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Anyone Have an IKEA Mattress?

 
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 11:13 am
@sozobe,
I used to sell beds and mattresses. Pls forgive me if I don't address all issues or explain myself fully or cover issues you aren't even asking about. I'll try to address what you're asking. Let me know if I succeed. Also, forgive me if I repeat others comments. My purpose is to answer and provide some general bedding questions others might have and that you might have too. I haven't read much of the thread but I will go back after I post this.

1. you can often use your old headboard (not just resting on it cosmetically) and get it fitted to a metal frame, hooking up the headboard and/or footboard) and supporting the bed above ground. An experienced quality bedding store will help accommodate your need to connect the headboard. There are adapters hardware kits that solve most hookup problems. IKea is not a specialty bedding store. They sell beds and furniture but generally are not much more than clerks - not experienced
'bedding technicians'. Go to a good furntiture or bedding store (not Mattress Discounters, etc.) and tell them your need to connect the headboard to support your whole bed.

Note: Be aware that boxsprings don't do the job properly resting directly on the floor. Some people try to get away with this, though i know you're not. By doing so, you actually shorten the lifetime of a mattress and get less than optimal spinal support. Often times you'll void a mattress mfr warranty if the boxspring is found to be resting on the floor.

2. once you've decided on a high quality mattress, the most important issue should be using and/or purchasing a new boxspring. Due to the physics of support, the boxspring and its ability to provide comfy support (and good spinal health and good rest) requires a boxspring that's well-designed and supports evenly.

3. regarding the issue of bed height, you need to know that in the market there is/are high profile (approx 7-8 in) and low profile (4 in) boxsprings. Regardless of the bed height, both hi and lo profiles boxsprings support you equally well.

Also be aware that mattresses can and are now generally 12-15 inches thick. They are one-sided, no-flip for the last 8 yrs in North america. This means that the 'bottom' side is not a sleep surface, due to fire safety/protection laws.

BTW, for those that haven't purchased sheets in a while, sheets are now generally all deep-pocketed to fit the higher mattress thicknesses.

General mattress info

4. mattresses have a limited lifetime of support and comfort far less than they are aware of. Most people spend less on mattresses and are expecting more then they should. They keep them far longer than they should.

Based on my experience and industry knowledge, as a general rule if you spend less than $700 on a queen sized mattress, expect it to last less than 7 yrs. Most people keep the mattress & boxpring combo about 12-15 yrs, which is 8 yrs past their effective lifespan.

5. if you can measure a deflection (dip) when you view the mattress bare and measure a dip of greater than 3/4 of an inch away from the plane of being flat, the mattress AND boxspring should be replaced.

What did you say? That's menas that people keep their beds PAST almost twice their comfort lifetime. Most people are also unaware of the reasons why they get poor sleep or have chronic backaches 'til they get rid of their beds and get new and better quality ones. Sorry, but if you spend less than (approx) $700, you'll be back to sore back and poor sleep within a year.

As an example, my personal bedding purchase (limited income) was $1500 for boxspring and mattress. I'm already at the 10-yr-point and it's still flat and supports very well.

I'll post this now and re-edit it if I missed anything.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 01:02 pm
Also, allow me to state something that might be misleading about headboards and/or footboards. When you use a metal frame for the mattress-boxspring combo, you do NOT HAVE TO hook the headboard on for support of the bed. They can be solely for ornamental purposes (or resting head purposes like when reading); however, when you do want the headboard attached for convenience etc., there are hardware kits in most cases that allow you IF there are some sort of slots on the headboard and/or footboard. The hardware kits allow adaptation for different width and spacing of these slots. Typically they run from $25-50. Of course, handyman installation labor is extra.

Oh, yes..then there's the added potential for more squeaking noises. Ummm..there you're on your own.

Alternatively, see the link 'How to Transform Your Bed with a Floating Headboard"
http://www.hgtv.com/home-improvement/installing-a-floating-headboard/index.html
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 01:54 pm
@sozobe,
When researching some reviews of Ikea mattreresses I found the following:

"Ikea memory foam mattresses have better owner satisfaction than Ikea spring beds and somewhat lower satisfaction than Ikea latex mattresses.

The mattresses use low density memory foam.

