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Altered states of consciousness

 
 
Didymos Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jan, 2009 06:24 pm
@Kielicious,
That guy thinks he's Edgar Casey reincarnated? Sounds like a quack to me. On his site it is claimed that he is a professional this that and the other: does he have any credentials? It's one thing to claim to be a professional researcher of ancient civilizations, it's quite another to actually know something about ancient civilizations. I mean, who should I read: this guy or someone with a PhD in the field?
MITech
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jan, 2009 06:32 pm
@Aedes,
Aedes wrote:


Wow that stuff is interesting! Tell us more about synesthetes
0 Replies
 
Aedes
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jan, 2009 06:39 pm
@Alan McDougall,
I don't know too much about the condition, I've never seen it before and I probably never will. There is a very good book about it, though, called The Man Who Tasted Shapes.
0 Replies
 
nameless
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 04:11 am
@Didymos Thomas,
Didymos Thomas;41271 wrote:
I mean, who should I read: this guy or someone with a PhD in the field?

If I were truly interested in a subject, in my gathering of food for thought, I'd read everything that I can get my hands on, leave no rock unturned in my gathering data for critical examination.
But, since you asked; considering your strong affinity for 'credentialed authorities' (as opposed, perhaps, to using your own awesome powers of critical thought?), I wouldn't read or acknowledge in any way anyone's 'thoughts' unless they were formally stamped with 'authority approved credentials'.
0 Replies
 
xris
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 11:08 am
@Didymos Thomas,
Didymos Thomas wrote:
That guy thinks he's Edgar Casey reincarnated? Sounds like a quack to me. On his site it is claimed that he is a professional this that and the other: does he have any credentials? It's one thing to claim to be a professional researcher of ancient civilizations, it's quite another to actually know something about ancient civilizations. I mean, who should I read: this guy or someone with a PhD in the field?
Once he started making claims about transistors and teflon etc being the result of alien information i switched of...
Didymos Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 03:51 pm
@xris,
nameless wrote:
If I were truly interested in a subject, in my gathering of food for thought, I'd read everything that I can get my hands on, leave no rock unturned in my gathering data for critical examination.


Right, for critical examination - and it doesn't take but a second to realize, through critical examination, that that guy is a nut job.
0 Replies
 
Alan McDougall
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 05:24 pm
@Alan McDougall,
I can prove it to you if you like, but I am not a fraudulent thieving psychic that just wants to strip you of your precious money and then always give you a nonsense reading

I do not take money and never have, I don't talk to the dead,and all that nonsense

I don't do readings, I will come back later??
Alan McDougall
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 05:43 pm
@Alan McDougall,
Oh!! Man!! Just because you cant do it it must be a lie or frabrication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia
Synesthesia

sometimes spoken of as a "neurological condition," synesthesia is not listed in either the DSM-IV or the ICD classifications, since it does not, in general, interfere with normal daily functioning. Indeed most synesthetes report that their experiences are neutral, or even pleasant.[13] Rather, like color blindness or perfect pitch, synesthesia is a difference in perceptual experience and the term "neurological" simply reflects the brain basis of this perceptual difference. To date, no research has demonstrated a consistent association between synesthetic experience and other neurological or psychiatric conditions, although this is an active area of research (see below for associated cognitive traits).
It was once assumed that synesthetic experiences were entirely different from synesthete to synesthete, but recent research has shown that there are underlying similarities that can be observed when large numbers of synesthetes are examined together. For example, sound-color synesthetes, as a group, tend to see lighter colors for higher sounds[14] and grapheme-color synesthetes, as a group, share significant preferences for the color of each letter (e.g., A tends to be red; O tends to be white or black; S tends to be yellow etc.,[13][15][16]). Nonetheless, there are a great number of types of synesthesia, and within each type, individuals can report differing triggers for their sensations, and differing intensities of experiences. This variety means that defining synesthesia in an individual is difficult, and indeed, the majority of synesthetes are not aware that their experiences have a name.[13] However, despite the differences between individuals, there are a few common elements that define a true synesthetic experience.
Neurologist Richard Cytowic identifies the following diagnostic criteria of synesthesia:[1][2]
  1. Synesthetic images are spatially extended, meaning they often have a definite "location."
  2. Synesthesia is involuntary and automatic.
  3. Synesthetic percepts are consistent and generic (i.e. simple rather than imagistic).
  4. Synesthesia is highly memorable.
  5. Synesthesia is laden with affect.
Although Cytowic suggested that synesthetic experiences are necessarily spatially extended, more recent research has shown many cases where this is not true. For example, some synesthetes "know" the color of their letters or the taste of their words, but do not experience them as a color in space or a taste on the tongue (see below).
[edit] Experiences

