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Is thinking overrated?

 
 
Arjuna
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 04:36 pm
@odenskrigare,
odenskrigare;95887 wrote:
well, obviously
the least trivial thought is mind-blowingly parallel

What's the least trivial thought? Answer: mind-blowingly parallel.

Actually, all copy editing aside, I'd like to know more about what you're talking about there.
0 Replies
 
TickTockMan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 04:53 pm
@Zetherin,
Zetherin;95893 wrote:
No, no, no! This man didn't just say mac!!!! :poke-eye:


Oh yeah. But I guess it's only us creative folks who appreciate the elegance of the Mac, as opposed to the, er, how shall I say it, plebeians who feel more comfortable within the rigid constraints of any form of Windows . . .

Ah ha ha ha ha Ah ha ha ha.

Flame on,

Tock the Unrepentant.
odenskrigare
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 06:46 pm
@TickTockMan,
TickTockMan;95891 wrote:
Well Hell, Odie, that's yer problem dude, you got a Dell. Trade it in for
a new Mac and life will make ever so much more sense!

Tick


I like Macs but I don't have lots of money, so meh

In fact I would have wiped this disk and put Linux on now if it were not for my scanner / laziness

Arjuna;95894 wrote:
What's the least trivial thought? Answer: mind-blowingly parallel.

Actually, all copy editing aside, I'd like to know more about what you're talking about there.


It's easy. Look at how difficult it is to pin down specific neural functions through the holistic imaging techniques fMRI, PET and EEG. Look at all the statistical pitfalls highly educated people easily fall into when looking at the data from these methods. There's so much going on in the brain at once that we have a very hard time figuring out what is exactly responsible for what

It's hard to do "other things being equal" studies with the brain. Much of what we know about specific gross neural functions comes from, e.g., lesion studies like "Tan"

TickTockMan;95895 wrote:
Oh yeah. But I guess it's only us creative folks who appreciate the elegance of the Mac, as opposed to the, er, how shall I say it, plebeians who feel more comfortable within the rigid constraints of any form of Windows . . .


I feel limited by GUIs in general. On Mac OS X you've got Terminal. On WinDOS you've got Cygwin. It's all good, more or less
0 Replies
 
richrf
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 08:52 pm
@vectorcube,
vectorcube;95728 wrote:
Well, i think if you do read a nice book, ponder about a nice argument, and be amazed by an holy equation, then i do think it is useful to use your brain.


I think it is useful to use all that makes up our being. Thinking is but one aspect. There is feeling.

Rich

---------- Post added 10-07-2009 at 09:54 PM ----------

Didymos Thomas;95786 wrote:
It's probably similar to what you have in mind when you say "natural body memory".

Essentially, it's your muscles having certain tendencies due to repetition.

Muscle memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Yes. It is interesting that we refer to it as muscle memory. I know that some musicians and artists are said to have a natural feeling.

Rich

---------- Post added 10-07-2009 at 09:55 PM ----------

TickTockMan;95849 wrote:
Yes. The term "muscle memory" is just a turn of phrase, exactly like richrf's original remark about "natural body memory." No one is suggesting that your muscles have memory in the accepted use of the word.----------------------


I think it is worthwhile noting. There may be more to this turn of a phrase than one might first imagine. I certainly believe so.

Rich
William
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 09:13 pm
@richrf,
Hey Rich, great thread. I am glad you thought of it. Ha! Just kidding. I couldn't resist. Thinking is an amazing phenomenon when you don't think about it. :bigsmile:

Cheers,
William
0 Replies
 
odenskrigare
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 09:18 pm
@richrf,
richrf;95932 wrote:
I think it is useful to use all that makes up our being. Thinking is but one aspect. There is feeling.


