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Dogs

 
 
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 04:21 am
Is it possible to train a dog not to lunge after cars when we are walking on the footpath? My friends dog, a terrier of some sort, constantly wants to chase the cars passing in the street when she is on the lead. and also she seems to run up to men but not women that she doesn't know! Help!
 
Setanta
 
  4  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 04:46 am
@Serenacutie7,
Yes, it is possible. However, it is neither easy nor quick. You will want to take your dog to obediance training classes, complete the first course, go on to the next, complete that, etc. The dog obviously does not consider the human to be in charge, and therefore, doesn't mind. Only training can cure that. If the person concerned can't effect the training, then they need to get outside, professional help.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 04:53 am
@Serenacutie7,
As a dog owner, I agree 100% with what Setanta wrote. This is called learning to 'alpha' (as relates to the dog). Terriers are somewhat harder to train (about chasing) than other breeds but are not by any means untrainable. Better your friend go to a good obedience school sooner rather than later. Their life with the dog will improve immensely. Howebver, if they opt NOT to get (re-)trained, the dog could rule their life and, worse yet, could endanger themslves.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 06:31 am
@Ragman,
"The Dog WHisperer" on Nat Geographic Channel is really a good example of using the alpha dog concept to modify a dogs behavior. As the host says"You have to retrain the owner, not the dog"

Its a good show and he takes on some real basket cases of dog behavior.

None of that "WALKIES" ****
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 06:36 am
@farmerman,
In numerous other posts (on dogs and dog training) I give credit to the Dog Whisperer's words. He provides excellent entertainment and valuable behavioral info to a large group of dog lovers. I see that 90% of the time the issues are how unproductive or 'problem' human behavior influences problem dog behavior -- perhaps 100%.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 06:41 am
People are always so amazed when he shows up, and, in most cases, can affect the dog's behavior immediately. It's amazing to me that so many people don't understand the principle of who's the boss. I was at the beach with the little dogs yesterday. When i call them, they come. Another guy was there with his giant poodle, and when the poodle ran off to join some other ill-controlled dogs who were attempting to bully the other dogs there--he called his dog, and he called his dog, and he called his dog . . . the dog came back when he got bored with the action further down the beach.

I make the dogs sit when we come to a street corner. I tell them "pay attention," and we don't move until they are sitting and looking at me. We don't have any of that running into the street and chasing cars ****, because i won't have it, and in the past, i've turned right around and gone home because of inattention on their part. I was only obliged to do that twice, and that was for the girl dog, and it was also about seven or eight years ago. Now, i have more trouble getting the boy dog to pay attention. He's fourteen, and probably getting a little senile. I suspect he's developing a "yeah, yeah, i know" attitude. But we don't cross the street until both dogs are sitting and paying attention.
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 06:50 am
I find that when I point to something that I want the dog to notice, he just stares at my finger.
Does he need a few more brain cells switched on, or should I just get a longer finger?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 06:55 am
@Old Goat,
Now, i know you're going to think i'm crazy, but i point with my foot, and if my foot is close enough, the dog gets the message.
Chights47
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 07:33 am
@Old Goat,
Generally when it's something that I would try to get them to notice, it's something that I've given them (such as a treat or a toy for fetch). I just pretend to throw something in that direction and then they see where it is because they follow the invisible object. It always works that they notice it, but only works about half the time for fetch.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 07:36 am
@Setanta,
Stash, my border collie will always stick close unless ordered to "away". She runs a few paces ahed and then tirns and looks toward me but not in my eye. She understands that eye contact is orders from the boss or a correction.
AShe doesnt need any corrections anymore except when she wants to roll in the mud during a sheep roundup. I have no idea where she got that from but I think she just likes the hosing down she gets afterwards . SO, Im a prisoner of my own technology.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 07:39 am
@farmerman,
It's instinctual to roll in mud, freshly mown grass or anything stinky. That serves to cover their scent in case they approach a prey animal upwind before becoming aware of the prey. That's why dogs positively love to roll in **** or dead things.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 08:31 am
@Setanta,
she is normally a fastidious doggie, except when we are herding the sheep.
One of her little proclivities is on a hot day if we are working the herd into other pastures.When she is done she will jump right into a big tub of water and get this AAAHHHHHHHHHH look on her face as she settles down in the water andall you see is her snout on the edge of the tub.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 09:03 am
@farmerman,
However, one must recognize a breed's strengths and weaknesses. I've learned a lot about Border Collies in the 3 years since I've had mine (and associated with Border Collie rescue.) Border Collies are so bred for the 'eye' and making that visual contact with their master. After so many generations of selective breeding the breed has produced one of the most responsive dogs - even to the extent of responding without any verbal commands at all. A well-trained Border collie can herd sheep with just whistles and hand commands alone.

Try that with a beagle and they'll laugh at you and question your sanity.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 09:05 am
@farmerman,
My BC dog (see avatar), Brady, loves to roll around on his back on my thick carpet. Or, if he's out in the field, he'll dive into a pond then eventually he'll roll around in the grass afterwards.

However, when we play fetch with his ball or a kong (hard rubber cone-shaped toy that bounces like mad), he'll catch it and after awhile, he'll take it to the water trough and wash it and his feet, too.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 09:37 am
@Ragman,
Ive been working Borer Collies and Shekties for almost 25 years . I dont use the whistke system becuase around here there are mockinbirds that can imitate the long tweets or the stacatto signals. I use a "hillbilly method" of hooting
like for a mule
Yoh is left
Hey is right
Woo woo is to me
DOWN! is down
heyaaah is change direction and come around
WAAAYOHH-is the hardest. (Its a non instinctual command to move the sheep away from me)

ACross a big valley if the collie and the catahoula cant hear me, the catahoula has better ears and can pick up on some of the commands by voice. Stash then takes over.

