5
   

Why does co2 become liquid oxygen, when you cool it with liquid nitrogen, or any other cool substanc

 
 
Mibro
 
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 05:16 am
Hello there.

I saw this experiment, where a guy blew air into a balloon, wich of course is CO2, and then poured over liquid nitrogen. What was left was this very condensed liquid, and of course very cold, called "liquid oxygen"

But i've also heard that when CO2 changes from gas to liquid to solid, it becomes Dry Ice.

So how come CO2 or exhalation air becomes LOx when cooled down?
 
contrex
 
  4  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 06:32 am
Quote:
a guy blew air into a balloon, wich of course is CO2


No "of course" about it. Air is a mixture. Inhaled air is 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 1% inert gas such as argon. Exhaled air has 78% nitrogen, 17% oxygen, 4% CO2, 1% inert gas such as argon.

Quote:
So how come CO2 or exhalation air becomes LOx when cooled down?


It doesn't.
0 Replies
 
Mibro
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 06:43 am
Thanks for the answer Smile

But is there is still more oxygen than co2, how come a flame will stop burning? Oxygen aids the combustion, right?
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 06:59 am
@Mibro,
Combustion stops when CO2 is more than 10%
Mibro
 
  0  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 07:07 am
@contrex,
Ahh, ok, thanks for the answer!
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 08:02 am
@Mibro,
Blow air on hot coals and watch the coal glow brighter, up to that point where the air stream begins to cool the coal.

Heat oxygen and fuel are all required simultaneously. remove one the heat by blowing cool air on the surface of a hot coal and the combustion decreases.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 08:02 am
@Mibro,
The air in the ballon is mostly nitrogen with some O2 and some CO2 added in as mentioned above. The liquid nitrogen being poured on the ballon is vaporizing at around 75 deg K. If you look at a phase diagram for O2, you see that you can get liquid O2 at that temperature, so it is feasible that you are seeing some liquid O2 coming from the ballon. The phase diagram for CO2 shows that at that temperature and pressure, it will go straight to a solid, so it might be fun to cut open the ballon to see the dry ice.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 11:44 am
I thought elements have three states, based on its temperature. Solid, liquid and gas. With less molecular movement (colder), the element eventually reaches its solid state; as the element heats up (more molecular movement) it first becomes a liquid, and eventually becomes a gas. Like water (works for inorganic compounds). Water is ice at its coldest, then water, and finally steam at its hottest state.

If I am wrong, I guess I did not learn my high school chemistry correctly?
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 11:46 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

I thought inorganic compounds have three states, based on its temperature. Solid, liquid and gas. With less molecular movement (colder), the compound eventually reaches its solid state; as the compound heats up (more molecular movement) it first becomes a liquid, and eventually becomes a gas. Like water. Water is ice at its coldest, then water, and finally steam at its hottest state.

If I am wrong, blame my high school chemistry that I thought I learned?


4 states - Plasma is the hottest. And there may be more states as well!

Cycloptichorn
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 11:49 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

Foofie wrote:

I thought inorganic compounds have three states, based on its temperature. Solid, liquid and gas. With less molecular movement (colder), the compound eventually reaches its solid state; as the compound heats up (more molecular movement) it first becomes a liquid, and eventually becomes a gas. Like water. Water is ice at its coldest, then water, and finally steam at its hottest state.

If I am wrong, blame my high school chemistry that I thought I learned?


4 states - Plasma is the hottest. And there may be more states as well!

Cycloptichorn


I never learned about plasma. When I went to school we were not even on the moon yet.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 11:49 am
Why does it say Lox in the tags at the top of the page? Is there an offer for smoked Nova Scotia salmon embedded in this thread? How do i get mine?

This thread raises more quesitons than it answers.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:14 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Why does it say Lox in the tags at the top of the page? Is there an offer for smoked Nova Scotia salmon embedded in this thread? How do i get mine?

This thread raises more quesitons than it answers.


I thought Lox is Liquid oxygen? However, if it is the lox put on bagels then it would also need cream cheese. Philadelphia brand to be authentically "bagels, cream cheese and lox." And any coffee should be Maxwell House.

I will trade one bagel with cream cheese and lox for a plate of corn beef and cabbage. (Virtually of course in cyberspace.)
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:26 pm
@Foofie,
Quote:
I thought Lox is Liquid oxygen?


LOX, LOx or less frequently, Lox are abbreviations for liquid oxygen; lox with a small 'l' is a regional name (USA East Coast, and Canada mainly) for what the rest of the English speaking world calls "smoked salmon". The word lox is a Yiddish word for “salmon".
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:27 pm
@Foofie,
It's slightly more complicated than that. Depending on the pressure, you don't have to go through the liquid state to go between gas and solid. Here is the phase diagram for water. At one atmosphere, you transition from solid to liquid to gas as you raise the temperature.
http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/ice/h2ophase.gif
But if you look at the CO2 plot I posted above, you see how the line at one atmosphere goes from solid directly to gas. That is what happens with dry ice.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:54 pm
Gentlemen, responding to Foofie on an assumption that he has a normal understanding, is well educated or possesses a subtle sense of humor (or even a gross one) is always a mistake.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 01:54 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
But if you look at the CO2 plot I posted above, you see how the line at one atmosphere goes from solid directly to gas. That is what happens with dry ice.


This change from solid directly to liquid is called "sublimation".
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 01:57 pm
Contrex wrote:
This change from solid directly to liquid is called "sublimation".

Surely you made a typo, Contrex! Twisted Evil
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 02:41 pm
Francis wrote:
Surely you made a typo, Contrex!


yes... blame it on a very nice Sancerre. Of course I meant "from solid directly to vapour"
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 09:39 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

Quote:
I thought Lox is Liquid oxygen?


LOX, LOx or less frequently, Lox are abbreviations for liquid oxygen; lox with a small 'l' is a regional name (USA East Coast, and Canada mainly) for what the rest of the English speaking world calls "smoked salmon". The word lox is a Yiddish word for “salmon".



Ud. vive en Espana y sepa acerca de las comidas de los Judios? Increible!
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jan, 2010 09:40 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Gentlemen, responding to Foofie on an assumption that he has a normal understanding, is well educated or possesses a subtle sense of humor (or even a gross one) is always a mistake.


Did you forget to include a high IQ?
0 Replies
 
 

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