13
   

Should a movie be punished by an R rating simply because of an X number of F-bombs?

 
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 01:14 am
@chai2,
They were yours, why do you think they left here? Because we were too tolerant towards Catholics that's why. Their legacy runs deep through modern America. Take Thanksgiving for example. That's not even a thing over here let alone a holiday.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 01:24 am
@chai2,
Quote:
Word Origin and History for rooster
n.

1772, agent noun from roost (v.); earlier roost cock, c.1600, in sense of "the roosting bird." Favored in the U.S. originally as a puritan alternative to cock (n.) after it had acquired the secondary sense "penis" (and compare roach).


http://www.dictionary.com/browse/rooster
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 02:16 am
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

Btw the Puritans weren’t “ours” they started in England. I’ve never met a one.


Where do you think the religious right came from?
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 08:03 am
@izzythepush,
That doesn negate the fact that they originated in England, and lasted her about it a hundred or so years.

I guess it’s the “your puritans “ that bugs me. Reminds me of a professor in college who was probably about 1% Native American who would say things to the class (who were obviously all cultures), “when YOUR people were killing MY people....”. I finally approached him after class and told him “When your people were being killed MY people were halfway around the world and didn’t even know Your people existed. “


izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 09:28 am
@chai2,
Lots of things you have originated over here, not least the language. After the Restoration nobody wanted anything to do with the Puritans. That wasn't the case where you are.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 10:07 am
@izzythepush,
No one. As is not one single solitary person from that time until today.

I see.

I'm not trying to fight izzy, but statements like "no one" and "your" group of xyz is silly.

I'm more interested in what you meant by saying "we" gave up roosters.

Roosters?
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 10:49 am
@chai2,
You use the word rooster, and still do, instead of cock because cock can also mean penis. I thought that was pretty clear. Rooster is not used over here unless discussing certain films starring John Wayne or the remake by the Coen brothers.

That and your use of bathroom when you mean lavatory are examples of how American English is more prudish than the original.

We go the other way, most of the time we call the lavatory the bog.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 11:16 am
@izzythepush,
Lavatory isn't even considered to be English here. It's seen as posh and show-offy and somewhat French. We say we're going to the can unless we're going to be washing our hands - in which case we're going to the washroom.

__

That whole rooster thing was confusing til your most recent post.

You won't find people saying cock for rooster in my home region as it sounds like coque - which is French of course and MUST be avoided at all costs. Cock for penis, that's the norm. But cock for rooster - again, showoffy and Frenchy. Nope.

It's a funny region. They're proud of being UEL but don't much care for the English or French (other than Queen Elizabeth and her family).

__

Always interesting to hear/read how differently people use language, and how others perceive it.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 11:54 am
@ehBeth,
What about bog? Is that show offy as well? Or shitter?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:06 pm
@izzythepush,
Bog means a place to grow cranberries here so if you said you were going to the bog , people would think that you were planning a trip to going cranberry harvesting- which would probably result in confusion all round.

They'd know what shitter meant but wonder why you don't just say can.

__

but yeah, generally English visitors are thought to use show-offy language a lot. It seems to have to do with the casual use of French/French-influenced words. The bias is certainly much stronger where I come from than here, but you do see raised eyebrows here on occasion as well - as in, you see that, fancy words again. It's most pronounced (the anti-bias) among Canadians whose families have been here the longest. Immigrants to Canada seem to be much more accepting of differences. My dad's been living in my hometown for over 60 years - he's still seen as a newcomer, and since he learned English from British officers his language use is seen as suspect by some.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:10 pm
@ehBeth,
We never call it the can. Too Suzy Quatro.

0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:12 pm
@ehBeth,
We may have used French words in the past, but not any more, it's so passé.

Loads of words are French influenced, like parliament, and beef.
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:13 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

chai2 wrote:

Btw the Puritans weren’t “ours” they started in England. I’ve never met a one.


Where do you think the religious right came from?

No other wrong assumption has ever been made. Our religious right did not grow out of the Puritan branch of the Protestant Church.

Our religious right came from the evangelical movement. An insanely different beast and region (and a rather boring/boorish transgression from the OP topic).
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:19 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
(and a rather boring/boorish transgression from the OP topic).


the OP is about use of language

and here people are - talking about use of language

__

transgression? really?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:25 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
Take Thanksgiving for example. That's not even a thing over here let alone a holiday.


Thanksgiving is a harvest festival.

https://metro.co.uk/2016/09/21/when-is-the-harvest-festival-and-what-is-it-all-about-6142319/

Quote:
The Harvest Festival tradition pre-dates Christianity and dates back to the pagan times and the name derives from the Old English word Haerfest meaning ‘Autumn’. There are some customs and traditions including Lammas Day on August 1 where people are encouraged to take a loaf of bread to their church service to celebrate the reaping of the crops. St Michael’s Mass on September 29 celebrates the end of the harvest season and is celebrated with a huge feast. People often eat geese on this day, celebrate with fairs, market stalls and decorating churches with autumnal colours and produce.


for the most part, the harvest season is a bit later in North America ... as are our harvest festivals, including Thanksgiving

this bit pretty much defines Thanksgiving

celebrated with a huge feast. People often eat geese on this day, celebrate with fairs, market stalls and decorating churches with autumnal colours and produce.

depending on your region, turkeys replace geese. Where I come from, it's Canada Goose in the old cookbooks - with a stuffing that is very much a derivative of haggis

ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:26 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

We may have used French words in the past, but not any more, it's so passé.


Shocked

Very Happy
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:27 pm
@tsarstepan,
Why do you think said film can be watched by anyone over here as long as their parents say it's OK but they have to be over 18 where you are.

I'm talking about at the cinema.

I think it's because Americans are more prudish about profane language and I said why. I think it goes back to the beginning when Puritans used rooster instead of cock because cock suddenly started having other meanings. I also gave bathroom as an example, you call a toilet that has no bath a bathroom. Over here only rooms with baths are called bathrooms.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:28 pm
@ehBeth,
We have the Harvest festival too, we call it Harvest festival.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:35 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
I also gave bathroom as an example, you call a toilet that has no bath a bathroom. Over here only rooms with baths are called bathrooms.


do you commonly have rooms that only have toilets? no sink or bath

it's a rare thing here

most rooms with toilets here have at least a sink - which turns them into washrooms - and is the most common usage. in homes, the toilets tend to be in rooms that have sinks and bathtubs - which turns them into bathrooms.

the only place you really find a place to **** without a sink within reach is in an outhouse - which might be called a bog in some parts of cottage country here (which are also in cranberry bog territory, funnily enough) . can an outhouse be a toilet?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2018 12:39 pm
@izzythepush,
Channeling Setanta?
 

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