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2011 Hurricane Season ...

 
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2011 08:25 am
I'm a little concerned about I-97

http://icons-ecast.wunderground.com/data/images/at201197_model.gif
http://icons-ecast.wunderground.com/data/images/at201197_model_intensity.gif
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2011 09:11 am
@JPB,
Last night it was reported that a trip through the islands will leave it pretty disorganized...who knows.
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2011 06:31 pm
@panzade,
I-97 has been upgraded to TS Irene. She's expected to become the first hurricane of the 2011 season.

http://icons-ecast.wunderground.com/data/images/at201109.gif
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 06:50 am
@JPB,
I'll add in the 5-day and computer model maps for Irene. They should all update automatically.

http://icons-ecast.wunderground.com/data/images/at201109_5day.gif
http://icons-ecast.wunderground.com/data/images/at201109_model.gif
jcboy
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 07:20 am
@JPB,
Thanks, I’m watching this one closely, could be heading right towards me.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 09:47 am
Quote:
Dangerous Tropical Storm Irene headed for the Dominican Republic

By Dr. Jeff Masters
Published: 9:40 AM CDT on August 21, 2011
Tropical Storm Irene roared into life last night, transitioning from a tropical wave to a 50 mph tropical storm in just a few short hours. Irene is getting organized quickly, and has the potential to become a hurricane by Monday morning. All interests in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba, the Bahamas, and South Florida should prepare for the arrival of this dangerous storm. An Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft in the storm found the strongest winds near 18°N latitude to the north of Irene's center at 8am this morning. After passing through the center, the plane returned to the area of strongest winds two hours later, and found that flight level winds at 5,000 feet had increased by about 5 - 8 mph. However, the pressure in the latest center fix taken at 10am EDT remained the same as two hours previously, 1007 mb, and the plane noted that Irene's center was not circular, signs that the storm still has some work to do before serious intensification can begin. Visible satellite loops and radar out of Martinique show the storm has rapidly organized this morning, with well-developed spiral bands forming and a large area of intense thunderstorms to the north of the center. Irene has shrugged off the dry air that was bothering it yesterday, and wind shear has fallen to the low range, 5 - 10 knots, as analyzed by the University of Wisconsin CIMSS group. Torrential rains and strong gusty winds are affecting the northern Lesser Antilles this morning. A wind gust of 41 mph was recorded at St. Eustatius at 8am local time.

Track forecast for Irene
The computer models are in agreement that Irene will pass just south of Puerto Rico tonight, then hit the south coast of Hispaniola in the Dominican Republic or Haiti on Monday afternoon. Irene should then emerge into the channel between Haiti and Cuba on Tuesday afternoon, when the storm will have 12 or so hours over water before having to contend with Cuba. A trough of low pressure is expected to move across the Eastern U.S. on Wednesday and Thursday, turning Irene to the northwest and north by Thursday. The timing and strength of this trough varies considerably from model to model, and will be critical in determining where and when Irene will turn to the north. Irene's strength will also matter--a stronger Irene is more likely to turn northward earlier. The most likely path for Irene is a track just east of the Florida Peninsula and into Georgia, South Carolina, or North Carolina by next weekend, but a landfall near Miami then directly up the Florida Peninsula is also a reasonable solution

Intensity forecast for Irene
Irene is embedded in a large envelope of moisture now, and wind shear will remain low, 5 - 10 knots, for the next five days. With water temperatures very warm, 28 - 30°C, these conditions should allow for intensification except when land is interfering. Irene's current appearance on satellite loops gives me the impression of a storm that is not fooling around, and I expect Irene will be a hurricane before hitting Hispaniola on Monday. Passage over Hispaniola will not destroy Irene, since it is a fairly large storm. Once the storm finishes with Hispaniola, it will have to deal with Cuba, which will keep Irene from intensifying significantly. Once Irene pops off the coast of Cuba Wednesday or Thursday into the Florida Straits, Irene will likely be a tropical storm. If the storm then has at least a day over water before hitting land, it will likely become a hurricane again, and could become a major hurricane if it ends up missing South Florida and moving over the warm waters on either side of the Florida Peninsula. Dr Masters' blog
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 10:02 am
Long range radar from Puerto Rico.

http://radblast-mi.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/radar/WUNIDS_map?station=JUA&brand=wui&num=6&delay=15&type=N0Z&frame=0&scale=1.000&noclutter=0&t=1313942460&lat=18.46724892&lon=-66.10896301&label=San+Juan%2C+PR&showstorms=0&map.x=400&map.y=240&centerx=400&centery=240&transx=0&transy=0&showlabels=1&severe=0&rainsnow=0&lightning=0&smooth=0
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Aug, 2011 04:10 pm
Irene looked to be pretty slow moving but now appears to be picking up a bit of speed. She looks like she will spare Haiti and get into the Gulf in a couple days. She could develop into a Cat 3 with a path that could turn out badly for the lower eastern seaboard. I guess we will know more tomorrow or Wednesday.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 05:04 am
...fingers crossed...seems to be shifting slightly N. Eastward
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 06:33 am
@panzade,
The models are consolidating on a SC/NC landfall. There's still a chance that she could take a swing to the NE follow the coastline towards Long Island. The model error for more than three days out is 200-250 miles so it's still to soon to tell.
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 06:54 am
@JPB,
Here's a great graphic that demonstrates the changing dynamic of modeling. Looking out more than three days is really just educated guessing.

