11
   

installing vinyl tiles over an older kitchen floor

 
 
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 09:31 pm
I am currently prepping my kitchen floor for new vinyl tiles. I have discovered that there is a hideous layer of linoleum over two different layers of old tile.

The first two layers are very uneven and are obviously not suitable as a level surface for the new tiles. The 3rd layer seems to be somewhat level but certainly isn't perfect and even has a bit of a gap in it.

Beneath all of this there seems to be a layer of plywood which may or may not be a bit rotten as the house is quite old.

Should I tear up the 3rd layer (old tile) and install the new tiles over the plywood?

or should I install the new tile over the old ones, possibly using some sort of compound to create a level surface?

does it make sense to install a new layer of plywood over either of these layers?

I'm renting, so I don't want to get this project to get out of hand.

Thanks in advance!
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 11 • Views: 28,287 • Replies: 19
Topic Closed
No top replies

 
fishin
 
  1  
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 09:38 pm
You mention vinyl tiles so I'm going to assume you mean the self stick type here.

I've never had any luck with getting self-stick tiles to stay down when applied right over plywood. The plywood sems to absord the adhesive and it dries out and the tiles pop up.

Maybe there is a way to seal the plywood before installing self stick tiles but if the existing tiles are secure I'd use a leveling compound to fill any gaps and smooth things out and then apply the new tiles right over the top of them.
eoe
 
  1  
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 09:42 pm
About four years ago, my husband laid vinyl tiles over the old linoleum floor in our kitchen and it looks great. Still.
0 Replies
 
slmndr13
 
  1  
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 09:57 pm
Thank you both!

The tiles are indeed self-stick. I'm going to get rid of the two top layers, and (unless the 3rd layer is a complete disaster) install the new tiles after applying leveling compound.
0 Replies
 
colorbook
 
  1  
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 10:01 pm
Because there are three layers, you need a sub floor. Use inexpensive luan and install it right over any existing tiles. Make sure any loosened tiles are glued down. Fill in any seams on the luan with a seaming compound. Your floor is now prepped and ready for the tiles. If using self sticking tiles, it doesn't hurt to add a little extra glue like Mighty White to keep them secure. If you use quality tile, this floor will last many years. To have a professional do this for you, the labor alone would cost about $1200.00.

To save money, you can buy a leveling compound before you put the tiles down. However, if any tiles become loose later on, you will wish you had made a sub floor in the first place.
0 Replies
 
slmndr13
 
  1  
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 10:21 pm
colorbook:

If I have good luck in getting rid of the top 2 layers, and the third is in decent shape (this seems to be the case so far), would you still recommend a new sub floor?
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  1  
Sun 28 Dec, 2003 10:29 pm
Bump that. You're renting.
0 Replies
 
colorbook
 
  1  
Mon 29 Dec, 2003 04:00 am
Slmndr, that is up to you. Go to your nearest home improvement store to get prices and ask questions. If you choose to cover one layer of existing tile, make sure none of the tiles are loose and that the floor is very clean of any debris. Good luck with your project. :wink:
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Mon 29 Dec, 2003 03:59 pm
Does the floor squeak?
0 Replies
 
slmndr13
 
  1  
Mon 29 Dec, 2003 10:02 pm
It squeaks a bit in one section.


And it looks like there will a patch about 18 inches by 24 inches in which whatever was under the second layer* is going to peel up leaving maybe a sixteenth or 8th of an inch deep void. This area matches up with the squeaking.

I'm not sure what I'm going to do about filling this void after I remove the layers above it.

* it seems like they placed some sort of pressed or strip wood here instead of the tiles that cover the rest of the floor on the 3rd layer down.
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  1  
Mon 29 Dec, 2003 10:18 pm
oh-oh
0 Replies
 
slmndr13
 
  1  
Mon 29 Dec, 2003 11:12 pm
actually, there are a few other squeaks as well.
0 Replies
 
kjvtrue
 
  1  
Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:34 am
Mee too, slmndr13
I tried getting as much tile and linoleum off, as I could, now there's bits and peices I can't get off, and the whole entire Kitchen Floor is lumpy. How can I fix this problem?
0 Replies
 
fishin
 
  1  
Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:54 am
Go to a hardware store and get yourself a floor scraper. It should look something like this:

http://www.tile-stonetools.com/350-360_more.jpg

That will peel off a lot of those llittle bumps. You may have to use a heavy putty knife as a chisel with a hammer on some of the remaining bits to get them off. After that you'll need to look at the sub-floor itself. If the wood is rotted you'd probably want to replace those sections. If it's good wood you can use "leveling compound" to level out the little spots. Something like this http://www.super-tek.com/superflexcote.htm should work.
0 Replies
 
kjvtrue
 
  1  
Thu 22 Jan, 2004 05:35 pm
I used those tools allready. I forgot to mention the last tile was tared down, and that's why I can't get the rest.
0 Replies
 
fishin
 
  1  
Thu 22 Jan, 2004 06:04 pm
Someone probably tried to glue down a piece that had peeled up. They may have used an oil based adhesive/mastic. Blech!

If the solvents and elbow grease won't take it up then you may be stuck ruining some sanding belts. Do you have a belt sander?
0 Replies
 
bob9753
 
  1  
Tue 10 Apr, 2012 11:08 am
8 years old but still helpful
0 Replies
 
millerdavid786
 
  1  
Tue 5 Mar, 2013 12:01 am
@slmndr13,
Hi, it depends on your budget if you have good budget you should change old tiles......
0 Replies
 
Aiden Brown
 
  0  
Fri 17 May, 2013 03:58 am
It depends on the condition of floor that was previously set up. If the layers present can be successfully removed then it is better to make a proper base for flooring.
0 Replies
 
yides
 
  1  
Tue 29 Dec, 2015 04:39 pm
@fishin,
Hi. Good luck with your renovations.
Your new tiles should be installed on top of levelled new ply-wood, which you may put on top of whatever there is presently.
The best would be to pick up all the layers, and put new plywood.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Poo-tee-weet? - Question by boomerang
Let's just rename them "Rapeublicans" - Discussion by DrewDad
Which wood laminate flooring? - Question by Buffalo
Metal Roofs pros & con s - Question by Swimpy
Buying a new entry door - Question by sozobe
Need water help - Question by richierich
Lifesource Water versus a 'salt' system - Discussion by USBound
Rainsoft - Discussion by richb1
 
  1. Forums
  2. » installing vinyl tiles over an older kitchen floor
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/27/2021 at 02:12:29