Synesthetes often report that they were unaware their experiences were unusual until they realized other people did not have them, while others report feeling as if they had been keeping a secret their entire lives. The automatic and ineffable nature of a synesthetic experience means that the pairing may not seem out of the ordinary. This involuntary and consistent nature helps define synesthesia as a real experience. Most synesthetes report that their experiences are pleasant or neutral, although, in rare cases, synesthetes report that their experiences can lead to a degree of sensory overload.[13]
Though often stereotyped in the popular media as a medical condition or neurological aberration, synesthetes themselves do not experience their synesthetic perceptions as a handicap. To the contrary, most report it as a gift-an additional "hidden" sense-something they would not want to miss. Most synesthetes have become aware of their "hidden" and different way of perceiving in their childhood. Some have learned how to apply this gift in daily life and work. Synesthetes have used their gift in memorizing names and telephone numbers, mental arithmetic, but also in more complex creative activities like producing visual art, music, and theater.[17]
Despite the commonalities which permit definition of the broad phenomenon of synesthesia, individual experiences vary in numerous ways. This variability was first noticed early on in synesthesia research[18] but has only recently come to be re-appreciated by modern researchers. Some grapheme → color synesthetes report that the colors seem to be "projected" out into the world, while most report that the colors are experienced in their "mind's eye."[19] Additionally, some grapheme → color synesthetes report that they experience their colors strongly, and show perceptual enhancement on the perceptual tasks described below, while others (perhaps the majority) do not,[20] perhaps due to differences in the stage at which colors are evoked. Some synesthetes report that vowels are more strongly colored, while for others consonants are more strongly colored.[13] The descriptions below give some examples of synesthetes' experiences, but do not exhaust their rich variety.
[edit] Various forms

Synesthesia can occur between nearly any two senses or perceptual modes. Given the large number of forms of synesthesia, researchers have adopted a convention of indicating the type of synesthesia by using the following notation x → y, where x is the "inducer" or trigger experience, and y is the "concurrent" or additional experience. For example, perceiving letters and numbers (collectively called graphemes) as colored would be indicated as grapheme → color synesthesia. Similarly, when synesthetes see colors and movement as a result of hearing musical tones, it would be indicated as tone → (color, movement) synesthesia.
While nearly every logically possible combination of experiences can occur, several types are more common than others.
[edit] Grapheme → color synesthesia

Main article: Grapheme-color synesthesia


How someone with synesthesia might perceive certain letters and numbers.


Another example of real synaesthesia for letters and numbers.
In one of the most common forms of synesthesia, grapheme → color synesthesia, individual letters of the alphabet and numbers (collectively referred to as graphemes), are "shaded" or "tinged" with a color. While synesthetes do not, in general, report the same colors for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters (e.g., A is likely to be red).[13][15]
A grapheme → color synesthete reports, "I often associate letters and numbers with colors. Every digit and every letter has a color associated with it in my head. Sometimes, when letters are written boldly on a piece of paper, they will briefly appear to be that color if I'm not focusing on it. Some examples: 'S' is red, 'H' is orange, 'C' is yellow, 'J' is yellow-green, 'G' is green, 'E' is blue, 'X' is purple, 'I' is pale yellow, '2' is tan, '1' is white. If I write SHCJGEX it registers as a rainbow when I read over it, as does ABCPDEF."[21]
"'Until one day,' I said to my father, 'I realized that to make an R all I had to do was first write a P and draw a line down from its loop. And I was so surprised that I could turn a yellow letter into an orange letter just by adding a line'"
[RIGHT][RIGHT]- Patricia Lynne Duffy, recalling an earlier experience, from her book Blue Cats and Chartreuse Kittens[/RIGHT][/RIGHT]
Another reports a similar experience. "When people ask me about the sensation, they might ask, 'so when you look at a page of text, it's a rainbow of color?' It isn't exactly like that for me. When I read words, about five words around the exact one I'm reading are in color. It's also the only way I can spell. I remember in elementary school remembering how to spell the word 'priority' because the color scheme, in general, was darker than many other words. I would know that an 'e' was out of place in that word because e's were yellow and didn't fit."[21]
Another reports a slightly different experience. "When I actually look at words on a page, the letters themselves are not colored, but instead in my mind they all have a color that goes along with them, and it has always been this way. I remember back in kindergarten thinking that each homeroom had a different color associated with it. I would sometimes say things referring to that class and calling it by its color. It is also like this with days of the week, months, and so on. I thought this was caused by me over-thinking things. But I finally have come to realize that Synesthesia is real."[21]
[edit] Sound → color synesthesia

