53
   

Tunesia, Egyt and now Yemen: a domino effect in the Middle East?

 
 
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 10:58 am
@JTT,
YOU!
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 11:02 am
@RABEL222,
Am I one to deny facts, Rabel? Am I the one who makes excuses for war criminals? Am I one who denies, by flight or fancy, that these war crimes of the US exist.

Are you not now engaging in delusion?
spendius
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 11:07 am
@JPB,
Muhammad min Libya makes sense JP.

I think they are talking no-fly zones as a method of having something to say which makes it sound like they are doing something when they are not. How would it be enforced?

JTT
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 11:12 am
@spendius,
The UK, the US and the Suckups could get together and put an embargo on Libya. That worked really well in Iraq. This time they could shoot for a million or maybe a couple million dead Libyan kids.
spendius
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 12:10 pm
@JTT,
Gold hitting new peaks.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 04:41 pm
It seems to be turning into a civil war. It is difficult for such a small population to turf out a dictator. It would be even worse if there is foreign intervention. Police are wary of interveneing in domestic violence cases for if a police officer holds one member of the family the whole family regardless of their differences will attack the police member. Foreign intervention will bring all the Libyans and Arabs together against the foreigners.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 04:45 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Remind you of anyone y'all know?
Yes, it reminds me of you . Hows the Vietnam War protest movement going ?
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 04:49 pm
@JTT,
Quote:
Am I the one who makes excuses for war criminals?
ALWAYS !! Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot, bin Laden, Qaddafi, et al are all excellent examples of the chance to point out war crimes by the side that keeps you alive . You are an obsessive hypocrite . Do you work for North Korea or do you live in the Gaza strip ?
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 10:03 pm
@Ionus,
Now I know why you call yourself Ianus. You're the most anal retentive guy I've ever come across. That must be the one track mind they gave you when you joined the military.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 10:09 pm
@spendius,
spendi, Owning one oz of gold at +$1,400 only proves what Barnham said about suckers.
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 10:48 pm
@cicerone imposter,

Dident he say one born every minute. It should be updated to one every second.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Mar, 2011 10:53 pm
@RABEL222,
Yeah, there's a bunch of 'em out there! LOL
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 02:05 am
@JTT,
Quote:
You're the most anal retentive guy I've ever come across.
You have copied this without knowing what it means...now run away and google it and then we will discuss how it applies to you .

How are those poor terrorists doing ? Any comment yet on your Palestinian friends who bashed the heads of children open on rocks because the Israeli military were closing in ? They would rather murder children then fight soldiers . Sounds like that would be right up your alley.....
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 03:53 am
@cicerone imposter,
One ounce!! Sheesh!! Houses can be a liability. Paper is paper.
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:49 am
Quote:
Libyan warplanes have bombed the oil refinery and port town of Marsa El Brega on Wednesday.

"It’s now an air attack. We just watched an air force jet from Libyan air force fly over Brega and drop at least one bomb and huge plumes of smoke are now coming out over Brega," Al Jazeera's Tony Birtley said as a battle between pro-Gadhafi forces and opponents continued.

The warplane from Gadhafi's air force struck a beach near where the two sides were fighting at a university campus. The witness says the blast raised a plume of sand from a dune but caused no casualties, apparently an attempt to scare off the anti-Gadhafi fighters besieging regime forces in the campus.

Forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi are also reported to have regained control of two strategic towns in the country's northwest.

The bombing of Brega and reports about the fall of Gharyan and Sabratha came as Gaddafi appeared on state television once again.

"They tried to take Brega this morning, but they failed," Mustafa Gheriani, a spokesman for the February 17th Coalition, an anti-government group, told the Reuters news agency.

"It is back in the hands of the revolutionaries. He is trying to create all kinds of psychological warfare to keep these cities on edge."


Al Jazeera's Jacky Rowland, reporting from Bengazi, Libya's second largest city now controlled by rebels, described the situation in the Brega region as fluid.

" I think it's fair to say that here is a fair amount of fighting going on in that area," she said.

Earlier the Associated Press news agency quoted Ahmed Jerksi, manager of the oil installation in Brega, as saying that pro-Gaddafi forces took control of the facility at dawn without using force.

There were conflicting claims about the casualties from these battles.

Located between Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte -- still under government control -- and the opposition-held eastern port of Benghazi, Brega also sits near ethnic fault lines between tribes loyal to Gaddafi and eastern groups opposed to him.

Government forces were also reported to be battling to regain control of rebel-held towns close to Tripoli, trying to create a buffer zone around what is still Gaddafi's seat of power.

Our correspondent said an air raid carried out by forces loyal to Gaddafi reportedly targeted a weapons store about 6km outside the eastern town of Ajdabiya.

Witnesses told the Associated Press news agency that they saw two warplanes bomb the town's eastern outskirts at 10am local time.

