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Why Humans Reject God

 
 
walkingaround
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 02:25 pm
@tMeeker,
why humans reject god?
I would like to answer that question, and at the same time this is my first post in this forum, so it is as well a kind of introduction.

First of all, I want to say that i do not REJECT God, I but just do not believe that he exists.
1. I was raised in a secular household, so I never was educated to believe in God.

2. On a pure level of ARGUMENTS, I follow the problem of Evil, (see threads), meaning: a personal, omnipotent, benvolent god cannot exist. (But, an omnipotent MALevolent god could...) So I am an atheist, which mens to me rejecting the monotheistic gods, not nessecarily the pantheistics or the deistics. I am not a hardcore materialist.

3. THe believe in god itself as christians describe it, is rather of psychological interest to me. Meaning: I find it more interesting to think about why somebody would believe in God, than thinking about if that believe (which is one of many, after all), would be the right one for me.

4. The moment I realized CONCIOUSLY that I am not religious, was actually something like a revelation to me: A moment of relief, feelings of insight. I just feel so relieved that I do not need anything than the world itself to be complete.

5. I never got clear with this question about christianity et al: If you believe in god, you start of with a dogma: (or axiom): that is that god exists (in a certain way). I just do find dogmas very cumbersome, because the limit our thinking and experience in a non-nessecary way, I think.

6. A christian has a God as its center or heart, (etc). I have the world. What else would I have? A jewish rabbi told me, that when he looks at his inner core, he sees god. I see the world. God is something else than the world (even if you just say he is more) . In my center there is nothing else than the world. This is, what i would call secular spirituallity (awful word!!!!)
best
0 Replies
 
prothero
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 02:30 pm
@tMeeker,
It does not take long to accept or reject particular conceptions of "god" and of divine attributes or divine action in the world (revealed relgion or supernatural intervention, say).
It is quite a task to reject all the possible conceptions of the divine, the holy, the numinous or the sacred in the world.
We reject particular notions about god, what men say about god.
walkingaround
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 03:34 pm
@prothero,
prothero;165428 wrote:

It is quite a task to reject all the possible conceptions of the divine, the holy, the numinous or the sacred in the world.
We reject particular notions about god, what men say about god.


I would never say that my rejection of a christian god is "quite a task", just the opposite, I would say its very simple. Although to some christians it might seem "quite a task".

Who exactly do you mean with "we"?


I would say that it is quite a task to reject all the possible conceptions of the divine, and that it would also be quite a task to accept all of them (without being irrelevant). Maybe it is not about rejection anyway? But about inquiring?

Am I right that a materialist would reject all the possible conceptions of the divine? So they are people who do not belong to your "we"-group.

I assume you want to say that god is "beyond language". If he is, it wouldnt make any sense to reject him, anyway. You couldnt talk about him, you could just experience him, or not. And then maybe paint a picture or write a poem. But that would not be a language of arguments anymore....
prothero
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 08:22 pm
@walkingaround,
walkingaround;165445 wrote:
I would never say that my rejection of a christian god is "quite a task", just the opposite, I would say its very simple. Although to some christians it might seem "quite a task".

Who exactly do you mean with "we"?

I would say that it is quite a task to reject all the possible conceptions of the divine, and that it would also be quite a task to accept all of them (without being irrelevant). Maybe it is not about rejection anyway? But about inquiring?

Am I right that a materialist would reject all the possible conceptions of the divine? So they are people who do not belong to your "we"-group.

I assume you want to say that god is "beyond language". If he is, it wouldnt make any sense to reject him, anyway. You couldnt talk about him, you could just experience him, or not. And then maybe paint a picture or write a poem. But that would not be a language of arguments anymore....
Before someone says they "reject God"
one must ask
"what do you mean by "god""?
For what one means by "god" is the pressing question for 21st century theology. Faith I think is pretty much an individual matter so forgive the use of "we".
walkingaround
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 08:26 pm
@prothero,
the use of we just implied some group (were i would obviously not belong to) : rethoric tricks,......
Yes, I think it is a very individual matter, I agree with you....
But how can WE form groups or communities, if we are just a bunch of individualists??? thats my problem, actually, .... :-)

---------- Post added 05-17-2010 at 10:27 PM ----------

I think I need a WE.
0 Replies
 
windy34
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2011 10:55 am
@tMeeker,
I think the reason humans reject God is because if there is a God he doesn't transcend to make people feel better in bad and lonely situations. Regardless of whether or not there is a God life will always be the same on earth with people not having their needs met.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2011 12:31 pm
Before answering this question we must consider what version or type of ver sion of the God concept we are referring to. All versions of God are human constructions. God did not make Man; Man made God. Therefore, given our cultural and historical variability we must expect both acceptance and rejection of the various versions of God. I reject the cartoon notions of a grand Ego creator, but I cannot reject a notion of Ultimate Reality. Indeed, I cannot live with the former and I cannot do very well without the latter.
windy34
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2011 01:37 pm
@JLNobody,
Is it also possible that God made man, and man made his own idea of God? Man's idea of God might not be the correct idea of God.
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2011 06:32 pm
@windy34,
Logically valid but not conceivably true.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2011 06:32 pm
@windy34,
Logically valid but not conceivably true.
0 Replies
 
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2011 07:10 pm
Like a dog wilfully pissing words upon the tree of life and smiling bravery┬┤s behind the dusk of death the philosopher bashes clockworks of sand and junks the silence of rocks and Gods in vain...
0 Replies
 
north
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Oct, 2011 10:29 pm
@tMeeker,
tMeeker wrote:

Pride. Welcome to the core fundamental, founding purpose, principle, catalyst, and intiator as to why humans reject an ultimate creator. This constant is thoroughly seen in so many humans now withinin our society, and it is ever more seen within humans of a higher standard of educational and intellectual status.


Quote:
Why do humans reject God? The answer is simple, they believe they do not need God, they fully believe they are above God, and that they are "just fine making it on their own".


wrong

its not about about " being above god " as it is growing up , maturing

there is a difference between asking for help if needed

and the atittude to always be their whether you like it or not , by god

Humanity can grow , but god gets in the way





0 Replies
 
 

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