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Ego

 
 
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2010 12:47 am
In a lecture video, Joseph Campbell discussed how the views on the Ego differ greatly in the eastern and western cultures. On some level they seem to be the same, or maybe they are completely different. What are the differences, if there are any?
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fresco
 
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Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2010 01:01 am
@Homomorph,
Its pretty obvious that "self" is defined relative to "others". It follows that there can be as many "selves", or fluctuating facets of "self" in the same individual as there are social structures to which he is exposed. The "east-west"" division is pretty crude in that respect, and such generalizations are meaningful only with respect to particular purposes on the part of the classifier.
William
 
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Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2010 03:23 am
@fresco,
fresco wrote:

Its pretty obvious that "self" is defined relative to "others". It follows that there can be as many "selves", or fluctuating facets of "self" in the same individual as there are social structures to which he is exposed. The "east-west"" division is pretty crude in that respect, and such generalizations are meaningful only with respect to particular purposes on the part of the classifier.


Fresco, please elaborate a little more on the highlighted portions. Are you talking about an actor? Classifier? Who or what classifier?

Thanks,
William
fresco
 
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Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2010 09:23 am
@William,
"Self observation" reveals inconsistencies which fluctuate over time and according to social context. Some have argued these are "facets" of self, and some have called them separate selves (Gurdjieff quote below)

Quote:
Man such as we know him, cannot have a permanent and single I. His I changes as quickly as his thoughts, feelings and moods, and he makes a profound mistake in considering himself always one and the same person; in reality he is always a different person, not the one he was a moment ago.Man has no permanent and unchangeable I. Every thought, every mood, every desire, every sensation, says "I".
Man has no individual I. But there are, instead, hundreds and thousands of separate small "I"s, very often entirely unknown to one another, never coming into contact, or, on the contrary, hostile to each other, mutually exclusive and incompatible. Each minute, each moment, man is saying or thinking, "I". And each time his I is different. Just now it was a thought, now it is a desire, now a sensation, now another thought, and so on, endlessly. Man is a plurality. Man's name is legion.


Piaget (amongst others) argued that perception is active, not passive. Our fluctuating cognitive state (in accordance with the above) will classify "the world" according to current need. If that "need" is to an establish a simplistic east-west divide, "reality" will conform.

NB Unless you have actually attempted "self observation" the above may not be understood.
GoshisDead
 
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Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2010 11:54 am
@fresco,
fresco wrote:

Unless you have actually attempted "self observation" the above may not be understood.


This seems to be the crux of much of the disagreement that goes on in regards to, identity, ideology, and the ideal. We assume we act up to our ideals, but when observed we fall well short of them. When I point this out many assume that its a personal barb or at the very least pessimistic view on humanity. I however see it as explanitory. I see it as people working to survive and maintain good mental health and social integration.
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