorities USA Action, and at unions including the AFL-CIO, said that the electoral battleground, and their plans to tackle it, have not changed.

“You can’t deny that he could have done a lot better in the debate and that would have continued the confidence people had in the outcome,” said Mike Podhorzer, the AFL-CIO’s political director. “But in terms of what we do, which is we only focus on the ground, people are committed and are still committed because the economic issues and choices are so stark.”


more at the source
sozobe
 
  3  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 09:45 am
@revelette,
I'm JUST out of sight in that photo! (If the bottom of the photo wasn't cropped, I'd be there.)

It was really fun, a good rally. He did great.

Oh, and guess who signed my daughter's cast?

Yep!

She's thrilled.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 10:19 am
@sozobe,
What can I say, but WOW! Congrats.
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  3  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 01:35 pm
@sozobe,
I bet that was a really nice experience, encouraging too. Did it seem like he was ready for round two?
sozobe
 
  3  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 01:46 pm
@revelette,
It did!

He looked tired close-up, but he also looked determined and brought the fire when he needed it.
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 02:03 pm
@sozobe,
Good. Also glad you had that experience.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 02:46 pm
@revelette,
Thank you!

For what it's worth, here's my take on recent developments:

Before the first debate, I wrote a note to myself so that something was time-stamped about what I thought would happen. I thought that a) Obama wouldn't do that well, compared to expectations, and that b) the media would seize on this as a game-changer. Remember that right before the debates happened it was starting to look inevitable for Obama. People were starting to utter the "L" word. (Landslide.) Etc.

This is boring. It's not what sells newspapers and gets page views. The media really, really likes a horserace (that is, a nail-biter rather than a clear path to victory).

So, Obama did worse yet than I expected, but the broad outlines are there. He also didn't do nearly as badly as the conventional wisdom would have it, and a I think a lot of the garment-rending and hair-tearing is feeding into a narrative that he utterly, epically tanked (he didn't, he missed opportunities but he didn't, like, choke, standing there stuttering or unable to speak or whatever).

So, whether Romney will have another 47% moment or whether things will just slide back slowly towards Obama, I do think that Obama will improve from here.

Things could still happen to skew that of course -- economics news, foreign policy happenings, an unforced error (really bad gaffe, not just a lackluster debate performance), etc.

But when I saw Obama breaking away I did have the thought that the media would seize on the next "game changer," and it did.

I think this all worked to Obama's advantage in the primaries, by the way. When Hillary was the presumptive nominee, that was boring, and this upstart Obama was interesting. Through positive action from Obama (a great campaigner, a great campaign) and negative action from Hillary (a so-so campaigner, a really messed-up campaign), the leg up offered by the media at the beginning became something sustainable. I don't think there is really an equivalent with Romney, especially because much of the early problem with Obama is that many people liked him a lot but didn't think it was possible that he could win. Once it became a real possibility, that snowballed. Whereas Romney is nominee purely because people think he was the most likely out of the possibilities to win, while they don't really like him that much.

The point is, I don't think this is a media bias thing -- that the media is biased for or against Democrats or Republicans. I think the media is biased against boring stuff, and makes "interest" whether it is organically there or not.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 02:52 pm
@sozobe,
Good points, soz. Mr. Green

Obama has stability and consistency, and he's still "liked" by most people over Romney.

When past elections have been won by "a better face/smile" or "voter turnout," these are not going to play the same impact it did in the past. Even with the GOP games at voter suppression.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
So....Will Biden Be VP? - Question by blueveinedthrobber
My view on Obama - Discussion by McGentrix
Obama/ Love Him or Hate Him, We've Got Him - Discussion by Phoenix32890
Obama fumbles at Faith Forum - Discussion by slkshock7
Expert: Obama is not the antichrist - Discussion by joefromchicago
Obama's State of the Union - Discussion by maxdancona
Demand a plan - Discussion by H2O MAN
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Obama 2012?
  3. » Page 2
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 08/09/2020 at 03:07:53