Why draw this artificial, Cartesian distinction between thinking and feeling

---------- Post added 10-07-2009 at 11:21 PM ----------

William;95938 wrote:
Hey Rich, great thread


I think it's a fail thread. Reasoning and emotionality exist on a continuum. A basic premise of the thread is rotten
0 Replies
 
Aedes
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 09:26 pm
@richrf,
richrf;95932 wrote:
It is interesting that we refer to it as muscle memory. I know that some musicians and artists are said to have a natural feeling.
You may be referring to something different. To be naturally, innately good at music or whatever other art is a complex, multidisciplinary set of skills that includes artistic inspiration, understanding and mastery of the medium, and the requisite fine motor prowess.

Muscle memory refers to something much more specific that is not confined to playing the piano. It's the "unconscious" performance of a complex motor task. We all do it -- when you button your shirt, brush your teeth, sign your name, scratch your head, pick your nose, whatever, you're doing it without consciously paying attention to the technical performance of this task.

On the other hand, if tomorrow you decide to sign up for an adult ed class in Chinese calligraphy, then you WILL be paying close attention to this motor task.

So even for an amateur musician, playing something enough times induces muscle memory, i.e. you can do it without thinking.

There is a neurological basis for it, which I understand is attributed to spinal motor neurons rather than the cerebral cortex, just as a deep tendon reflex (like when your patellar tendon is struck with a hammer) is a reflex loop that does not involve the brain.
0 Replies
 
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Mar, 2010 07:00 am
@richrf,
richrf;95377 wrote:
There really seems to be an overabundance of focus placed on the ability to think. Leaving the definition of thinking aside for the moment (I think most people will know what I am talking about), I have found that when I am not thinking I am at my best.

Examples: hitting a golf ball, playing tennis, practicing Tai Chi, playing pool, shooting baskets. dancing (definitely dancing), singing, playing the piano, drawing, relating to people, finding a healthy lifestyle, playing the stock market, etc. For all these activities, I am using feeling. It is sometimes called being in the zone. It is when I let go of the willfulness to do something, and let my natural body memory take over.

Memory is an very interesting phenomenon and I think it is much more than simple storage of information. And when body memory is permitted to flow, amazing things start happening like sinking eight baskets in a row, or running a pool table.

Anyway, I think that people are missing a lot if they spend their life relying on thinking. Feeling is another way to go. If you haven't been there yet, look for it!

Rich
Without our thinking, we wouldn't have all our great technology, cellphones, computers, medical tech/procedure ..etc.

....BUT! With eastern philosophy, in the moment of physical action, you need to empty your thoughts, and thereby free the mind of disturbances.
0 Replies
 
odenskrigare
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Mar, 2010 07:03 am
@richrf,
richrf is pretending that motor skills and other kinds of implicit memory aren't related to the nervous system

ps that's kind of dumb
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Mar, 2010 08:38 am
@odenskrigare,
odenskrigare;140240 wrote:
richrf is pretending that motor skills and other kinds of implicit memory aren't related to the nervous system

ps that's kind of dumb
Uhmm..why do you see a headless sea turtle and chicken have good motor skills without their head?

I myself have grapped things falling, without being aware of it, and willfully intend to grap anything.

There is such things as autonom behaviour, maybe it would be a good idea to read into it.
odenskrigare
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Mar, 2010 08:44 am
@HexHammer,
HexHammer;140276 wrote:
Uhmm..why do you see a headless sea turtle and chicken have good motor skills without their head?


Because they've got a brain stem and peripheral system that are intact

When someone cuts the head off of a chicken and doesn't get all the neck it's possible that a bit of brain will be left over

If you cut closer to the body this doesn't happen
0 Replies
 
HexHammer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Mar, 2010 09:06 am
@odenskrigare,
odenskrigare;140240 wrote:
richrf is pretending that motor skills and other kinds of implicit memory aren't related to the nervous system

ps that's kind of dumb
I must confess my assertion of your post has been wrong, I will ask you to disregard to my other statemen alligned to the quote.
0 Replies
 
 

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