1
   

Should Public Schools Inculcate Values in Students?

 
 
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 10:36 am
@north,
north;138120 wrote:
NO

schools should be passing along knowledge , only


It is not possible for schools to pass along only knowledge. Someone needs to decide what is important for students to learn, and that act alone will cause the implicit transmission of the value of certain knowledge over other knowledge.

With that said, public schools should pass along values such as compassion, self-knowledge, and be taught the value of their citizenship. Parents are generally ill-equipped to pass along the necessary values of a democratic society because most are ignorant to them to begin with. Education's sole goal should be to plant the seeds of citizenship and foster the growth of good citizens.
north
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 11:07 pm
@Theaetetus,
Theaetetus;138625 wrote:
It is not possible for schools to pass along only knowledge. Someone needs to decide what is important for students to learn, and that act alone will cause the implicit transmission of the value of certain knowledge over other knowledge.

With that said, public schools should pass along values such as compassion, self-knowledge, and be taught the value of their citizenship. Parents are generally ill-equipped to pass along the necessary values of a democratic society because most are ignorant to them to begin with. Education's sole goal should be to plant the seeds of citizenship and foster the growth of good citizens.


on what basis then should the necessary values be based on ?

so education by public schools teaches nothing but brain-washing ?

not the ability to learn and question ?

very strange concept of education
Insty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 12:53 pm
@north,
north;138856 wrote:
on what basis then should the necessary values be based on ?

so education by public schools teaches nothing but brain-washing ?

not the ability to learn and question ?

very strange concept of education


Teaching values isn't brain-washing -- at least it doesn't have to be. There's no reason to think that teaching children to be tolerant of other lifestyles or that democracy is better than totalitarianism will stunt their ability to learn and question.

Political regimes do not reproduce themselves automatically. If left to their own devices, not everyone will come to understand basic democratic values (legitimacy based on consent, equal rights, etc.). It's perfectly acceptable -- probably even obligatory -- for a democracy to try to persuade school children that democracy and democratic values are good things.
Jebediah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 01:09 pm
@GoshisDead,
GoshisDead;138183 wrote:
Schools cannot help but impart these values. They must to achieve even the most modest level of classroom management without which no knowledge could be passed on.


Yes, this is it I think. You need to teach some honesty to keep students from cheating on their tests etc.
0 Replies
 
jgweed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 01:37 pm
@Insty,
If we say that schools should pass on knowledge only, then doesn't this imply that it must perforce also pass on the criteria for what constitutes knowledge, as well as a whole cluster of intellectual values that are aligned with that criteria? Teaching any academic subject seems to imply teaching the value of intellectual honesty, critical thinking, and open and free discussion of ideas.
north
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 08:42 pm
@jgweed,
jgweed;139369 wrote:
If we say that schools should pass on knowledge only, then doesn't this imply that it must perforce also pass on the criteria for what constitutes knowledge, as well as a whole cluster of intellectual values that are aligned with that criteria? Teaching any academic subject seems to imply teaching the value of intellectual honesty, critical thinking, and open and free discussion of ideas.


agreed

I was just worried , on my earlier posts , that values would be based on religion

rather than being based on simply being an honest , good person
0 Replies
 
8bit phil
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Mar, 2010 10:36 pm
@Insty,
"I don't think public schools have that obligation, but humans have that obligation to each other." ...Wow, great point. People are always learning, it is what is being taught that is the concern. Currently the government runs the schools, corporations sponsor the government through lobbyists, a select few finance the lobbyists, and "we the people" support the select few...so in an odd way we are ensuring the continuation of this cycle through education. The issue is with the adults of today being content with our society. It is no surprise that India has been an "uncomfortable" place to live for many years for many people, therefore they have pushed education and are now seeing the effects of that push. We are just now seeing the effects of being too comfortable and not making education (school and home) a priority. We assume that everything will remain the same and the world is the same world our parents lived in. It has less to do with text books and more to do with core values and concentrated academic goals. We are failing our kids, it isn't the other way around.
0 Replies
 
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2010 09:04 am
@Insty,
Insty;137398 wrote:
For example, values such as patriotism, tolerance of different viewpoints and sexual orientations, equality, and the like.
- patriotism is a very dangerous thing to teach people, it's essentially the same fanatic people posess towards what they hold dear, an immense love and pride which they will defend fiercely, based on emotional behaviour that overwrite reason and logic.
Politicians will relentless beat on that patriotism drum and rally the emotional people to fight for often a stupid cause.