The main complaints for Ikea memory foam mattresses include excessive firmness, premature sagging / body impression development, initial odor and heat retention.

Main praises include pain reduction and value / low cost"

My personal experience with selling and trying memory foam (is your's memory foam material?) backs up what the reviewers stated as neagatives.

When I bought my previously mentioned bed, I chose a hybrid mix of traditional inner-spring technology and state-of-the art latex. This seems to have worked out for me the best of all those I tried. I feel my decision worked out due to the 10 yrs of no problems wih sag, smells, heat retention and/or body impressions.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 10:24 pm
waits
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 11:12 pm
@Ragman,
I almost mentioned heat retention and thus liking the idea of legs to the frame so there's some air under there - I remember the days with our foam futon.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 06:59 am
@Ragman,
I can tell you put a lot of work into that, thanks for taking the trouble.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 07:51 am
@sozobe,
Thanks. I just hope the info I presented and opinions I expressed is/are useful to you and to others. You didn't say so should I assume it's not?

sometimes on A2K the subject matter happens to be in my wheel-house of expertise. I hope it mwas somewhat useful to you. I'm sure the deicsion is a hard thing to deal with...exspecially when this issue affects areas of your comfort, health and budget. However so many people dismiss this as a more trivial issue than it is and then suffer in silence for years as their new or not-so-new mattress slowly loses support and comfort and subsequently causes back problems and loss of sleep.

I explained this to a friend of mine that the difference for me, after I spent years going to chiropracters and taking muscle and pain relief meds, that sometimes relief is as simple as getting a better mattress/boxspring combo. Certainly it's not the solution for all, but it is for a larger percentage than most people are aware of.

Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 08:02 am
@ossobuco,
Remember that the old foam materials we used to use on futons in the late '60s thru the '70s are a far different material than this new 'memory foam'. This is a different beast. That old foam meterial was a petrochemical by-product and with age and exposure to sunlight would crumble and degrade fairly quickly. At best it is good for comfort for a year or so. Think of it as to be used in a guest room - used for a short-term stays. before it looses it shape and effective lifespan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_foam

"Memory Foam is polyurethane with additional chemicals increasing its viscosity and density. It is often referred to as visco-elastic polyurethane foam. It is also referred to as low-resilience polyurethane foam. In some formulations, it is firmer [stiff] when cooler. Higher-density memory foam reacts to body heat, allowing it to mold to a warm body in a few minutes. A lower-density memory foam is pressure-sensitive and moulds quickly to the shape of a body pressing against it, returning to its original shape once the pressure is removed."

BTW here is some hazard info for some memory foam materials:

"Hazards: When new, some memory foams give off a distinct chemical odor, which many people find unpleasant and some say is akin to the smell of paint. This odor decreases with airing, but some remain sensitive. Emissions from memory foam mattresses may cause more respiratory irritation than other mattresses. Mildew and house dust mites may not occur as frequently, so asthma attacks may be less frequent and severe. [3]

"Memory foam, like other polyurethane products, can be combustible.[4] State and US Federal Laws have been enacted in the USA to require all bedding, including memory foam items, be resistant to ignition from an open flame such as a candle or cigarette lighter. New bedding laws that went into effect in 2010, change the Cal-117 Bulletin for FR testing.[5] There is concern that high levels of the fire retardant PBDE, commonly used in memory foam, could cause health problems for users. [6] PBDE's are no longer used in most bedding foams, especially in the European Union.

Manufacturers caution about leaving babies and small children unattended on a memory foam mattress, as they may find it more difficult to turn and rotate and may suffocate."
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 08:07 am
@Ragman,
It's good background, so I appreciate it.

I went into high research mode when I was deciding what to get for sozlet -- this thread was only one arm of it -- and became pretty convinced that an IKEA mattress is the way we want to go with this.

The one we're looking at isn't actually memory foam (though they have that). Here's the description of the one we're probably going to get:

Quote:

- A 2" thick layer of latex provide high pressure-relieving capacity, enabling your body to relax more fully.
- Lamb's wool in the filling and lyocell in the ticking transport moisture away and provides a pleasant sleeping climate with an even temperature.
- High-resilience foam with pressure-relieving capacity provides good comfort.
- 5 comfort zones relieve pressure on your shoulders and hips.
- Machine washable cover; easy to keep clean.


