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Tunesia, Egyt and now Yemen: a domino effect in the Middle East?

 
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 02:59 pm
Listening to President Mubarak's speech. He's not starting off very well, imo.
talk72000
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:08 pm
People seem to forget that corruption takes money out of the system thus leaving less for jobs. Corruption on a massive scale certainly leads to higher unemployment and maybe even a recession as is the case with the US Wall Street corruption which led to the financial crisis and higher unemployment.
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:09 pm
That sounded extremely defensive and clueless.
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Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:10 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

It will not be a matter of standing up to the Muslim Brotherhood

http://pewglobal.org/2010/12/02/muslims-around-the-world-divided-on-hamas-and-hezbollah/


From that poll:

Quote:
Many Muslims see a struggle between those who want to modernize their country and Islamic fundamentalists. Only in Jordan and Egypt do majorities say there is no such struggle in their countries (72% and 61%, respectively).

At least three-quarters of Muslims in Egypt and Pakistan say they would favor making each of the following the law in their countries: stoning people who commit adultery, whippings and cutting off of hands for crimes like theft and robbery and the death penalty for those who leave the Muslim religion. Majorities of Muslims in Jordan and Nigeria also favor these harsh punishments.

In Egypt, 82 percent want stoning for those who commit adultery; 77 percent would like to see whippings and hands cut off for robbery; and 84 percent favor the death penalty for any Muslim who changes his religion.

Asked if they supported “modernizers” or “Islamists” only 27 percent said modernizers while 59 percent said Islamists
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:13 pm
@JPB,
Quote:
That sounded extremely defensive and clueless..
Ya...I dont see that working..

CNN online ran live streaming of the propaganda run in Egypt after the speech...it would have had Goebbels beaming...However I have serious doubts that the audience was buying..
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:15 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

revelette wrote:

boy, finn, I don't think I have read such a gloom and doom and somewhat offensive in language post from you before. What gives?

When I look at the images of all the people in Egypt exercising rights we take for granted, I just see it as a positive thing regardless if they have a plan for what is next or not. Apparently, all those people know what they had and they don't want it anymore. When we first started our country I doubt the "founding fathers" had all the answers either.


Offensive language?

Do you mean the use of "wogs?" That was intended as parody, and not meant to offend. . . .



I was wondering about that, too.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:26 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Back to this later, but I wanted to highlight one section...

Quote:
Only in Jordan and Egypt do majorities of Muslims say there is no struggle between modernizers and Islamic fundamentalists in their countries. About seven-in-ten (72%) Jordanian Muslims and 61% of Egyptian Muslims offer this opinion; just 20% and 31%, respectively, see a struggle in their countries. In both of these countries, however, Muslims are now more likely than they were in 2009 to say there is a struggle; a year ago, 14% of Muslims in Jordan and 22% in Egypt saw a struggle in their countries.

Among Muslims who see a struggle between modernizers and Islamic fundamentalists, majorities in Lebanon (84%), Turkey (74%), Pakistan (61%) and Indonesia (54%) side with those who want to modernize their countries; a plurality of Jordanian Muslims who say there is a struggle in their country also side with the modernizers (48%). In Egypt and Nigeria, however, most Muslims who see a struggle in their countries say they identify with Islamic fundamentalists (59% and 58%, respectively).
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:31 pm
@JPB,
Something doesn't seem right about that poll.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:35 pm
@JPB,
OK but you'll have to explain why you want to highlight it.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:35 pm
@realjohnboy,
Like what?

The source is reputable: Pew
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:38 pm
@realjohnboy,
Not sure what you're seeing, rjb, but it says that 31% of the Egyptians surveyed believe there is a struggle between the modernizers and the fundamentalists and 58% of that 31% (or 18% overall) support the fundamentalist position in that struggle.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:39 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Pew is reputable. I'll try to look at it more closely later, as I gather, will be JPB.
I think the poll may have been of Muslims vs the general population.
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:40 pm
@JPB,
It does clearly show that there is an increase in the number of people who think there is such a struggle.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:50 pm
@realjohnboy,
realjohnboy wrote:
I think the poll may have been of Muslims vs the general population.


I think so, too. According to the CIA World Fact Book, 90% of the population in Egypt is Muslim. 9% Coptic, 1% Christian.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:53 pm
@realjohnboy,
True -- only two of the tables/graphs in the survey are based on the full sample or non-Muslim subgroups.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:54 pm
@JPB,
corrected post above

JPB wrote:

Not sure what you're seeing, rjb, but it says that 31% of the Egyptian Muslims surveyed believe there is a struggle between the modernizers and the fundamentalists and 58% of that 31% (or 18% overall) support the fundamentalist position in that struggle.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:56 pm
From the Guardian:

9.47pm GMT: We have fresh audio from the Guardian's Jack Shenker, who listened to Mubarak's speech among the crowd in Tahrir Square:

"People were bursting with hostility, many people held up their shoes in the air, which is, as you probably know, is one of the gravest insults you can show people in Arab culture, and as he announced that he would not be running in the September elections many of those shoes were hurled at the screen."

9.40pm GMT: Amr Moussa, secretary general of the Arab League and a likely presidential candidate, is speaking to CNN, saying that there should now be a debate over whether Mubarak's offers in tonight's speech are enough to satisfy the protesters' demands. But it sounds like he thinks they are.

"I believe that this is something new that has been offered and it should be considered carefully," Moussa says, mentioning the limits on presidential terms and the new election laws raised by Mubarak.

Asked if he will run for the presidency in September's elections, Moussa replies: "Yes I will think about it seriously in the next few weeks."
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 03:57 pm
From the Telegraph

"He humiliated us for 30 years, now we want to humiliate him" - Amar al Zoghy, a protester in Tahrir Square, Cairo.

21:30 In Cairo's central Tahrir Square, protesters said Mr Mubarak's concession was not enough and they want him to leave now. They shouted that he should not be allowed the graceful exit he seeks.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 04:14 pm
10:07pm: The major opposition parties, including the Muslim Brotherhood, say they have rejected the offers made by Mubarak tonight, according to Ivan Watson of CNN.

And to confirm earlier suggestions, MSNBC cable news confirms that Mubarak's speech tonight was taped, not live. Where Mubarak was at the time is anyone's guess, although most educated guesses put him in Sharm el-Sheikh.

10.04pm GMT: It sounds as if plans are being made for another massive protest, this time at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, possibly taking place on Friday.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 04:16 pm
In regard to Syria:

Quote:
Syria is not Egypt or Tunisia," said Moaaz, a business student in Damascus who said he would attend the pro-Assad rally. He spoke on condition that his last name not be used. "We have work and Syria is standing up for itself."

A 45-year-old teacher from a village southwest of Damascus, fears a change in Syria's political system would adversely affect the country's largest minority, the Christians.

"The president is important for Christians. If something ever happened to cause him to go, the Muslims would get in and we [Christians] would be in big trouble," he said. "The president has done a lot for us."


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-jordan-cabinet-20110202,0,1165950.story
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