6
   

Uncovered - the original version

 
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2013 06:56 pm
@panzade,
I was listening to this in the car in the morning and suddenly remembered you telling me about the ocarina solo - so yes, you definitely had already posted this and I'd forgotten.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2013 07:23 pm
Anybody remember this Wild Thing?
0 Replies
 
arieana
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Feb, 2013 08:13 am
@hingehead,
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSehtaY6k1U


panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Feb, 2013 11:14 am
@arieana,
good one, though Tico posted it here
http://able2know.org/topic/171829-1#post-4601610
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Feb, 2013 03:29 pm
I was going through my collection and found this:



I like Cream's version but Ross's is like the earliest glimmer of Rock & Roll...terrific tune

hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Mar, 2013 08:54 pm
@panzade,
Panz wrote:
I like Cream's version but Ross's is like the earliest glimmer of Rock & Roll...terrific tune


Was it really recorded in 1961? In my mind's timeline of Rock that's well after the birth of Rock n Roll.

Thanks for sharing, I think I prefer Ross's but that's probably the first time I've noticed Cream's version.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 05:11 am
Didn't know that randy Newman wrote mama told me not to come but apparently he wasn't the first to record it



Here's newmans



And this is the one most people know

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 07:45 am
@hingehead,
That's one that took me by surprise.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 02:32 pm
@hingehead,
Quote:
In my mind's timeline of Rock that's well after the birth of Rock n Roll.


A little research shows my interpretation was rubbish. You always keep me straight, Hinge.
Here's a little history on Ross, a most interesting musician, from a most interesting blog
http://thehoundblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/doctor-ross.html

panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 02:42 pm
A couple more Newman covers. if you didn't know:

Bonnie Raitt-Guilty
Quote:
In an interview given in 1982, Raitt would reveal that "Takin' My Time is one of my favorite records to listen to, although I started out with Lowell George producing it, and he and I got too close to be able to have any objectivity about it. That's the problem when you're a woman and you get involved with the people you work with - and I just don't just mean romantically. It becomes too emotional. It's hard to have a strong woman telling the man her ideas when, in fact, the man wants to take over the situation. So that album had a lot of heartache in it. At the time it was a difficult one to make, but now I like it."

Also covered by Joe Cocker on "Live"

0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 02:56 pm
Covered by Joe Cocker


0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 06:01 pm
@panzade,
You stumbled on a particular trivia interest of mine - I actually maintain a list of what various rock writers cite to be the birth of rock 'n roll.

The earliest so far is Robert Palmer's 'Dancing in the street' that nominates Clarence 'Pinetop' Smith's 'Pinetop's Boogie Woogie' released in 1929.



At no.2 (so far) is Ed Ward in 'Rock of ages' writing
"Eerily prophetic of rock and roll. Its crisp 4/4 time, swirling piano, and simple but effective mandolin soloing, relying on many of the same techniques Chuck Berry would use on electric guitar, put it way outside the blues mainstream (and outside Estes's usual work) and into another dimension entirely. All it lacks is bass and drums to put it squarely in contention for the title of first rock and roll record ever."
from 1930


The most commonly nominated tune is 'Rocket 88' by Ike Turner's Kings of Rhythm (Jackie Brenston on vocals) 1951

Excuse this diversion from topic, like I said it's a particular interest of mine

This book is a bit of a hoot - and Tosches has some very sane, but inconclusive ideas about where RnR really started.
Unsung Heroes Of Rock 'n' Roll: The Birth Of Rock In The Wild Years Before Elvis
by Nick Tosches
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40663.Unsung_Heroes_Of_Rock_n_Roll
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 07:18 pm
@hingehead,
Interesting to me too. Your two examples are a bit too esoteric for my liking.

I'll take the tune that first was described in print as "Rock & Roll.
Caldonia by Erskine Hawkins as described in Billboard magazine in 1945.
But I prefer Louis Jordan's version. To me it's the first Rock & Roll tune.
I think Chuck Berry took the horn riff in the break and made it R&R.

hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 08:02 pm
@panzade,
I like that vid panz - it kind of highlights to me why the whole 'first rock n roll song' thing is answerless Louis Jordan's Tympani 5 in 1938 were the first of the 'hot' R&B bands and there's a clear line from them to rock n roll. And lots of rock historians point to white teens with small radios picking up black stations at night as building the appetite for what would become RnR but if it's R&B is it RnR?

