23
   

Australia, we don’t know you, but we love you, say our American friends

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:51 pm
@dlowan,
Sorry?
I'm not sure what you wish they wouldn't do from my post, Deb.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 12:10 am
@msolga,
Foreign leaders attempt Australian accents.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 12:14 am
@dlowan,
Yes, I can see what you're saying.
It often doesn't work out well. Wink
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 03:22 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
What some are calling Usians are people from The United States of America. I suppose they and the rest of the world back in the 1700s could have decided to use terms like United Staters or Staters , but they didn't. They used Americans and the rest of the world didn't howl or probably even comment upon it.

Actually it was the UKians - I mean Brits - no I mean English people (because I don't think Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland had a hand in it) who named people native to the colonies which became the United States of America - 'Americans'.

Quote:
16th-century European usage of American denoted the native inhabitants of the New World.[8] The earliest recorded use of this term in English is in Thomas Hacket's 1568 translation of André Thévet's book on France Antarctique; Thévet himself had referred to the natives as Ameriques.[8] In the following century the term was extended to European settlers and their descendants in the Americas. The earliest recorded use of this term in English dates to 1648, in Thomas Gage's The English-American: A New Survet of the West Indies.[8] In English, "American" was used especially for people in the British America, and came to be applied to citizens of the United States when the country was formed.[8]
[/b]


Quote:
Use of the term American for U.S. nationals is common in United Nations. The Secretary General refers to people from the United States as Americans, as has the UN High Commissioner for Refugees.[19][20] The UN has referred to financial markets in the United States as "American financial markets."


Somebody better tell this guy that Americans don't want or deserve to hog the word 'American' for themselves anymore.

And then they can come up with a new term that cognates across all these languages too when he's making his speeches - just to avoid any confusion.

Quote:
The Spanish, French, Portuguese, German, and Italian languages use cognates of the word "American", in denoting "U.S. citizen".
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 02:45 pm
@aidan,
aidan wrote:

Actually it was the UKians - I mean Brits - no I mean English people (because I don't think Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland had a hand in it) who named people native to the colonies which became the United States of America - 'Americans'.

All the more reason not to make a big deal of the term being used.


Quote:
Use of the term American for U.S. nationals is common in United Nations. The Secretary General refers to people from the United States as Americans, as has the UN High Commissioner for Refugees.[19][20] The UN has referred to financial markets in the United States as "American financial markets."


Ditto

Somebody better tell this guy that Americans don't want or deserve to hog the word 'American' for themselves anymore.

Do you really believe that the majority of Americans don't want to be referred to as Americans?

As for deserving it? What's to deserve? It's just a moniker and every nation in The Americas have there own, and none want to use American.

When people in the UN and around the world speak of Americans, everyone knows who they mean. There is no confusion.
FOUND SOUL
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 02:56 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Thanks for the offer:) I hope to get to meet all my American friends when that day arrives and I'll be sure to PM you...

I wouldn't wear that top in a pink fit lols, only because well, we don't wear our own here, don't blame your friend but I get that you would find it sharp and cool..

Only the true blue Aussies call women Sheilas... Birds is the one I don't like:)

Nicole Kidman can pull off a Southern Accent very well by the way..

See I was a little off topic so to speak when I wrote the last post, must have missed all the other pages and followed through from page one lols, sorry about that guys.
Dutchy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 03:29 pm
@FOUND SOUL,
I do think the Americans really love us! http://www.news.com.au/national/taxpayers-wear-burden-of-60000-illegal-immigrants/story-e6frfkvr-1226200664868
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 06:56 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:
Here's another recent article, one on how another outsider sees Oz.

*******************************************************************

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/55044000/jpg/_55044288_011406354-1.jpg
Cate Blanchett Cate Blanchett: One of Australia's most famous exports?

