30
   

What Words Do You Use that "Date" You?

 
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 10:06 am
@roger,
I never said groovy and no one else said it seriously. I think that it is one of those urban legends of the 60s, like the bra burning that never happened.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 10:09 am
@Phoenix32890,
When our first television arrived in 1949, the first show I remember watching featured Gabby Hayes. I have always said that is why I find bearded men attractive.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 10:42 am
@plainoldme,
Quote:
I never said groovy and no one else said it seriously.


I used to say "groovy" quite a bit!
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 10:57 am
@Phoenix32890,
I never said groovy and probably didn't hear it much either - maybe on tv.

When I read that Howdy Doody might have started at 5 o'clock, I said, no, 4:30. I've no idea if that memory is right.

I still say porte-cochere if appropriate... which isn't often in Albuquerque.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 11:05 am
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
I still say porte-cochere if appropriate...


I laughed when I saw it on the list. I've used it recently - and didn't have to explain it.

I was impressed as I was speaking with a group of people mostly in their 20's, and I wasn't sure they'd understand the reference.
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 12:14 pm
@ehBeth,
I had to look it up.
I never knew that was a name for those things.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 12:21 pm
@Phoenix32890,
People always said it in such a way that you knew they were kidding or in a context where it was a joke.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 12:29 pm
I rarely hear the word "insegrevious" anymore, in fact, I've quit using it.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 02:38 pm
@ehBeth,
There are some houses that I admire with beautiful porte-cocheres. Ah, spell check dislikes the s at the end of cochere. Nope, it doesn't like cochere.

Actually, that's a feature that could be revived for several houses. No, not a carport, but a real porte-cochere. Too bad I don't have a side door!
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 05:14 pm
paradigm
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 05:18 pm
chronosynclastic infundibulum
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 10:32 pm
@dyslexia,
As in subvert the dominant paradigm? I guess that is out of date.
0 Replies
 
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2011 11:14 pm
So...."groovy" wasn't real to begin with....GD hippies and their GD lies.....so let me guess there really wasn't a magic bus either was there.

****, I'm gonna go stand in front of my shrine to G. Gordon Liddy for a few hours....dang flower children....I hope all your tie die machines break.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 Jan, 2011 12:03 am
@dyslexia,
dyslexia wrote:
paradigm
That one is extant and beneficial.





David
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 07:46 am
Any catchphrase lifted from Monty Python.

Solidarity, Reg! Symbolic of your struggle against reality. Just a flesh wound. Have you got any cheese in this shop? He must be the king, he ain't got **** all over him. Big bitey teeth. And now for something completely different. She turned me into a newt. Very small stones. I see, I see, I get the picture.

Simpsons too. Excellent! D'oh! One of your drones from sector 7-G. Well everything looks bad if you remember it. It's funny coz it's true.

I wonder how much longer I can use 'tiny little lady testicles'?

plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 10:31 am
@hingehead,
Sadly, that is true.

You know what is also out of date? Any reference to Jean-Paul Sartre.

Several years ago, my then boyfriend and I took my sons and their friends to a Renaissance Fair. I was reading lots of Simone de Beavoir at the time and learned that Sartre had gone though a period of mental illness during which he imagined he was pursued by a giant lobster.* At the fair, a young couple were selling what is best described as charms, tiny clay objects with loops built into them, designed to wear. One was a red lobster, probably a lobstah, symbolic of Boston. I picked it up, waggled it at my boyfriend and, in a menacing contralto, said, "Sartre."

My bf, who had been told the Sartre story, laughed. I bought the charm and immediately named the tiny lobster Jean-Paul. The young vendor looked blankly at us, so my bf began to explain about Sartre's delusion. The young man then asked, "Who is Sartre?" My bf and I were floored.

*Of course, that reminded me of the giant hedgehog that pursued Arthur Dimsdale.

But, it also reminded me of how the Catholic Church ran scared from Sartre and Existentialism during the late 60s. My college required a four course sequence in philosophy. The school of philosophy was theistic realism or Thomism or philosophy filtered through Catholic theology. My first text was called A Metaphysics of Authentic Existentialism. It was by Leo Sweeney although in my memory it was either by Jacques Maritain or Etienne Gilson. Just imagine: the Catholic Church thought the bogeyman of the 20th C was Sartre who, in the end, has had so little impact that the second generation hippie kid, selling ceramic charms at a Ren Fair has no idea who he was.

Going off on tangents also date you, especially if they are tangents about the Catholic Church!
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 08:38 am
I still say that some food is "healthful" rather than "healthy." It goes without saying that we should not eat food that is sick (unhealthy).
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 09:20 am
@Phoenix32890,
Phoenix32890 wrote:
When I was young, something that was wonderful was "hot".
HOT used to mean stolen.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 09:38 am
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:
Groovy, baby!
Going with my main squeeze to a hootenanny or was it rent party shindig down the street. My mind has wigged out!
I wonder how far back "baby" goes???
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 09:43 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:
You're English, right? I think the "like" crutch took a while to make its way from America to England. It was a standard of 80's Valley Girl speech. ("Like, gag me with a spoon, like I can't wear such a like totally grody dress, like, as if.")
As well as I can remember, "like" was not much used (except to mean similar)
in the 1940s nor the 30s, but it was certainly well-represented by the Beatniks in the 1950s.





David
0 Replies
 
 

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