31
   

The worlds first riddle!

 
 
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Mar, 2018 01:52 pm
Oh Eke you do make I laugh – I didn’t say do you have creamy puppies. I said ‘keepy uppies’… how are your juggling skills?

I often say . . . that when you can measure what you are speaking about and express it in numbers, you know something about it - but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. It may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely in your thoughts advanced to the stage of science, whatever the matter may be.


In this case the matter is a bacteria that can divide every 20 minutes, so how long does it take long for one cell to become one million cells?
ekename
 
  3  
Reply Sun 11 Mar, 2018 09:41 pm
@Tryagain,
You're just been sprung being forward and I'm nearly ready to fall back.

Which explains why my previous post about your cat and mouse game now shows the correct time, ergo 26 minutes to six.


Quote:
Ok, see that dot in the middle of "youtu.be" in your post below, nod if yes. That tells me you started the video then clicked "copy video URL" , bad boy don't do that.
Quote:

https://youtu.be/AI1e9y5kMt0

Open the video then copy the address bar at the top of the video viz.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9V-zUlrhEE

In the BBCode Editor choose Quote ie. [quotelol]copy the address here[/quotelol]

Copy the https address into the quote box then change each word quotelol to youtube and this is what happens:







Quote:
In this case the matter is a bacteria that can divide every 20 minutes, so how long does it take long for one cell to become one million cells?


But can the bacteria multiply?

This reminds me of my 2^10 times tables.

(2^10 ) x (2^10) is mega while 2 x 10 is 20 and (2 x 10) x (2 x 10) is a lot of minutes.

I'd go blue in the face figuring it all out, so don't hold your breath.

Three girls named Dorothy dash into a bar. What's the barman's name and what does he serve them.

0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Mar, 2018 12:11 pm
Oh lordly, you’re askin’ me after what happened to Rex Tillerson a dyslexic guy who walked into a bra!

Ha! Iffin’ I was a Roman I would walk into that bar, stick two fingers up to the barman and say, "Five beers please."

However in answer to your question: Three girls named Dorothy dash into a bar. What's the barman's name and what does he serve them.


Ok. Let f = females and x = number thereof:

ƒ(x) - - - - < dashes into a bar. The barman whose name is Ben Dover says, "Sorry, we don't cater for functions"



Dorothy thankfully was not harmed by her close encounter with the horny barman – so she had one for the road… Thank you for the graphic reminder.





I’ma sorry to be the one to convey the message that Dorothy’s Pa went and died after leaving instructions that his 17 gerbils are to be shared between his three daughters as follows-

Half the gerbils are to go to the eldest Dorothy, a third of the gerbils are to go to the middle Dorothy and a ninth of the gerbils are to go to the youngest Dorothy.

How could they be divided according to the will - without dissection?



ekename
 
  3  
Reply Fri 16 Mar, 2018 09:51 pm
@Tryagain,
While your (f ∘ g)(x) = f(g(x)) has legs the barman is no cater pillar of strength ergo:

The three Dots enjoy a rum cocktail known as three dots and a dash, in Morse code V, for Victor Y serves.

The inheritance causes much gnashing of teeth, not least of which by the 17 gerbils.

Luckily, only one girl gets a ninth, a second gets a half, and a third gets a third.

They decide to vertically integrate the gerbils and the bizzes iz viz.

GUBER: Clients rent a gerbil for the night
LUBER: The driver picks up along the way
UBER: The gerbil is delivered to your door

And to think it all started with one borrowed gerbil.





0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Apr, 2018 02:25 pm
Eke, your answer enthrals me with its perspicacity and acuity with more than a soupcon of wit. You make I laugh out lood.

In an effort to avoid any discombobulation, I should point out that; Rebecca Holman MMath PhD of Academisch Medisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam, is not the same as the Rebecca Holman who has been appointed editor of The Debrief, Bauer Media's digital brand for ABC1 20-something women.

In my defense it should be noted that I never publish when there is a ‘r’ in the month –so March was out. I hope you noted that two fingers in Roman numerals = V.


Well to be perfectly honest and in my humble opinion, of course without offending anyone who thinks differently from my point of view, but also by looking into this matter with a different perspective and without being condemning of one's view's and by trying to make it objectified, and by considering each and every one's valid opinion, I honestly believe that I completely forgot what I was going to say…


If I said, naturally it’s difficult and limiting for authors to avoid using a linguistic form in this way, for a vast array of grammatical contrasts cannot play a part in what is said. Important stylistic modifications must occur. But it is indubitably a possibility for any author to carry on writing a work missing a particular symbol without producing a paragraph which is a total oddity. And you might not spot anything odd. Or again, you might.