They are both good dogs and although Ernie, the catahoula is a bit rough (hes really a hog dog and will bite a sheep on the lip to get their attention) He hasnt done that baad thing in several years.

Bothe dogs are getting up there Stash is 10 and ERnie is ( so Im on the lookout for another two Border Collie pups. My method for choosing is one that eve had good luck with after 6 Border Collies and 3 catahouls (QAnd Golden that was brutalized and we rescued from a house that was a puppy dump, He was forever greatful for his new life. He died just two years ago and we buried him in the grove of trees with full herding honors (Although he wasnt much good at herding and just thought all this was great fun).

We have neighbors who have dogs that are (they say) uncontrollable, and I believe them. One neighbors kid was really viciously attacked by their BEAGLE (of all things). I think that the dog reflects the neuroses of the owners and their inability to take the leadership role.
Ernie and STash are just lying here next to me and they know instinctually that we are getting real close to shearing time and that will mean lots of hard work for about 2 days so they arent bugging me to go out to the pastures just yet. Next week will be their time to show us what theyve got.

I have a friend from ALtoona who has a small pack of really well bred Border Collies from relly well known national breeders. This guy is a surgeon and is into competition for top herd dog. He has gone all over and has never quite made it as the best, hes always just one step down from the leader. I suspect its because of his inability to really take charge. He gets mad easily and hes a bit of a drunk so he misses his cues and the dogs (no fools) always have this look of "Holy **** hes hammered again"
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 09:45 am
@farmerman,
Dogs are very perceptive, and have a wonderful sense of humor. I worked on a farm in New Mexico a long time ago, and there was a pack of dogs there, half border collie and half australian shepherd--all the pups of a bitch that was a part of the pack. We also had a besinji (sp?). The besinji, Twerp, was an enthusiastic chaser of coyotes, which the pack kept off the property, no exceptions. The pack would be after the coyote in full cry, with Twerp out in front of everyone. At a certain point, with no discernable signal, the herd dogs would all sit down, and just sit there and laugh. Very soon, Twerp would realize that she was out there all alone, which usually conincided with that realization on the part of the coyote. Then there would be real panic as she fought to stop, turn and take off full speed in the other direction. She never learned, either--they could pull that on her two, sometimes three times a week.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 09:55 am
@farmerman,
I know you're an expert on Border Collies...so my Border Collie wasn't meant as info inteded for you, but for open-ended conversation or info for others. And, of course, I'm also amazed at your esoteric interesting dog info - particularly about these gorgeous smarty-pants dogs. Seeing them when they are working a herd of sheep is poetry in motion.

BTW, the theory about the lineage for my own Border Collie is that he's partly bred with maybe a Greyhound. It's only a theory offered from one vet, but he is far more serene and able to sit quietly for hours on my sofa than any other Border Collie I've ever seen. His temperment is alleged to be more like grey-hound due to his comfort with being at rest at home.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 10:37 am
@Ragman,
Ive had two border collies that were mixed with other breeds, and the thing was, the border collies intelligence shone through but with some traits of the other breed. We had one that was apparently mixed with a springer and it wanted to bite the sheep instead of just "eyeballing them" ANother qwe had with some catahoula in it and he was a tireless runner . SAO much so that we always held him back on very hot days.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 11:03 am
@farmerman,
I'm so enthralled with Border Collie and the various mixes. I'm enthralled enough so that as long as I'm able to move around and be a good host to a dog, there'll be a Border Collie and/or BC-mix in my life. I'm particularly intrigued by BC-Lab mixes, BC-Ausssie Shepherd mixes, too. Of course, loving the Greyhound-BC mix as I mentioned, too.

Trust me though, I'm no purebred or breed-snob, either. Loving those hound dogs and mutts and I think they're great, but these guys are just amazing to be around daily.

Now that isn't to say that some Border Collies can't be a bit over-the-top, too.
One of my friend's 'gang of 4' BCs wraps her dew claws around your arm if you don't engage her and watch her perform her tricks. However that business we can blame on her master. He loves 'humoring' her.

He taught her to run on 2 treadmills in succession at full speed and max tilt...and he lines one up in front of another. She'll run through one and onto another and continue running and then circle around and do it again. You have to see this to believe it. She will bark or sit in front of the basement door waiting to be let down stairs where she can get running in.

You just better not say the phrase "wanna"? or "wanna run" without following through.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jun, 2011 06:36 pm
@Ragman,
Remember,. the stock dog association never recognized AKC because Border Collies are NOT bred for conformity to a norm but are bred to habit and brains. The AKC relented only a few years ago and the American STock DOg association accepted their apology and Borders and Shelties , and other stock dogs that were bred for brains are now seen in AKC shows. I hope the AKC's dickhead ideas of conformity to standard body doesnt prevail. Most purebred animals are being bred "to death" . My budd , who is a small animal vet told me that several dog breeds are changing for the worst. Everybody knows about how boxers only live to about 8 years, or German SHeps are so prone to hip dysplasia. What I diodnt know is that several breeds. The "gentle giants" like St Bernards or Hunting dogs like Vislas and Weimeraners are becoming vicious as they have been bred up for attentivemess and stamina, Apparently several traits can travel together on the genome. SO when , say a ST Bernard is bred for "head up" traits, the dog has become overly sensitive, protective , and is more and more responsible for unprovoked attacks on other dogs and people.
 

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