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t86/Rainman32_2007/AL09FA1.gif
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 05:41 pm
For a while I was a little worried but it looks like it won’t be coming anywhere near me.
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 06:44 pm
@jcboy,
Latest models show a RI/MA/ME event. Stay tuned. This one changes at every model run.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2011 04:49 pm
@JPB,
Update by update, Irene is leaning towards the east. Good news for us in central NC and VA.
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2011 04:52 pm
@realjohnboy,
Bad news for here John of Virginia.

Ocracoke Island, a tiny piece of land in North Carolina's Outer Banks, was evacuated starting early Wednesday in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane Irene.

Mandatory evacuations by ferry began at 5:30 a.m. on the 16-mile-long barrier island, home to about 800 permanent residents and healthy influx of tourists. The island is a test of evacuation procedures as the U.S. east coast prepares for its first major hurricane in seven years.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2011 04:58 pm
@Letty,
VA Beach and environs on Tuesday suspended all routine government services such as garbage collection and park maintenance. Workers were redeployed to storm readiness.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2011 05:22 pm
Collective sigh on Fla's Eastern coast.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 02:44 pm
Quote:
Irene an extremely dangerous storm surge threat to the mid-Atlantic and New England

By Dr. Jeff Masters
Published: 3:39 PM CDT on August 25, 2011
Back in 1938, long before satellites, radar, the hurricane hunters, and the modern weather forecasting system, the great New England hurricane of 1938 roared northwards into Long Island, New York at 60 mph, pushing a storm surge more than 15 feet high to the coast. Hundreds of Americans died in this greatest Northeast U.S. hurricane on record, the only Category 3 storm to hit the Northeast since the 1800s. Since 1938, there have been a number of significant hurricanes in the Northeast--the Great Atlantic hurricane of 1944, Hazel of 1954, Diane of 1955, Donna of 1960, Gloria of 1985, Bob of 1991, and Floyd of 1999--but none of these were as formidable as the great 1938 storm. Today, we have a hurricane over the Bahamas--Hurricane Irene--that threatens to be the Northeast's most dangerous storm since the 1938 hurricane. We've all been watching the computer models, which have been steadily moving their forecast tracks for Irene more to the east--first into Florida, then Georgia, then South Carolina, then North Carolina, then offshore of North Carolina--and it seemed that this storm would do what so many many storms have done in the past, brush the Outer Banks of North Carolina, then head out to sea. Irene will not do that. Irene will likely hit Eastern North Carolina, but the storm is going northwards after that, and may deliver an extremely destructive blow to the mid-Atlantic and New England states. I am most concerned about the storm surge danger to North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and the rest of the New England coast. Irene is capable of inundating portions of the coast under 10 - 15 feet of water, to the highest storm surge depths ever recorded. I strongly recommend that all residents of the mid-Atlantic and New England coast familiarize themselves with their storm surge risk. The best source of that information is the National Hurricane Center's Interactive Storm Surge Risk Map, which allows one to pick a particular Category hurricane and zoom in to see the height above ground level a worst-case storm surge may go. If you prefer static images, use wunderground's Storm Surge Inundation Maps. If these tools indicate you may be at risk, consult your local or state emergency management office to determine if you are in a hurricane evacuation zone. Mass evacuations of low-lying areas along the entire coast of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia are at least 50% likely to be ordered by Saturday. The threat to the coasts of New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine is less certain, but evacuations may be ordered in those states, as well. Irene is an extremely dangerous storm for an area that has no experience with hurricanes, and I strongly urge you to evacuate from the coast if an evacuation is ordered by local officials. My area of greatest concern is the coast from Ocean City, Maryland, to Atlantic City, New Jersey. It is possible that this stretch of coast will receive a direct hit from a slow-moving Category 2 hurricane hitting during the highest tide of the month, bringing a 10 - 15 foot storm surge. More
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 02:56 pm
@JPB,
More that I think needs to be posted.

Quote:
Irene's storm surge potentially extremely dangerous for the mid-Atlantic coast
Irene's large size, slow motion, arrival at high tide, and Category 3 strength at landfall in North Carolina will likely drive a storm surge of 8 - 10 feet into the heads of bays in Pamlico Sound, and 3 - 6 feet in Albemarle Sound. As the storm progresses northwards, potential storm surge heights grow due to the shape of the coast and depth of the ocean, though the storm will be weakening. If Irene is a Category 1 storm as it crosses into Virginia, it can send a storm surge of 4 - 8 feet into Chesapeake Bay and Norfolk. I give a 50% chance that the surge from Irene in those locations will exceed the record surges observed in 2003 during Hurricane Isabel. The region I am most concerned about, though, is the stretch of coast running from southern Maryland to Central New Jersey, including Delaware and the cities of Ocean City and Atlantic City. A Category 1 hurricane can bring a storm surge of 5 - 9 feet here. Irene's large size, slow movement, and arrival at the highest tide of the month could easily bring a surge one Category higher than the storm's winds might suggest, resulting in a Category 2 type inundation along the coast, near 10 - 15 feet. This portion of the coast has no hurricane experience, and loss of life could be heavy if evacuation orders are not heeded. I give a 30% chance that the storm surge from Irene will bring water depths in excess of 10 feet to the coasts of Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 04:30 pm
@JPB,
Here in central Virginia we had a couple fierce storms sweep through from the west today with more predicted for tomorrow. Perhaps they may push Irene further east. But perhaps not.
The messages from the fed govt and state officials is pretty scary. As your articles noted, storm surges from NC to NE could be big. Or it could end up being nothing of significance.
That would be good in the short term but...
On NPR this afternoon a resident of NC's Outer Banks named Beaver defended his decision to hunker down as "a family tradition."
 

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