*******************************************************************


Nicole Kidman is very good looking, but Cate Blanchett is stunningly beautiful.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 08:39 pm
@wandeljw,
Excuse me if I didnt ask sooner, but is Australia having some issue with self esteem?
They should just go get a pet doggie and shut the **** up.
I got my own problems fa Crissakes.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 08:43 pm
@farmerman,
Goodness me! Surprised

I heard someone, on another thread, refer to Oz as suffering from "small country syndrome"
That may well be right.
Because we are a small, not terribly important country in the grand scheme of things, sometimes struggling for a bit of independence.
But I think most Oz folk on this thread were kinda trying to respond to the thread topic.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 08:57 pm
@msolga,
****, I cant find the irony button . Thisll have to do Razz
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 09:11 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Excuse me if I didnt ask sooner, but is Australia having some issue with self esteem?
They should just go get a pet doggie and shut the **** up.
I got my own problems fa Crissakes.


Do you love us?


msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 09:12 pm
@farmerman,
You were being ironic? Surprised

Damn, farmer. Please ignore my last response!

I didn't mean a word of it! Wink
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 09:28 pm
@msolga,
nada
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Nov, 2011 09:34 pm
@farmerman,
okie dokie .

No wucking furries. Smile

or

no wuckers

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=wucking%20furries

0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2011 01:00 am
@dlowan,
We love you all. . .desperately!
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2011 02:06 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Awwwwwwwww........
0 Replies
 
Dutchy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2011 02:10 am
@Lustig Andrei,
I salute you Andrei.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2011 02:14 am
@Dutchy,
And I salute you right back, mate. Fair dinkum?
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2011 02:15 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
I said:
Quote:
Actually it was the UKians - I mean Brits - no I mean English people (because I don't think Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland had a hand in it) who named people native to the colonies which became the United States of America - 'Americans'.


To which you responded:
Quote:
All the more reason not to make a big deal of the term being used.


Yeah - I know - that's why I wrote that.

Then I wrote:
Quote:
Somebody better tell this guy that Americans don't want or deserve to hog the word 'American' for themselves anymore.


To which you responded:
Quote:
Do you really believe that the majority of Americans don't want to be referred to as Americans?

No - I was being sarcastic. I've never heard of any Americans not wanting to be called Americans. I learned of that here first, on this thread.

Quote:
As for deserving it? What's to deserve? It's just a moniker and every nation in The Americas have there own, and none want to use American.

Actually, I was thinking about it and I actually have decided that it makes sense to me that the United States of America is called 'America' and people who live there and are citizens either by birth or because they emigrated from other countries, HAVE earned the term 'American' because they illustrate and reflect the experimental, pioneering and adventurous spirit of Amerigo Vespucci, the Italian explorer for which the 'new world' was named.
Yeah - I think it fits really well.
Quote:
When people in the UN and around the world speak of Americans, everyone knows who they mean. There is no confusion.

Again, I know this. I was joking.

Finn - did you know I am 'American'? And that actually my ancestors came from Ireland and Scotland at the end of the 18th century and pioneered out to Texas? Here's a picture of them. The little boy in the striped shirt on the left was my paternal grandfather.
I'd like to hear someone tell him he can't be called an 'American' just as much as my great-great grandmother who was 50% Cherokee:

http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k46/aidan_010/hearnfamily.jpg

Anyway - back to the topic of the thread. I believe it was wandl who said Nicole Kidman could do a good southern accent. I think she does American accents in general very, very well. She doesn't do the stock flat, nasally, everyone sounds like a midwesterner thing. Naomi Watts is very good at playing Americans too.
Funny thing is - I have people over here asking me if I'm Australian because of the way I talk! Sometimes Ireland too - and I'm from NEW JERSEY! That just makes me laugh and laugh.
Yeah - also think Nicole Kidman was strikingly beautiful in a very fresh-faced sort of way.
Bottom line - I think Americans and Australians probably have very similar mindsets and lived similar lifestyles settling their wild countries. I bet alot of Australian families have pictures of their ancestors that look just like this.
Maybe we're at the core, the same type of pioneering stock, sort of kindred spirits.
I know I'd love to visit there some day. I think I'd be stunned and blown away by the space and sense of freedom- same way I feel everytime I travel out west of in the United States.
 

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