9
   

a xmas tradition

 
 
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 11:37 am
It always started on thanksgiving which was always at my grandmother's house. Any number of relatives and family friends would show up at grandmothers and she with help from my mother and my aunt would fix a turkey, a ham, a roast beef, potatoes, yams, dressing, fruited jello, pickels/olives, fresh baked bread and rolls etc. After dinner would be pies including mincemeat, pumpkin, apple an cherry. when all was done the men would kick back and light their cigars using their plates covered with gravy and all as ash trays. My father would then say to his 3 sons "well, so what do you boys want for xmas this year" while writing in his notbook our answers. We would each answer things like, "I would really like a warm winter coat" my next brother would say "I'd like a t.v. stand, the card-board box doesn't work all that well" and my little brother would say "I'd like a skate-board" "well all right" our father would say as he flicked his cigar ash onto a lump of potatoes, my shopping list is done.

Come xmas, we would get our presents "from santa" each and every one of us would get exactly the same thing; perhaps a BBQ grill or a electric skillet or perhaps a telescope but never ever would we get anything similar to what we asked for. One year we all got brown parkas all x-tra large. It was the same story every year, anything we might have asked for would never be our gift. Perhaps it was his idea of humour, we never knew but as we aged into our 30's and 40's we all would ask for gift certificates which we usually got. One year my mother asked for a dish-washer, he got her a case of Dove face soap. this tradition continued until both my brothers were dead.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 9 • Views: 914 • Replies: 12
No top replies

 
PUNKEY
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:07 pm
Sounds like me with the 12 year old granddaughters. I have NO idea where to get that stuff and the elctronic stuff is too complicated. (Hot Topic store? too loud and too crowded)

I will take them shopping. they love to do that.

Asking someone what they want for xmas is no promise you will deliver. It just might be a mindless question.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:11 pm
@PUNKEY,
yeah punkey, I'm sure you're right.
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:14 pm
At least he asked.

That may have been his way of finding out where your head was. If you would have asked for a Ferrari, then he would have given a reaction, I'm sure.

Maybe he was looking for "sensible" requests.
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:14 pm
It's really a power trip and form of control by the asker. I've heard about this from various people throughout my life and it was often an indicator of an unhappy childhood. What better way to tweak children's emotions than to give them hope, only to smash it at the finish with disappointment.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:17 pm
@dyslexia,
I'd like a Ferrari, please...
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:46 pm
One of the saddest versions of this I ever heard was from a college friend who grew up in an overly religious family. His parents would tell the kids if they were good and prayed hard enough Jesus would send Santa with whatever they asked for. It often seemed to work because he would ask in prayer for some toy and it often appeared under the tree. When he was about 9, his sister got some form of cancer and he prayed for hours that she would get well by Christmas, he also started to do all sorts of volunteer work around his neighborhood trying to win points from Jesus. His sister died a few days before the holiday and for years he thought it was because he didn't pray and work hard enough.
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 12:47 pm
@Rockhead,
I don't think anyone was asking you. Try Santa.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 05:51 pm
@Green Witch,
Quote:
It's really a power trip and form of control by the asker. ..... What better way to tweak children's emotions than to give them hope, only to smash it at the finish with disappointment.


over and over and over and ..... Bastid.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Dec, 2010 06:50 pm
I can certainly relate to botched childhood Christmases. It is a major part of why I celebrate it so faithfully as an adult.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2010 01:25 am
@dyslexia,
Quote:
... My father would then say to his 3 sons "well, so what do you boys want for xmas this year" while writing in his notbook our answers. We would each answer things like, "I would really like a warm winter coat" my next brother would say "I'd like a t.v. stand, the card-board box doesn't work all that well" and my little brother would say "I'd like a skate-board" "well all right" our father would say as he flicked his cigar ash onto a lump of potatoes, my shopping list is done.

Come xmas, we would get our presents "from santa" each and every one of us would get exactly the same thing; perhaps a BBQ grill or a electric skillet or perhaps a telescope but never ever would we get anything similar to what we asked for. One year we all got brown parkas all x-tra large. It was the same story every year, anything we might have asked for would never be our gift. Perhaps it was his idea of humour, we never knew but as we aged into our 30's and 40's we all would ask for gift certificates which we usually got. One year my mother asked for a dish-washer, he got her a case of Dove face soap. this tradition continued until both my brothers were dead.


One could ask what exactly was the point of him asking each year, since he clearly believed "father knows best".
But, of course, he enjoyed it.
Asking what you all wanted. Noting it all down in his book.
Building up hopes & expectations in his children. Say nothing of his wife. (Not that any of you asked for all that much, really.)
Only to dash them.
I hope you don't take offense at my assessment of your father's behaviour, dys, but he sounds like a sadist to me.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2010 01:43 am
I "discovered" Christmas when we got our first tv.

Hey, said I. Presents? Who's the guy in the red suit?

And so a tradition was born.

My aunt took me to see the real Santa Claus at Macy's. My grandmother lent me one of her extra large stockings to hang up. I hung it on a credenza. Asked my parents how Santa could get in through a credenza. My mother conceded that he came in through the window.

Presents Christmas morning. Wonderful fun stuff. I was hooked.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2010 01:56 am
In our family we have the tradition of writing a "Wish list" of the things one would like to have. The list can have anything on it an be as long as you want.
But everybody - especially the children - knows that it will be just a few things from the list you will get. The gifts can be a mixture of things from the list and some suprises.
I think a list like that is good and it does not put the hopes up too much.
Now we are all grown up and we still do it. It is part of the fun of Christmas.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Lola at the Coffee House - Question by Lola
JIM NABORS WAS GOY? - Question by farmerman
OBVIOUS TROLL - Question by Setanta
Surgery--Again - Discussion by Roberta
LOST & MISPLACED A2K people. - Discussion by msolga
Soon to be world traveler, Dog willing! - Discussion by Stacey the red baron
The Bah! Humbug! Christmas thread. - Discussion by msolga
A good cry on the train - Discussion by Joe Nation
Why all the Decryptonite stuff? - Question by Tes yeux noirs
Oh rest ye, Merry Gentleman - Discussion by jespah
 
  1. Forums
  2. » a xmas tradition
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 10/22/2019 at 08:29:39