9
   

Movies on Christmas anyone? How about New Year's Day?

 
 
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Dec, 2010 10:41 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Be proud Mr. Wandel. I saw it clear as day: Katrina Wandel! Casting assistant!


Thanks, tsar. I will be buying the DVD as soon as it comes out (so that I can play the end credits over and over).
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Dec, 2010 10:56 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

Waiting to hear about The Illusionist.

It's a charming and heartbreaking film. Very little dialogue is spoken and what actually spoken is an odd mix of little English, some kind of Simlish (made up language?), and some short French sentences. No subtitles were used though the story is so simple they are not needed.

The characters wear their emotions on (and up) their sleeves. The characters are the usual typical French odd bird yet they are endearing and can outshine their own quirkiness and eccentricity by how they realistically interact with each other as opposed to being artificially weird that they don't even seem human (the fault that Hollywood sometimes finds itself when it tries to hard to create odd and eccentric characters).

This is proof that cinema or story telling has to follow the Hollywood standard of formulaic storytelling. There are no true villains, though there are a couple of unsavory characters. They are mere blips in the story of the girl and the magician she so dearly admires.

It's a perfect sign of the times though the movie takes place in the mythical 60's where the only true evidence of the outside world is a newspaper headline pitting Khrushchev and Nixon.

I hope this film gets a national theatrical release or at least a very quick turn around into the DVD market. A very beautiful film indeed. Very Happy
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Dec, 2010 10:59 pm
@tsarstepan,
Tried to take a photograph of the credits when her name popped up but managed a blur with my damnable phone camera.... Sorry. Oh and your daughter needs to keep her IMDb page updated! If this is her page:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2536612/
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 12:44 am
@tsarstepan,
http://i51.tinypic.com/szzt5f.jpg
I can't believe I accidentally took a second long video and grabbed her name on the screen. It's the second name from the top. Just trust me on this one! Very Happy
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 01:19 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
. . . It's a perfect sign of the times though the movie takes place in the mythical 60's
where the only true evidence of the outside world is a newspaper headline pitting Khrushchev and Nixon.
MYTHICAL is right. Nixon was Vice President,
pitted against Khrushchev in the 1950s (until Jan. 19, 1961).
As I remember, the kitchen debate was in 1958.
Nixon became President in 1969 (I attended his Inauguration),
when Khrushchev was 5 years dead.





David
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 06:28 am
@tsarstepan,
Thanks! It is still readable. You did me a nice favor.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 06:32 am
@tsarstepan,
nice to hear of this film, i'm a big Tati fan, most of his films were slim of dialogue, with lots of sort of mumbled noises passing between characters
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 06:36 am
@tsarstepan,
Shocked
pirating copyrighted material


well i never






well hardly ever Wink
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 01:34 pm
Did I miss a comparison between this latest version of True Grit and the first one that starred John Wayne?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 01:48 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
I haven't seen the first one so I can't compare the two.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 03:09 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

I haven't seen the first one so I can't compare the two.


The first one was great. Wayne deserved the oscar he received. Duval was excellent as well; as usual. Even Glen Campbell did a surprisingly good job.

Can't say I thought Kim Darby was all that good though. She wasn't able to handle the dialogue the way the others were and her delivery seemed forced and wooden.

I'm looking forward to seeing the new version, but I'm not sure how they can have improved on the original.
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 03:25 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
It is interesting that Jeff Bridges and John Wayne were both 61 years old when they filmed True Grit. The filming was a great deal more difficult for John Wayne because he had already had a lung removed (cancer).
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 05:34 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
I'm looking forward to seeing the new version, but I'm not sure how they can have improved on the original.
They dont according to Roger EBert. The Coens make it their own in several fashions that he didnt elaborate. Im anxious to see it also. Im a sucker for westerns as long as they capture something.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 05:40 pm
@farmerman,
According to the film reviews I read, the Coens' version is much more faithful to the original novel in terms of plot and texture then the John Wayne version.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 06:03 pm
@tsarstepan,
john waynes was a vehicle for john wayne.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Dec, 2010 06:04 pm
@farmerman,
So I've heard.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Jan, 2011 06:31 pm
@tsarstepan,
We went to see True Grit and were not disappointed. The movie showed the range of capability of Jeff Bridges. He "fit" the role of a drunken, smelly, mean as a snake, Rooster Cogburn, wheras the original Rooster Cogburn had to "fit" the personna of a John Wayne.
The latest story takes a slight different tack by ending years later and by putting some little Coen brothers tricks .

The little girl, who, I understand, was a walk-on audition , was a marvelous choice.
penultimately, the Victorian speech patterns , similar to the styles of McMurtry , were wonderful. The speech patterned paced the movie.

LAstly, the cinematography was masterful. Theres been a real play to undersaturate and " tint with depression" , the colors and shots of recent westerns and all of Cormack Mcarthy's screenplay adaptations. Not so here. The shots and framing were very well done (IMHO) and the colors were not gaudy, but were fully spectral..
The shots were close-in, some panned around, and others were shot for framing. I liked em all.
Cinematography has been talking it in the ass for several years in my mind. I loved the concept of all the Spiderman movies but disliked how dark they were all shot ( color value wise). Lots and lots of movies are doing this to give a phony noir look and it doesnt work in most cases.
0 Replies
 
 

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