Did you spot what makes that paragraph pretty darn unique?


BTW is it true that one must first DO before one can UNDO?
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 05:05 am
@Tryagain,
Did I spot why that paragraph is unusual?

Did I what not, Tryagain, but thank you, and whilst I laugh out loud too much too, I'm in two minds about that story, as you may know.

Moving on :

That V of yours was an unexpectedly salubrious delight. I'm jiggered up to give you two fingers of finest Crown Royal XR Canadian whisky on the strength of it, no 'e', in whiskey eh?

Q1 - What does Arnie's rebus

M'I

upon waking up after the operation mean?

Q2 - What letter in G A I N S A is denied an appearance?

Q4 - What is the missing letter and number?

Q5 - How many times can you subtract 5 from 4^(3/2)?

Q6 - What explains the higher than expected speed of stars orbiting the outer reaches of the Milky Way galaxy?




Tryagain
 
  3  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 10:25 am
Oh _k_, are you hitting on me already? No ‘e’ in Eke eh! How did you know that after a bottle or two of Crown Royal XR Canadian whisky I’ma anyone’s?


Q1 - What does Arnie's rebus
M'I
upon waking up after the operation mean?

A1 – I’M BACK BABY

Q2 - What letter in G A I N S A is denied an appearance?

A2 - Down hereaways we wud say, piscem natare doces – concerning George W. Bush, speech in Saginaw, Michigan (29 September 2000), referring to a widely reported dispute in the Klamath region of Oregon between farmers with irrigation rights and Native Americans with fishing rights.

Saginaw is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan and only the ‘W’ is missing from GAINSA… So I question ‘Y’

Q4 - What is the missing letter and number?

A4 – T & 3

Q5 - How many times can you subtract 5 from 4^(3/2)?

A - 25

Q6 - What explains the higher than expected speed of stars orbiting the outer reaches of the Milky Way galaxy?

A6 - A very interesting question indeed and if I had been given 5 bucks for every time I have been asked that question I would by now have amassed 500 cents!

At any distance r from the center of a disk every time it revolves you travel a distance of 2*pi*r (the circumference of the circle your path just described). So at a constant number of revolutions per minute, your velocity increases in proportion to r.

The speed of light is 300 million meters per second. If you build a galaxy that's 300 million/(2*pi) = 48 million meters in radius and spin it at one revolution per second, the outer rim will be travelling at the speed of light. Or you could build one 48 meters in radius and spin it as a million revolutions per second and do the same thing.

Don't try any of these experiments at home, though. Time dilation! As objects approach the speed of light, time for them seems to slow down relative to the timeframe of a stationary observer.

Or to paraphrase it another way, the Hubble Constant, the idea that for every megaparsec of distance between us and a distant galaxy, the speed separating them increases by about 71 kilometers per second.

So in simple terms, Light emitted by the galaxies is moving towards us, while the galaxy itself is traveling away from us. So I stand with Einstein when I say that nothing can move faster than light through space, but objects embedded in space can appear to expand faster than the speed of light depending on your perspective.


For example, in my universe 1/2 of 5 is 3. So what is 1/3 of 10?


Newton's third law is: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. If this were true a pendulum would never stop and we would have perpetual motion.

So can anyone assist me to find three prime numbers that add up to 100. Of the three numbers, one of them is more than a third but less than a half of another?

Thank you most kindlee.
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 06:22 pm
On second thoughts – the answer to Q4 should be: Q3.
C'est la vie.
0 Replies
 
markr
 
  4  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 07:54 pm
@Tryagain,
Q5: 1

After the first subtraction, it's no longer 8.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 08:21 am
@ekename,
ekename wrote:
Q2 - What letter in G A I N S A is denied an appearance

Y do you ask?
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 08:22 am
@ekename,
ekename wrote:
Q6 - What explains the higher than expected speed of stars orbiting the outer reaches of the Milky Way galaxy?

If you figure that out, the folks at McDonald Observatory would like to talk to you about co-authoring a paper.
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 01:39 pm
Mein Gott! Merlin returns after more than a decade. I was so worried when I saw your drapes were drawn – but I was relieved to see that all the furniture was real though.

I got the impression that was the entrance exam for McDonald’s.

Eke has to secure 40% to pass… unfortunately s/he only got 40 marks and failed by 40 marks.