In sound → color synesthesia, individuals experience colors in response to tones or other aspects of sounds. Simon Baron-Cohen and his colleagues break this type of synesthesia into two categories, which they call "narrow band" and "broad band" sound → color synesthesia. In narrow band sound → color synesthesia (often called music → color synesthesia), musical stimuli (e.g., timbre or key) will elicit specific color experiences, such that a particular note will always elicit red, or harps will always elicit the experience of seeing a golden color. In broadband sound → color synesthesia, on the other hand, a variety of environmental sounds, like an alarm clock or a door closing, may also elicit visual experiences.
Color changes in response to different aspects of sound stimuli may involve more than just the hue of the color. Any dimension of color experience (see HSL color space) can vary. Brightness (the amount of white in a color; as brightness is removed from red, for example, it fades into a brown and finally to black), saturation (the intensity of the color; fire engine red and medium blue are highly saturated, while grays, white, and black are all unsaturated), and hue may all be affected to varying degrees.[22] Additionally, music → color synesthetes, unlike grapheme → color synesthetes, often report that the colors move, or stream into and out of their field of view.
Like grapheme → color synesthesia, there is rarely agreement amongst music → color synesthetes that a given tone will be a certain color. However, when larger samples are studied, consistent trends can be found, such that higher pitched notes are experienced as being more brightly colored.[14] The presence of similar patterns of pitch-brightness matching in non-synesthetic subjects suggests that this form of synesthesia shares mechanisms with non-synesthetes.[14]
[edit] Number form synesthesia

Main article: Number form


A number form from one of Francis Galton's subjects.[8] Note the convolutions, and how the first 12 digits correspond to a clock face.
A number form is a mental map of numbers, which automatically and involuntarily appears whenever someone who experiences number-forms thinks of numbers. Number forms were first documented and named by Francis Galton in "The Visions of Sane Persons".[23] Later research has identified them as a type of synesthesia.[9][10] In particular, it has been suggested that number-forms are a result of "cross-activation" between regions of the parietal lobe that are involved in numerical cognition and spatial cognition.[24][25] In addition to its interest as a form of synesthesia, researchers in numerical cognition have begun to explore this form of synesthesia for the insights that it may provide into the neural mechanisms of numerical-spatial associations present unconsciously in everyone.
[edit] Personification

Main article: Ordinal linguistic personification
Ordinal-linguistic personification (OLP, or personification for short) is a form of synesthesia in which ordered sequences, such as ordinal numbers, days, months and letters are associated with personalities.[6][26] Although this form of synesthesia was documented as early as the 1890s[18][27] modern research has, until recently, paid little attention to this form.[27][1][/RIGHT][/RIGHT]
For some people in addition to numbers and other ordinal sequences, objects are sometimes imbued with a sense of personality, sometimes referred to as a type of animism. This type of synesthesia is harder to distinguish from non-synesthetic associations. However, recent research has begun to show that this form of synesthesia co-varies with other forms of synesthesia, and is consistent and automatic, as required to be counted as a form of synesthesia.[6]
[edit] Lexical → gustatory synesthesia