We were able to do a test-drive with sozlet's mattress, she loves it and I'm very happy with it. While we haven't had it long enough to test for longevity, I was able to compare some things to reviews right away, like odor and being shorter than some reviewers expected. We did have to let it unfurl for about three days, and there was definitely odor at first. After those three days, though, the odor dissipated and it unfurled to the advertised length.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 09:50 am
@sozobe,
{Edit}: I just reread your recent reply and noticed you wrote :
Quote:
2" thick layer of latex.
Be aware that the more latex just below the comfort layer (of wool or other material). The better your mattress will be and the more expensive too. Ideally the latex layer should be 6 inches, but 4 inches is a good compromise.

I should have added in my previous reply. My intent as far as advice directed towards you in specific was about the mattress/boxspring info for your mattress. When it comes to a child's mattress choice, within a reasonable quality design and construction, you'll be pretty happy with that choice.

I just noticed that you said the mattress is NOT Memory Foam. If so, and it's the older-style foam, be aware that regular foam can degrade quickly. I would keep an eye on it - and if you notice changes over the next couple of years - reconsider keeping it. 'Old technology' foam degrades and crumbles.

Also, unless treated with a germ retardant solution it can retain smells and can encourage germs and or mites to embed themselves. Sorry if this sounds alarming. It could be that your choice is not one that needs this warning, but others should be so forewarned and forarmed as to this possibility.

Also, kids are so lightweight (and resilient) that mattress buying considerations are pretty different than for adults. Adult mattress purchases take into account issues like body weight and distribution, personal comfort and the effects of years of wear and tear on their spinal column etc. Doing yoga and getting massage cannot make up for a poorly supporting mattress for adults. One night's poor sleep is too much for me, but years of it is just an unnecesary inconvenience.

Kids bounce back so quickly and, as long as the mattress is not either a rock or some sagging, lumpy deal, they're can get along just great.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 10:11 am
@Ragman,
oops...correction for the sake of clarity:
I meant something different than what I wrote:
Quote:
just noticed that you said the mattress is NOT Memory Foam.
That advice was meant to say that the mattress you choose is for you and your hubby..not about the choice for your daughter's mattress, which you made clear IS Memory Foam.

Further clarifying...the ideal mattress combo is a mattress layered with a combo of Memory Foam layered with newer technology Latex (4 to 6 in) and a top-most layer of comfort (wool or other suitable) material (again possibly memory foam) that maintains its shape over time.

Furthermore, often times you will lose your mind trying to remove the machine washable cover. And if not in its removal, you'll lose it trying to fit it back on the mattress. It's a 2-person job ... with both people not talking to one another after the 2nd time you try doing it.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 10:45 am
@Ragman,
Actually, nope, the one I chose for my daughter wasn't memory foam either. This is hers:

Quote:
- A 1" thick layer of latex provides high pressure-relieving capacity, enabling your body to fully relax.
- 5 comfort zones relieve pressure on your shoulders and hips.
- High-resilience foam with pressure-relieving capacity provides good comfort.
- Lamb's wool in the filling transports moisture away and provides a pleasant sleeping climate with an even temperature.
- Machine washable cover; easy to keep clean.
- Reversible. Use both sides for even wear and long-lasting comfort.


I'll clarify a bit about what I was asking.

Part one (November 2010): Should I go ahead and get an IKEA mattress for my daughter?

My decision -- based on advice here, lots of research, lots more advice, my previous experience with IKEA as a company, and her previous experience with an IKEA mattress (she loved it) -- led me to say "yes." I'm very happy with that decision so far.

Part two (February 2011): Would it work to put an IKEA foam + latex mattress on top of my existing box spring? Do you have other ideas for how I can handle the variables of a) comfort b) height and c) compatibility?

We've really already decided to get an IKEA foam + latex mattress for ourselves (based on all of the above re: my daughter, with added factors due to us being adults). I'm just trying to figure out the best configuration.

I think what I've settled on is an ~ 8 inch mattress on top of this:

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/images/products/sultan-alsarp-foundation-with-storage-white__40857_PE134837_S4.jpg

Which is about 1 foot tall. My headboard "starts" 19 inches from the ground, so that should be fine. (12" + 8" = 20".)

