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9/11 Judge sets time limit on Trial

 
 
Linkat
 
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 11:19 am
Ever hear of setting a time limit on a trial? Personally it doesn't seem right - I'd think a judge would be a proponent of trying to get to the truth whether it takes more time or not. I understand that some trials may seem too long, but what if it really takes that long to provide all the evidence?

The family of Mark Bavis, a passenger on the second plane to hit the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, is determined to prove what it believes was negligence, has resisted attempts to settle. Theirs is the last wrongful-death action still pending of more than 90 filed after the attacks. Thousands of other families avoided court and received payments through a victims’ compensation fund.

But now, after this seemingly endless run-up, with a trial scheduled for later this year, the judge, Alvin K. Hellerstein of Federal District Court in Manhattan, has set a time limit. In a highly unusual move, Judge Hellerstein will restrict each side to the same number of hours — in one estimate, 50 to 60 — to present its case, and time the trial like a speed chess match.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/28/nyregion/at-911-trial-lawyers-will-watch-the-clock.html
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,358 • Replies: 9
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 01:33 pm
@Linkat,
Without reading the link, it might be a good idea. Fifty hours seems adequate to present relavant evidence and testimony. A hundred hours for each side seems adquate to enhance the compensation of attorneys.
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 01:36 pm
so, close to ten years wasn't enough time
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 01:38 pm
@Linkat,
Some people in the world just aren't reasonable; I expect the judge has his reasons for doing this.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 01:47 pm
@Linkat,
Quote:
In a highly unusual move,


about a highly unusual event, which makes the judge's move even more highly unusual, in the sense of proper, but given how things have proceeded to date, perfectly understandable.
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Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 02:15 pm
@DrewDad,
I assume so - but it is not typical to put a time limit - a judge during a trial can do certain things to move a trial along if s/he feels it is necessary, but I've never heard of having a time limit.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 03:17 pm
@Linkat,
So, instead of hundreds of witness testifying to what a great guy and good father the victim was, they cut it down to four or five. I don't see the loss.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 03:37 pm
@roger,
Quote:
The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund was created by an Act of Congress, the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act (49 USC 40101),[1] shortly after 9/11 to compensate the victims of the attack (or their families) in exchange for their agreement not to sue the airline corporations involved. Kenneth Feinberg was appointed by Attorney General John Ashcroft to be Special Master of the fund. He worked for 33 months pro bono. He developed the regulations governing the administration of the fund and administered all aspects of the program.


Already, it smells as fishy as two day old trout left in the Sun. Why would Congress take your money to provide legal protection for some corporations? Do you think that they will pass a law to provide a legal slush fund for me in case I want to mix up a batch of home made medicine?

Do you think that the fund was actually meant to provide protection for the airlines or was it to provide protection for John Ashcroft and his merry group of co-criminals?
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joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2011 03:53 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:
I assume so - but it is not typical to put a time limit - a judge during a trial can do certain things to move a trial along if s/he feels it is necessary, but I've never heard of having a time limit.

I've never heard of it being done either.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2011 05:28 pm
@Linkat,
I suppose it may depend on the type of trial, and the jurisdiction. Family law trials in Arizona are customarily scheduled for a specific length of time, typically around 3 hours each. Obviously, cases with more complex issues are scheduled for longer time.
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