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Mexican decendent entering usa with a tourist passport

 
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 10:07 pm
I think Canadian's have to use a passport to get into Mexico and vice versa. I'm not sure about a Visa, I didn't need one to get into Mexico. Funnily enough, although I do know a few Mexicans living here, there aren't that many. I don't think they find the cold all that appealing.
A few years ago, I traveled between the USA, Mexico, Belize. I had to go through the US customs 6 times, Mexican once. I was searched every single time. I got to the point were I now assume I will be searched every time I cross the border. I do not have a criminal record or a funky name...

I'm curious though, were the draft dodgers treated better or worse in Mexico. I knew a few Vietnam vets\ draft dodgers, it was kind of before my time, most of them were pretty badly scared (emotionally) from the whole experience. Of the few I knew, 1\2 killed themselves, suicide. Not because they were treated badly here, but because most had fought and didn't want to take on a second or third tour and were not welcomed on their own turf when they returned from battle. They were considered lower than dirt. They couldn't live with the shame or the memories and they could never go home again. Very sad.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 10:21 pm
@fbaezer,
Which brings up our friend, Pantalones - do you know how he is doing?

And there was the earlier guy (name failing me but I could figure it out), last I knew in the Netherlands.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 02:26 pm
@Ceili,
Until about 2 years ago, Mexicans didn't need a visa to get as tourists into Canada. Then the Canadian government changed its policy, because there were a few hundred Mexicans who went to Canada as tourists, argued that they were being politically harassed in Mexico, got the status of political refugees (I suppose Canada helps them somehow) and it was found out they were not harassed in Mexico.
Canada decided to change its visa policy rather than to change its "no questions asked" policy when someone asks for political assilum.
The result? A huge drop in Mexican tourism, which is by no means negligible. Canadian tourism operators have complained against their government's decision. I guess they'll drop the visa requirement in a couple of years, or so.
Canadians do need a passport to get into Mexico (you see, we are doormats only to Gringos), but no visa. There were talks of a "retaliating visa" for Canadians in the Mexican Congress, but they led to nothing.
It's relatively easy for a Mexican to get a working visa for Canada. Either you are invited in a Bi-National program (Canada has thousands of Mexican seasonal "guest-workers" every year, mostly in the timber industry) or you apply, and get the visa by demonstrating either that you have either a job offering or constant savings in Canada during 2 years.

Osso, about the young Tijuanenses... Pantalones was doing fine (at least in Google+) a few weeks ago, posting fun and nerdish stuff. And El-Pohl, I guess he must have married the French girl.




fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 02:34 pm
@Ceili,
On the second part of your post, Vietnam draft dodgers.
I read that those who took refuge in Canada had a lot of trouble getting back to the States. Strangely, those who went to Mexico didn't have it. Perhaps those in Canada were in some sort of refugee status and those in Mexico were decades-long "tourists".
I know one draft dodger who studied medicine in Guadalajara, and then worked as a doctor for the big American retiree community down there. Never went back, except to visit family. This guy was briefly a lodger at my mom's apartments, he had a cat who we inadvertedly locked inside a storage room the moment he had to leave, so he left it to us. The cat was named "Pequeño Magober" (Little McGovern, pronounced by a Spaniard), because he was "Gringo, blond, and a born loser".
Other Gringo draft dodgers in Mexico I met were all quite adjusted living here. One is a famous photographer, worked for Time-Life and, every now and then, people confuse him with Eric Clapton. We used to sit nearby at the baseball stadium.
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 02:53 pm
@fbaezer,
A really good friend of mine married a Mexican. His brothers can't understand why he came to Canada, they live in Texas. He loves it here. I went to his citizenship ceremony a few years ago.
I remember all the kerfuffle over the refugees from Mexico. Some of them, I believe, were genuine. A few journalists and so on were found to be in danger upon return from the drug cartels. As is always the case, there will be fraud. It would have probably have been in their favour if they had just gone through the regular channels as opposed to trying for refugee status. It's hard to prove hardship if you're wealthy. Every year, many Americans try the same game - think Randy Quaid.
When I was in Mexico a few years ago, I went to a fancy shmancy wedding in Cuernavaca (I hope I spelled that right). I was surprised how many people told me they or their children were educated up here. Mind you, there were mostly in Montreal or Toronto, not in the flat lands where I live.
I hope the Visa thing tanks here as well. I think the disparity of Canadians travelling to Mexico is probably the reason we don't need visas. I was told once, and it's probably true, that Visas are mostly tit-for-tat. A shame really.
I do know that many of the tourism/hospitality students want/need to spend a semester up here, for work experience towards their degree. I remember a girl who I worked with in the Okanagan, she was surprised at the number of flowers she saw up here. She, of course, like so many people in this world, thought it would be cold 24/7. Ironically, when I have visited Mexico, I was surprised at how few flowers I saw. I expected the country to be in non-stop bloom. Goes to show that we can all learn a lot from each other.
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 03:04 pm
@fbaezer,
Interesting. I do know that every attempt by deserting soldiers in this last go around were stymied by Canadian authorities. I think the US made such a stink during and after the Vietnam debacle that our Conservative government, or American lap-dogs, were doing their best to suck up. I'm sure they'd see it differently though.
Like I said, I knew a bunch, mostly living in the gulf islands. Most of them kept their records quiet and lived under assumed names. They made fine Hippies. Smile
War is truly ugly.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 03:11 pm
@CalamityJane,
Since the second time I did it, I'm quite fast in filling it out: the whole procedure didn't last longer than a few minutes - but it was free ntil recently, now it costs $$
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 07:43 pm
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

A really good friend of mine married a Mexican. His brothers can't understand why he came to Canada, they live in Texas.


The ones I can't understand are his brothers.
Texas?????
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 08:15 pm
@fbaezer,
fbaezer wrote:

The result? A huge drop in Mexican tourism, which is by no means negligible.


by this, do you mean travel from Mexico to Canada?

Mexicans account for between 2 and 3% of tourist numbers in Canada. That's with a slight recent increase.

http://en-corporate.canada.travel/research/statistics-figures/international-visitor-arrivals#international

fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 08:21 pm
@ehBeth,
Yes, tourists from Mexico to Canada.

I read a couple of news dispatches about Canadian tourism operators complaining about the visas and saying that the number of Mexican tourists dropped substantially.

The data you linked proves them wrong. And proves me wrong, too.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 08:26 pm
@fbaezer,
I was puzzled when you said it. I don't see many tourists from Mexico here in Toronto, so thought they must be travelling to some other part of the country. Checked the stats and they aren't.

I dance with several women from Mexico. We've talked about the visa situation several times. Tourism's never come up as a topic. The visas are invariably for their moms to come and visit.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2012 10:31 pm
@ehBeth,
Totally aside, but that's my way. I was on a train to Cremona, I think, and there was a stop at Piacenza. Don't trust me on the routes. A bunch of women from Mexico climbed into our car, and we talked as we could, me with the woman who best spoke english, me with brutal spanish. Where to stay in Florence. (aiiiii). I don't think I helped them (ask at the stazione) but at least they got a stupid woman being friendly.

I'd also, years before, spent a goodly five hours at the late not lamented airport in Milan, Malpensa, just about empty, except for the Mexican tourists, who tended to sing.
We were already exhausted and I figure the people from Mexico were too.
The good part is that is where I first tasted a good coffee.
0 Replies
 
 

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