It's kind of like a creationist vs evolutionist debate. Simple fact is that the antecedents of RnR were still active after RnR emerged from the swamp and RnR is by definition a magpie of other genres. The first RnR track isn't as important as the most popular one, ergo the first time RnR was played isn't as important as the point at which the audience for it was significant.

Excuse my waffling.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 08:06 pm
@hingehead,
I dig your waffling, as usual.
Good post
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 08:10 pm
@panzade,
Arieana is a copy cat (bot? whatever)
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 08:16 pm
Very Early Rock & Roll (but reflective of the Blues). Big Joe Turner's version and the first, preceding Bill Haley & His Comets version by 3-4 weeks on the Top 40 charts. Bill Haley's version is clearly more reflective of what we now know as Rock & Roll styling:


Take note that the announcer referred to this as the blues. Big Joe in that era was considered a Blues 'shouter'.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 08:17 pm
@hingehead,
Interesting - I'm still following as a person with low access to yt.

The good news is I found the info re the guy that last fixed my computer - it was in my telephone file, what?, I put it there after giving someone else his number...
instead of into my Mac file.

so that just maybe he can help me with what the f is my username, changed over time by computer geek help, so that I can access the latest possible for me Adobe Flash, except that my computer is too old to accept this and that.


But, reading along.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 09:12 pm
@Ragman,
Hi Ragman
from memory the original lyrics are far more risque than Haley's version, having some trouble finding them.

The wikipedia entry
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shake,_Rattle_and_Roll
Has an interesting side note touching on the conversation Panz and I were just having

wikipedia, oracle who knows all wrote:

Comparison of the Joe Turner and Bill Haley versions

Both recordings are considered classics. Haley's version is peppier and brighter. It fits the definition of rock and roll as a merger of country music and rhythm and blues. Haley had started his career in country music while Turner was a blues shouter.

Comparing the two versions illustrates the differences between blues and rock 'n' roll. A simple, stark instrumental backing is heard on the Turner version. Where the Turner version uses a walking bass line, the Comets version, produced by Milt Gabler of Decca Records, features an energetic slap bass. A subdued horn arrangement in the Turner recording can be contrasted with a honking sax riff that answers each line of verse in Haley's version, and the entire band shouts "Go!" as part of the vocal backing.[8]

Although musical revisionists and American media tried to paint Turner as a victim of the music industry due to Haley's covering of the song, in fact Haley's success helped Turner immensely although Turner was a well-established performer long before "Shake Rattle and Roll". Listeners who hear Haley's version sought out Turner's. The two men became close friends, and performed on tour together in Australia in 1957. In 1966, at a time when Turner's career was at a low ebb, Haley arranged for his Comets to back the elder musician for a series of recordings in Mexico, although apparently Haley and Turner did not record a duet version of "Shake Rattle and Roll".[9]

Haley acknowledged Turner's version in later years by incorporating more of the original lyrics into his live performances, including adding the verse with the lines "I've been over the hill and I've been way down underneath" which was omitted from Haley's original recording, when he recorded the song for Stuart Colman's BBC Radio program in October 1979. When he performed the song at the Bitter End club in New York City in 1969 for his Buddah Records album release Bill Haley's Scrapbook, Haley changed Turner's "I believe to my soul you're the devil in nylon hose" to "I believe you've been doin' me wrong and now I know". Both Turner's and Haley's versions contain the double entendre "I'm like a one-eyed cat peepin' in a seafood store." In Turner's version, the girl is ordered to "get out of that bed"; Haley changes it "get out in that kitchen", nonetheless, in his version she is directed to "roll my breakfast cause I'm a hungry man". In other words, she has spent the night with the singer in both versions. When Joe Turner performed the song in the 1955 film Rock 'n' Roll Revue, he chose to sing the Bill Haley version of the opening verse.

Both versions sold over one million copies, marking "Shake Rattle and Roll" the first giant rock'n'roll hit.[10]
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Mar, 2013 11:45 am
Joe South wrote this song for Billy Joe Royal (Down In The Boondocks) and it was covered by Deep Purple in the now famous version.

Royal's version peaked at 52 in Nov. 1967.


Joe South was an amazing talent.

0 Replies
 
 

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