What was the maximum mark?


Hi Mark, I may be way off the mark, but I doubt Eke could be that perfidious or duplicitous; not with those beautiful jugs I so want to get a handle on…

I think they may be Delftware.
CalamityJane
 
  3  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2018 08:47 pm
@Tryagain,
Tryagain wrote:

Mein Gott! .....


You rang?
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2018 06:54 am
@Tryagain,
I've been around, but not in this thread, much....

Good to see you, too, Try.
0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Apr, 2018 12:18 am
@Tryagain,
Quote:
Hi Mark, I may be way off the mark, but I doubt Eke could be that perfidious or duplicitous; not with those beautiful jugs I so want to get a handle on…I think they may be Delftware.


O, to be so au fait with faïence, I can see you now with the tin-glazed blue and white jugs round your ears and a song to your lips.



Rebus:

a) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 TOSCORD

b) W H O N C E I L E

c) DIFFER EQUATI

d) REDILS

e) T....... I....... M ....... E ....... ABDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
markr
 
  3  
Reply Wed 18 Apr, 2018 11:34 am
@ekename,
once in a while
partial differential equation
backslider
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Apr, 2018 07:01 am
Sacré bleu C-J, wie lang, ach lange? You may be pleased to know that Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz has been repealed, so watch out for the geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung, and as Alan McTag
used to say, Lang may yer lum reek.


Good advice Drew to stay away from this thread, because no one who has ever posted here has made it to the oval office – just sayin’.

If anyone wants’ the key to that door, they must first suppose you have an algebraic expression involving variables, addition, multiplication, and parentheses.

You repeatedly attempt to expand it using the distributive law. How do you know that the expression doesn’t continue to expand forever?


Note that applying the distributive law to, say, the outer product in (x + y)(s(u + v) + t), yields x(s(u + v) + t) + y(s(u + v) + t) which has more parentheses than before.


Now lets cut to the chase and bite the bullet, if we simply accept that it is impossible to use any continuous variable transformation and instead consider the possibility of discrete variable transformations corresponding to a discrete progression of time we find that all epochs could be strongly equivalent as desired.

The EST expansion mode might then be modeled by the cycle:
A continuous scale expansion going from the scale exp(t/T) to exp((t+Δt)/T).
At t+Δt the factor exp(Δt/T)is eliminated (“thrown away”) since spacetimes of different scales are equivalent. This corresponds to a discrete reduction of the pace of time that changes the proper time increment ds to ds·exp(Δt/T). As a result the pace of atomic time slows down just enough to compensate for the spatial expansion.

The original EST line element reappears with scale exp(t/T). Retuning to step 1 above activates the iteration… So in answer to:

e) T....... I....... M ....... E ....... ABDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

YOU CAN ‘C’ TIME EXPAND.



What may I ask what was the answer to Q5?

0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Apr, 2018 01:26 am
This one's for you girl. Note the stunning performance of Christopher Walken as the lead singer of Urge Overkill.




Every answer that anyone gives on this site is the correct answer and I had -

a) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 TOSCORD .................................9 out of 10 doctors

b) W H O N C E I L E .....................................once in a while

c) DIFFER EQUATI ...........................partial differential equations

d) REDILS ............ backslider

e) T....... I....... M ....... E ....... ABDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ ... long time no c



0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Sat 21 Apr, 2018 01:47 am
https://www.mathsisfun.com/algebra/images/xmovern-proof2.gif

https://www.mathsisfun.com/algebra/images/xmovern-proof2.gif

We're lucky markr knows his x^1.5 tables.
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  2  
Reply Sun 22 Apr, 2018 01:36 pm
Eek! Posting at 1:47 ante meridiem – you must live in some far off mystical land and I’ma guessing its to the north of Kathmandu; There's a little marble cross below the town; And a brokenhearted woman. Tends the grave of 'Mad' Carew, While the yellow god for ever gazes down. He was known as 'Mad Carew By the subs at Kathmandu, He was hotter than they felt inclined to tell, But, when all …

Said and done: Quote “Note the stunning performance of Christopher Walken as the lead singer of Urge Overkill.”

Excusez-moi, monsieur. Ce train va-t-il à Kathmandu? Nathan Kaatrud, who took the stage name Nash Kato was and still is the lead singer. You may be thinking of Pulp Fiction and Quentin Tarantino – my advice, don’t post after taking your meds and don’t ANGBAKOOLCKER?

 

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