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Wanting to move to London?

 
 
Reply Tue 12 Oct, 2010 03:32 pm
Hi all!

So I am hoping to move to London next year, after I graduate from college. I'm planning on studying for a Masters degree while I'm there. Through my research, I've found that moving to the UK as an American can be rather difficult.

So instead, I will be obtaining an Irish passport. My father is an Irish citizen, born in Ireland, so I am eligible to apply for one.

So what I'm trying to make sure is: I won't need to apply for a visa once I have an EU passport, right? Also, in what other ways will the irish citizenship benefit me?
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 2,278 • Replies: 12
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margo
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Oct, 2010 11:50 pm
@tangerinetrees,
does the new passport come with an Irish accent?
saab
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Oct, 2010 12:57 am
@tangerinetrees,
There is not such a thing as an EU passport. EU is not a country - hopefully never.

When you have an Irish passport and wants go back to work in USA you might have to have a green card. working permit or what ever. Better find out about that. Or if you can have two passports - not all countries allow that.
tangerinetrees
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Oct, 2010 03:02 pm
@margo,
haha I wish! Perhaps spending a year in London could help get rid of this horrible California/Valley Girl accent I've been cursed with!
tangerinetrees
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Oct, 2010 03:05 pm
@saab,
Thats funny that you mention that - my dad said the same thing, almost verbatim (about EU passports) I know that the EU is not a country. What I meant by that was a passport of a country belonging to the EU, in my case, Ireland. But thanks for your response, I'll have to look into what you mentioned. Smile
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Oct, 2010 11:13 pm
@tangerinetrees,
I know an American girl who studied at KingĀ“s College. There is a difference in moving to London, emigrating or studying. If you can prove that you are accepted at a university and want to study it must be much easier to get to GB.
Contact the British Consulate.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  2  
Reply Thu 14 Oct, 2010 12:32 pm
@tangerinetrees,
The U.S. allows dual citizenship. You could be citizen of both the U.S. and Ireland.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Oct, 2010 03:24 am
@tangerinetrees,
tangerinetrees wrote:

haha I wish! Perhaps spending a year in London could help get rid of this horrible California/Valley Girl accent I've been cursed with!


I doubt that very much. You would just end up sounding like a Valley Girl who thinks she sounds "English". I know Americans who have spent 50 years in Britain and they still have very recognisable American accents.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Oct, 2010 12:28 pm
@contrex,
Dick Van Dyke anyone for a cockney accent in Mary Poppins?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Oct, 2010 01:44 pm
@talk72000,
talk72000 wrote:

Dick Van Dyke anyone for a cockney accent in Mary Poppins?


That attempt at a Cockney accent is famous among British people as an example of a really bad fake Cockney accent. Brits are alternately amused and irritated at American vanity in assuming they can just pick up our speech sounds. Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, Rene Zellweger, Drew Barrymore, Annette Bening and Meryl Streep are just some examples.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 01:42 pm
@contrex,
There was this guy in Tom Selleck's show Higginsbottom or something who spoke with a British accent but was a Texan. He was good. I thought he was British.
0 Replies
 
tangerinetrees
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Oct, 2010 07:23 pm
I don't plan on developing an "english" accent. Though I make fun of my accent, I'm fine with it and I think that anyone that tries to change their accent after living somewhere for a short period of time, ie Madonna is absolutely ridiculous.

Over time, accents can and do change. My dad has been living in America for 20 years and his Irish accent, which was once quite strong, is nearly undetectable now. On the other end, I have family who moved to Ireland as teenagers, have lived there for 15 years and now have Irish accents. Their accents aren't fake or put on. It does take considerable time, but it does happen.
Smile
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 01:33 pm
@tangerinetrees,
You do acquire accents unintentially if exposed to a culture for any length of time. What we hear we tend to repeat subconsciously.
0 Replies
 
 

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