They also said pro-Gaddafi forces were advancing on the town. "I see two jets bombing now,'' one witness said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Another witness said rebel forces were rushing to the western side of Ajdabiya to meet the advancing pro-Gaddafi force.

Repeated air raids

Libyan forces have launched repeated air raids during the two-week revolt but all of them have been reported to target facilities that store weapons in areas controlled by the rebels.

Wednesday's developments come as the US sent warships to the region as part of a Western effort to pile more pressure on Gaddafi to stop his violent crackdown and step aside.

The destroyer USS Barry moved through the Suez Canal on Monday and into the Mediterranean Sea.

Two amphibious assault ships, the USS Kearsarge, which can carry 2,000 marines, and the USS Ponce passed through the canal on Wednesday.

The White House said the ships were being redeployed in preparation for possible humanitarian efforts but stressed it "was not taking any options off the table".

"We are looking at a lot of options and contingencies. No decisions have been made on any other actions," Robert Gates, the US defence secretary, said.

The US says Libya could sink into civil war unless Gaddafi quits amid fears that the uprising - the bloodiest
against long-serving rulers in north Africa and the Middle East - could cause a humanitarian crisis.

Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, has cautioned that "Libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war".

But Gaddafi remains defiant and his son, Saif al-Islam, has warned the West against launching military action, insisting that his father would neither step down nor go into exile.


source
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:55 am
Gaddafi's forces unleashed on rebels

Quote:
Eyewitness reports varied but several who spoke to the Herald estimated that up to 400 troops attacked the city's oil and gas plants early in the morning.

A Sirte Oil company engineer, Mufta Khafaji, said at least eight oil workers were killed.

The attack signalled the first major attempt by Colonel Gaddafi to regain control of the country's east.

Two jets dropped bombs near Ajdabiya but they appeared deliberately off target. After the bombs were released the jets turned around and flew west.

Ahmed Jerksi, the manager of Sirte Oil, which runs the facility in Brega, told Associated Press pro-Gaddafi forces took control of the plant, about 70 kilometres south-west of Ajdabiya.

But the rebels had then pushed the pro-Gaddafi forces away and were back in control, according to several of their leaders in Ajdabiya.

''Brega is now under the full control of the revolution,'' a police general in Ajdabiya said on condition of anonymity.

''People have gone from Ajdabiya to help,'' he said.

Mehdi Suleiman Hussein, a fighter from Ajdabiya, told AFP that ''Gaddafi's forces arrived in Brega and fought, but now they are pulling back''. He said that some ''mercenaries'' were still battling the rebels.

Rebel leaders frustrated at Colonel Gaddafi's diminished but unyielding grip on power have asked the United Nations for air strikes as the Arab League considered a resolution opposing foreign military intervention.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  3  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 12:50 pm
Tough call. My armchair QB stance right now, based on what I've read and heard from Libyans at home and abroad is no. Not yet, at least. I was listening to Ari Fleisher on Fox News the other day who said that walking away from our position of authority in the world is walking away from morality. I almost fell off my treadmill.

Quote:
Two US warships have passed through the Suez canal and closer to Libya (see 2.58pm). But the US defence secretary, Robert Gates, told a congressional committee that establishing a no-fly zone would have to begin with an attack on Libyan territory, in order to destroy Muammar Gaddafi's air defence weapons. He noted that the overall military effort would require more planes than are available from a single US aircraft carrier, but said if Barack Obama wanted a no-fly zone established, the Pentagon could do it. However, the idea has been rejected by Russia, which holds a veto-wielding seat on the UN security council. Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, said she was worried Libya would descend into chaos and become "a giant Somalia" ie a haven for al-Qaida
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 01:26 pm
@JPB,
I hope Russia continues on its stance of "no."
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 01:43 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I'm sure everybody is very happy about that ci. If the argument is evenly balanced in the Kremlin perhaps your expression of hope will swing it.

Incidentally, why do you hope that? Wouldn't it be better to use your hope resources to hope that the human race would disppear?
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 02:04 pm
@spendius,
spendius wrote:
I think they are talking no-fly zones as a method of having something to say which makes it sound like they are doing something when they are not. How would it be enforced?

It would be very difficult. Tripoli is just under 500NM from the nearest NATO airbase near Catania Sicily, and there aren't enough airborne tankers in NATO to support continuous tactical air operations at that range. Moreover, I doubt that in view of its colonial history, Italy would wish to intervene. The U.S. which once kept two carrier battle groups in the Mediterannean, has none there now. The French have a small nuclear carrier, but it wouldn't be enough to do the job.

I think your assessment is correct - this is talk for the sake of talk, by folks who have no intention of carrying it out.

It is hard to predict what will unfold in situations such as the one in Libya and harder still to know or guess who or what will emerge as the new order there. The attractions of intervention by folks who so vociferously oppose our intervention in Iraq is a mystery to me.
0 Replies
 
 

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