Main article: Lexical-gustatory synesthesia
In a rare form of synesthesia, lexical → gustatory synesthesia, individual words and phonemes of spoken language evoke the sensations of taste in the mouth.
Whenever I hear, read, or articulate (inner speech) words or word sounds, I experience an immediate and involuntary taste sensation on my tongue. These very specific taste associations never change and have remained the same for as long as I can remember.
[RIGHT][RIGHT]- James Wannerton[/RIGHT][/RIGHT]
Jamie Ward and Julia Simner have extensively studied this form of synesthesia, and have found that the synesthetic associations are constrained by early food experiences.[28][29] For example, James Wannerton has no synesthetic experiences of coffee or curry, even though he consumes them regularly as an adult. Conversely, he tastes certain breakfast cereals and candies that are no longer sold.
Additionally, these early food experiences are often paired with tastes based on the phonemes in the name of the word (e.g., /I/, /n/ and /s/ trigger James Wannerton's taste of mince) although others have less obvious roots (e.g., /f/ triggers sherbet). To show that phonemes, rather than graphemes are the critical triggers of tastes, Ward and Simner showed that, for James Wannerton, the taste of egg is associated to the phoneme /k/, whether spelled with a "c" (e.g., accept), "k" (e.g., York), "ck" (e.g., chuck) or "x" (e.g., fax). Another source of tastes comes from semantic influences, so that food names tend to taste of the food they match, and the word "blue" tastes "inky."
[edit] Research history

Main article: History of synesthesia
0 Replies
 
Alan McDougall
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 05:56 pm
@Alan McDougall,
I thought everyone perceived exactly like me, and only found out later that I differed.

Some people born totally blind, have experienced sight or mind sight, in out of body and near death experiences

Of course that is not really synesthesia but interesting nevertheless.

Nameless

Quote:

Another nonsensical sentence.
Everything posted here is a topic of critical thoughtful examination and conversation. Need I remind you of where you are?
And "this type of phenomenon" is common amongst entheogenic practitioners who would readily recognize your; "of the intensity of colors, that blazed in living harmonious vibrations. Everything sang and I could hear and fell the caress of the sound of smell the taste of music and colors beyond present perception."
As a reminder, though, you actually did offer it for discussion by mentioning it here;
:warn:

Tone down you insults I am not some egotistical moron , you are the one coming across as an all knowing egotist.

One more insult from you and I will leave the forum.

I did not join the forum to trade insults but to teach and to share and to learn
xris
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Jan, 2009 04:25 am
@Alan McDougall,
Alan McDougall wrote:
I can prove it to you if you like, but I am not a fraudulent thieving psychic that just wants to strip you of your precious money and then always give you a nonsense reading

I do not take money and never have, I don't talk to the dead,and all that nonsense

I don't do readings, I will come back later??
Sorry i was refering to the video clip not you..not paying attention..sorry.
0 Replies
 
Alan McDougall
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Jan, 2009 11:34 am
@Alan McDougall,
xris

Thank you

Alan
0 Replies
 
nameless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Jan, 2009 04:34 pm
@Alan McDougall,
Alan McDougall;41584 wrote:
Tone down you insults I am not some egotistical moron ,

I never said 'moron'.

Quote:
you are the one coming across as an all knowing egotist

All in the mind of the beholder.

Quote:
One more insult from you and I will leave the forum.

Whatever...
I say as I must (I thought it honest and respectful), and, if you don't like it, you do as you must. OK?

Quote:
I did not join the forum to trade insults but to teach and to share and to learn

I intended no insult. I offered an observation, that you didn't 'like'.
Perhaps you are having a 'delicate moment', and see any simple 'challenging observation' as an 'insult'.
'Insults', hon, are in the eye of the ('weakened' egoic state of the) beholder.
I have no personal problem with you, I don't know a 'personal' you; why would I possibly intend to insult you? Really!
0 Replies
 
Alan McDougall
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Jan, 2009 06:09 pm
@Alan McDougall,
nameless,

Think before you make a "Challenging observation".

A better more polite way of disagreeing could be phrased : "I don't follow your reasoning it is ambiguous to me."

You statements like , "that is another nonsensical statement is impolite"

I do not post nonsense and if you get to know me better you will see just that.

We are not here to show how clever we are!
0 Replies
 
Kolbe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Jan, 2009 09:24 pm
@Alan McDougall,
If anything we could be here to show that others aren't as clever as they think.

And I apologise Alan, though you seem polite I can liken your experience on the first page to standing up too fast getting out of the bath, feeling dizzy and seeing purple.
0 Replies
 
Alan McDougall
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 03:43 pm
@Alan McDougall,
Kolbe,

No I was not directing that post to you but nameless. But my point is many people believe Timbuktu is a mythical city, but I live in Africa and know it is a real city in a African country

You are welcome to think it is a whole lot of Junk , but just because you think it is untrue does not alter that fact about it being true or not being true.

Like the quantum kittens it might be true and it might not

Let me think how I can open your mind to these possibilities
0 Replies
 
 

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