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Building Blocks of Philosophical Thought

 
 
Ding an Sich
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2010 11:29 am
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

So.... could there be a predisposition to philosophical thought? I mean a personality for it.


Could we not say that the personality is dependent upon the person? I do not see philosophical thought as being predisposed to one personality, but many. I could not imagine all philosophical thought being predisposed to a specific personality. That seems silly.

But we can say that there are multiple personalities in philosophic thought; this is characterized by different philosophers (being that there is one or more personality to every philosopher).

littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2010 07:26 pm
@Ding an Sich,
Perhaps you are splitting hairs, Ding?

I didn't mean one personality in particular. I was thinking about "people who tend to be introspective (and/or logical, inquisitive, etc) tend to be more likely to get into philosophy." or something like that.
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Sep, 2010 02:12 am
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

I can't think of ANY philosophers from recent history, really. Nerd to me implies science and math more than philosophy which seems outside of science and math.

You can think of me; if you don't think of me as a philosopher, but think of me thrity years ago when I hopped from bed to bed as easily as a bunny hops between bunches of clover... I only know morality from the far side first, and I was an Adonis... And just as old men never make good lovers, so young men never make good philosophers... To enjoy life is to live in ones emotions, and to deny the pleasures of life their power is to live in ones head...
0 Replies
 
jeeprs
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Sep, 2010 03:51 am
@littlek,
all these points are true and good and very close to the mark. However I would add that knowledge of the subject itself is important - even if not in great detail - starting with the Greek philosophers. They devised the word 'philosophy' (actually it was first bestowed on Pythagoras) and the typical problems and issues they thought about ought to be included in 'understanding philosophy', in addition to the general skills you have mentioned.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Sep, 2010 05:51 am
@jeeprs,
jeeprs wrote:

all these points are true and good and very close to the mark. However I would add that knowledge of the subject itself is important - even if not in great detail - starting with the Greek philosophers. They devised the word 'philosophy' (actually it was first bestowed on Pythagoras) and the typical problems and issues they thought about ought to be included in 'understanding philosophy', in addition to the general skills you have mentioned.

You have to start with learning, and eventually you will get to philosophy, and as you say; If you read about the Greek philosophers you can see they test the limit of reason when it cannot verify with science what is true, or false...
0 Replies
 
 

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