Too much pride and love kills!

- tolerance is good, but often it becomes a phobia to discuss any relating issues, and it will actually end worse than it started out, but non the less we should have understanding and tolerance.

-------------

Specially for kids who have disfunct parents it would be good to have someone to teach them law, moral and ethics.
0 Replies
 
prothero
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2010 09:19 am
@Insty,
Well at the very least schools must instill the value of knowlege, facts, experience and of reason.
If you can get those across, lots of other problems will get solved.
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2010 09:30 am
@prothero,
prothero;159316 wrote:
Well at the very least schools must instill the value of knowlege, facts, experience and of reason.
If you can get those across, lots of other problems will get solved.
1) how?
2) most knowledge is subjective, sounds good on paper, but doesn't work irl.
3) who's philosophy is the better?
4) experience of buisness, sports, war ..etc are often very dirty, shady ..etc, and not really ideal stuff to teach.
prothero
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2010 09:35 am
@HexHammer,
HexHammer;159322 wrote:
1) how?
2) most knowledge is subjective, sounds good on paper, but doesn't work irl.
3) who's philosophy is the better?
4) experience of buisness, sports, war ..etc are often very dirty, shady ..etc, and not really ideal stuff to teach.
What is it you think schools should be doing then?

Of course there was the old quip, that schools are not good for children and they do not learn much either.
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 May, 2010 09:39 am
@prothero,
prothero;159325 wrote:
What is it you think schools should be doing then?

Of course there was the old quip, that schools are not good for children and they do not learn much either.
Well, I tryed not to say they shouldn't teach such thing, I tryyyeeed (poor attempt) to say how/what. Very Happy
Please elaborate on your ideas.
0 Replies
 
Rwa001
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 09:31 pm
@Insty,
Insty;139364 wrote:
Teaching values isn't brain-washing -- at least it doesn't have to be. There's no reason to think that teaching children to be tolerant of other lifestyles or that democracy is better than totalitarianism will stunt their ability to learn and question.

Political regimes do not reproduce themselves automatically. If left to their own devices, not everyone will come to understand basic democratic values (legitimacy based on consent, equal rights, etc.). It's perfectly acceptable -- probably even obligatory -- for a democracy to try to persuade school children that democracy and democratic values are good things.


Saying that democracy is better than totalitarianism is a judgment call. The student should be given the resources required to come to their own conclusion. When introduced to the alternatives to democracy, each with their own merits and demerits, most students will still hold democracy above the rest. But it's a great disservice to present a judgment as a fact to students.

I go to an incredibly liberal college, and I'm a philosophy major, so I get a double-dose of the left in most of my classes. I find myself having to defend conservative and libertarian ideals (even if just to devil's advocate) just so that there is another view point being represented. Debate is healthy, judgments proposed as truths have to be challenged. This is learning.
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 May, 2010 08:35 am
@Rwa001,
Rwa001;163728 wrote:
Saying that democracy is better than totalitarianism is a judgment call. The student should be given the resources required to come to their own conclusion. When introduced to the alternatives to democracy, each with their own merits and demerits, most students will still hold democracy above the rest. But it's a great disservice to present a judgment as a fact to students.
Please point me to a totalitariam regime that is better than democrasy.
Rwa001
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 May, 2010 11:35 pm
@HexHammer,
HexHammer;163864 wrote:
Please point me to a totalitariam regime that is better than democrasy.


Well what you value in a government would depend on your situation and values. The point is that value judgments shouldn't be taught to students as facts.
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2010 03:10 am
@Rwa001,
Rwa001;164127 wrote:
Well what you value in a government would depend on your situation and values. The point is that value judgments shouldn't be taught to students as facts.
If you dispute it's a fact, then you must have knowledge that contradicts it. And what are those facts you have?
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
DOES NOTHING EXIST??? - Question by mark noble
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 05/21/2019 at 06:30:02