I might add 5" legs, which would bring the total height to exactly the same height as our current configuration.

I'm still considering JPB's suggestion to just go ahead and try putting the mattress on top of the box spring and seeing how that works.

But the point is -- we've already decided which mattress we're getting.

That said, I do appreciate you sharing your expertise and I agree that even though it doesn't directly apply to what I'm asking now, it may be useful for others reading along or who find this via Google.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 12:57 pm
@sozobe,
If what I am reading is correct, you're thinking of trying to use an old boxspring as your foundation, I strongly advise against doing so. The most advisable situation is to buy a new boxspring of decent quality and construction.

However, the boxspring you show in that pic is fine, but be aware IKEA or (somewhere else) may have a lower profile version. Perhaps they may sell this at IKEA. If not them, then someone else CERTAINLY does. If the clearance issue of that height is too great then the reduction in height is accomplished with the lower profile boxspring -not the matttress.

Also an 8 inch mattress of any sort is not advisable either. This sort of mattress will not maintain its mcomfort for typical 10 yr span. Thus making it poor choice economy-wise, not too mention spine support-wise.

Now, back to Nora Jones CD listening.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 12:57 pm
@sozobe,
Quote:
I'm still considering JPB's suggestion to just go ahead and try putting the mattress on top of the box spring and seeing how that works.

I would advise against it...putting a mattress on the wrong support system is rarely a good idea.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 01:00 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
Also an 8 inch mattress of any sort is not advisable either.
IKEA bedding is a completely different product from American bedding of the last few generations, your knowledge base is not much help in making a good IKEA bedding choice.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 01:22 pm
@sozobe,
Allow me to state (at the risk of being repetitious) for an adult a 1-in-thick layer of latex is not nearly enough support, unless it's the top-most layer and what is underneath it is 4-6 in layer of sutiable support material.

However, for a child 1-in layer of latex could be acceptable as the child does not create much pressure (per square inch) on that surface.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 01:24 pm
@hawkeye10,
I disagree with your statement (about an adult-purpose bed) as my information is not based on US materials alone. However, my intent is not to get into debate or argument over this info. this is what my research has given me as a consumer and former bedding salesman. i might be mistaken, but I don't think so.

I've gone to Ikea's site and have studied the materials (density etc) they use in their mattresses from the entry level to the top-level. These materials are inadequate for adult comfort over the long-haul. A 10-yr mattress is what I'm advising. their tope-end mattress is queen sized is $459. The economics/value of such a mattress does not compete wll at all with a mattress that costs $800$-1200. BTW, many mattress mfr offer a lifetime comfort guarantee as well.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 01:53 pm
@Ragman,
oops..slight correction:
Ikea's top-of-the-line bed is qn sized adult bed is $509 for SULTAN FJORDGARD Latex and foam mattress


It is made up of:

Comfort material: 20 % natural/ 80 % synthetic latex
High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft.,
100 % lamb's wool

At a bit more than $509 in the bedding market place there are far superior mattresses that will maintain their comfort for an adult for ther 10-15 yr lifetime of mattress.

I feel that this is not a good buy. Yes, it is cheaper initially in price but not more economical in the long run.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 01:57 pm
@Ragman,
Well, no. Their most expensive mattress in a queen size is $899.00.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60109592

That's not the first factual error I've noticed by the way (one other that I can think of now was just a quote -- low resilience foam vs. high resilience foam).

I think I've made clear that I'm pretty comfortable with my research -- which was extensive -- and am not that interested in being debated re: the mattress choice.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 02:02 pm
@sozobe,
I wish you the best in your choice(s). So it's NOT the mattress choices that I've seen on Ikea's site...which are different than the one I saw (SULTAN FJORDGARD Latex and foam mattress) on Ikea's site.

I just looked at your link and see the Qn-sized Sultan ERFJORD for $899. It consists of 7 inches of natural latex provides good pressure-relieving capacity. EXACTLY what I had said earlier...as this is more in line with what I had advised about having 6 in of Latex - NOT 1 or 2 inches. This should be a reasonable bed. Sleep well!

PS..,. my cut-and-paste messed up with the listing of materials ...high-density materials vs lo density foam info from Ikea.
 

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