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Hello- does anyone here know of any schools that offer online degrees in Illustration & Cartooning?

 
 
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 03:25 pm
Hello. I already have a degree in Animation/Film - I want to get a second one in Illustration and Cartooning. I was trying to find out if my old school have an online degree program in Illustration of if I can take contiuing education classes in Illustration/Cartooning online - unfortunately they don't.

So far the only schools I can find that offer online degree programs in Illustration and Cartooning is:

http://www.academyart.edu/ep/cartoon-school/index.html

and the only oher schools that offer anything close I can find is listed here:

http://degreedirectory.org/articles/Online_Cartooning_Schools_and_Classes_Your_Questions_Answered.html
http://education-portal.com/cartooning.html
http://education-portal.com/related_pages/q_p/page/1/q_p/cartooning.html

I am trying to find schools that offer online degree programs SPECIFICALLY IN ILLUSTRATION AND CARTOONING. The SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS DOES NOT HAVE AN ONLINE DEGREE PROGRAM FOR THIS.

Can someone please help me out with this? Please help- thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 2,279 • Replies: 10
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Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 03:35 pm
@JGoldman10,
Lately every time I see your topics pop up I burst into song.




Sometimes I am able to go a little to another standard

0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 03:39 pm
@JGoldman10,
What do you want? Do you want to get a degree in cartooning, or do you want to write a book?

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 03:46 pm
@JGoldman10,
This is from an Australian website.


What will distinguish us from other methods of cartooning tuition is that we tackle cartooning more from an 'ideas' point of view than 'how-to-draw'. If another Cartooning school can't answer, or doesn't make a feature of the question "How do cartoonists think of jokes?", come back here.


Why? Because if you're not funny, you're not published.

Cartooning is not a process where you succeed in drawing and THEN succeed in cartooning, If you can't tell a story, you're not going to succeed! People look at cartoons to be entertained, not to be impressed by a drawing.


This is why cartoonists with simple drawing styles are more popular than those with highly illustrated styles.


Our approach is geared towards having you produce one-off, gag cartoons because these form the foundation of any further activity in Cartooning you're likely to pursue. A cartoon drawing without an idea behind it isn't really cartooning (as far as we're concerned) so right from the start, let's be clear - there's more emphasis in our package on ideas than drawing.


How do you teach drawing?


Well, drawing is addressed but basically, whether or not it's important is a question of observation.

What we've observed over the years is that the most successful cartoon strips in history have been drawn with simple, childish styles. The most successful cartoonist in history? Arguably the man who drew dots for eyes! Click here for the Wikipedia entry. The most successful cartoonist in Australian history? Click here for his site. If you don't agree with this approach, well ... that's fine, there are plenty of sites to cater for a "drawing approach".


What's going on is that people look at cartoons to be entertained, not impressed by a drawing. In other words you don't have to succeed as an artist before you succeed in cartooning!

Cartooning is different from traditional art forms. In cartooning, the drawing is a vehicle for the idea and people are remarkably tolerant of simple, childish styles. Hmm, sounds a bit like abstract art. Let's move on.


How old?


This is a tricky one because of an artificial division in our society called 'kids' and 'adults' and the implication that something you would teach to kids is of no value to adults and vice verca. Every time we encounter this we tell people that in that sense, the approach we take to cartooning is like the rules of chess. Chess can be effectively taught to people as young as 8 or 9 and to an adult. There is no question that adults won't benefit from this tuition though - one of Australia's most awarded cartoonists, Eric Loebbecke, was one who attended one of the first series of Ian Dalkin's Cartooning Workshops during the 1980s.


Life experience enhances your ability to generate (and understand) humour, so a 10 year old will probably produce simpler ideas than a 15 y.o. and the 15 y.o. will probably produce simpler ideas than a 20 y.o.


There's no one rule to cover this situation though. Let's just say that it's a bit of a curve - there are fewer people at age 10 who benefit from tuition than at 12, and fewer at 12 than at 15. When we ran the National Cartooning Competition, our experience was that kids as young as 8 or 9 were producing very good gag cartoons based on an earlier version of the resource but we didn't start to see 'better' gags untill about age 10/11/12.




Looks like they want to sell you some software. Do you want to give them some of your money? I think you should.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 04:36 pm
@izzythepush,
BOTH. I want to further my art training- it will help me with get my comics developed.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 04:41 pm
@JGoldman10,
If you put as much effort into writing books as you put into writing threads, you'd have something by now. If you start a cartooning course, won't that just be an excuse to put it off even more?
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 04:44 pm
@izzythepush,
Going online and getting some help with developing ideas has nothing to do with going back to school or taking contuniung education course or taking other art courses. There was a local art school offering art courses that I took registered classes at few years ago but it shut down.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 04:59 pm
@JGoldman10,
JGoldman10 wrote:

Going online and getting some help with developing ideas has nothing to do with going back to school or taking contuniung education course or taking other art courses. There was a local art school offering art courses that I took registered classes at few years ago but it shut down.


Do you think the two facts are connected in some way?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 05:42 pm
@JGoldman10,
JGoldman10 wrote:

Going online and getting some help with developing ideas has nothing to do with going back to school or taking contuniung education course or taking other art courses. There was a local art school offering art courses that I took registered classes at few years ago but it shut down.


The school was shut down because the lady who was running it is now enrolled as a full-time student.
0 Replies
 
Aldistar
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 08:13 pm
I cannot really give you any pointers on online schools. Frankly, I think a great deal of them out there are scams so be careful and do your research.

I do know that The Joe Kubert School that I graduated from offers correspondence courses. You purchase a kit that gives you a lesson plan, you draw it out and send it back and one of the instructors will critique it and send it back. There are several levels. The school is all about comic book illustration and cartooning.

Here is there website
http://www.kubertschool.edu/
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Jul, 2011 09:04 pm
@Aldistar,
Thank you for responding. I got a package from the Kubert School in the mail.

0 Replies
 
 

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