16
   

DAMN THOSE AUSTRIANS ! ! !

 
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:00 pm
Quote:
This is insult deserving of real ire, why are you so understanding about the creation of this god awful caricature? Is this just weary acceptance?

Speaking for myself all i heard was (another) stupid American. I know not all americans are stupid lke that so it just made me chuckle.
Some people use a "put down" to make themselves feel good. The clip works in almost the same way.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:04 pm
I just wondered if its because racial sterotyping does not play (a big part or as big a part as it does for americans) in Australian culture.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:08 pm
@dadpad,
Weird, this is way worse American stupidity to me than the recent stuff that didn't just elicit a chuckle and it's been going on for about my entire life!
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:11 pm
You calling Australians werid now bub!

c. (Thats as close as i can come to the sarcasm icon)
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:15 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

dadpad wrote:
what is supposed to be annoying? that Americans (as represented in that clip) are stupid?


The incessant reduction of Australia to the "G'day" and "shrimp on the barbie" references. I find it annoying as a non-Australian. I wonder how any Australian makes it through a trip to America without punching someone in the nose for it.



It got VERY wearying, but the people who do it are being as nice as they know how, so it didn't make me feel angry....I guess it IS just weary acceptance.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:17 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

Weird, this is way worse American stupidity to me than the recent stuff that didn't just elicit a chuckle and it's been going on for about my entire life!



Because I don't think being whatever the hell is the description of the whole Hogan etc. image thing is as bad as being thought of as racist.

Anyway, it was an Australian agency that made that ad to lure in Americans, so it's by no means just the US's fault.

That goddam film (which led to the ad) came out in 1986...so it's been for a significant part of your life.

I wonder if we even rated a stereotype in the US before that?
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:23 pm
@dlowan,
The ads came first, but what is with that guy's ability to start a meme? The "that's not a knife" meme is another enduring one.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:41 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Good grief...you're right...re the ads being first.

Well, I guess he fitted in with how USians saw Australians anyway (if they did).

Hogan was a great comedian, pre-Hollywood...and I think the film and the ad were cleverly crafted to appeal to their target audience, and they did.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:44 pm
anyhow* is another meme or catchphrase he created. It came from a ciggarette commercial waaaay back.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:45 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:
I wonder if we even rated a stereotype in the US before that?


Yeah, but before it was the whole Waltzing Matilda, tough guys on the sheep station, The Sundowners stereotype (if you're familiar with that film, which was made in about 1960). There had arisen, though, in the 1980s a stereotype based on Mad Max (which initially became a cult classic on late night movie programs, having largely flopped in the theaters). The whole Hogan thing was an attempt to exploit the sudden new popularity of things Australian, although i doubt that he became more popular than Gibson and the Mad Max franchise. It was responsible, though for a flourishing of the Australian indy film industry, which got attention they might not have gotten had Mad Max not been so popular world wide. It did well in theaters outside the U.S., and when it became popular on late night teevee, American film release companies hurried to put it in the theaters, but it wasn't successful, because so many people had already seen it on teevee, or had bought the video. Road Warrior and Beyond Thunderdome did well on the big screen in the U.S., though--so much so that some idiot decided it would be a good idea to cast Mel Gibson as Fletcher Christian. As Mencken observed, no one ever went broke underestimating the taste of the American public.

The success of Mad Max made it possible for films like Breaker Morant to get serious attention abroad. Unfortunately, though, although Mad Max was a more successful franchise product (i've heard they're making another one), the Paul Hogan thing became the basis for the current shallow American stereotype--which i'm sure you know is not held by all Americans, just the one's who consider television a source of serious culture.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:48 pm
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:

anyhow* is another meme or catchphrase he created. It came from a ciggarette commercial waaaay back.


Same ad agency.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:50 pm
@Setanta,
auzzie music popped up in top 40 thereabouts as well...

men at work.

flock of seagulls.

the budgie...
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:51 pm
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:
anyhow* is another meme or catchphrase he created. It came from a ciggarette commercial waaaay back.


The "Anyhow, have a Winfield" ones right? I hadn't known that that was the genesis of the "anyhow" popularity.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:54 pm
@Rockhead,
Maybe someone was aggressively marketing Australian pop culture about then. When "grunge" became popular, i actually had idiots telling me that the Pacific Northwest was a source for unprecedented musical innovation, because they didn't realize that industrial rock was all over the country, but that the A & R and promo guys had descended on Seattle. I think a little of the same thing happened with Australian singers, actors, movies, groups, etc. in the 80s. It would be interesting to know if that was the product of a successful promotional campaign.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 10:04 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I have a dim memory of some US sitcom with "anyhow" as a catchphrase...but I might be dreaming.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 10:07 pm
@Setanta,
There was a cultural "thing" happening...a renaissance of the Oz film industry, (strongly featuring the South Australian Film Commission....South Australia had benefited from a lot of arts spending and leadership by then Premier, Don Dunstan) which had been very strong in the early days, and we were attacking the international market quite deliberately.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 10:16 pm
@dlowan,
Well, i'm glad to think it was successful. Do you think Men at Work, Midnight Oil, Olivia Clueless John and such musical phenoms benefited from that as well? Unfortunately, it seems the Hogan character emerged as the new stereotype. I suspect that was because he had broader appeal. Crocodile Dundee had a love story in it, too, and little old ladies and middle aged manly men could identify with the Paul Hogan character, whereas Mad Max was all weird and post apocalyptic.

I enjoyed a lot of the fil-ums, and some of the music.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 10:37 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:

... however, I am very, very impressed that edgar even knows of the existence of the AGE newspaper! (really! Many wouldn't.)

I would have thought it was completely unknown ... outside of Austria.


I was very careful to post the picture of them taken from behind. There is another pic of them from the front. See how considerate I am?
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 10:46 pm
@edgarblythe,
ummm.

thanks ed?


(grrrr.)
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 11:07 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Well, i'm glad to think it was successful. Do you think Men at Work, Midnight Oil, Olivia Clueless John and such musical phenoms benefited from that as well? Unfortunately, it seems the Hogan character emerged as the new stereotype. I suspect that was because he had broader appeal. Crocodile Dundee had a love story in it, too, and little old ladies and middle aged manly men could identify with the Paul Hogan character, whereas Mad Max was all weird and post apocalyptic.

I enjoyed a lot of the fil-ums, and some of the music.


I think they benefited from the whole shebang, and earlier musical breakthroughs,...from people like (wait for it!) The Seekers.

We just got more confident and prepared to take our stuff out there.

There was a lot of classical stuff, like opera and theatre and dance, being taken out there, too. Heck, our little local dance company was internationally renowned, until the Arts Minister took a snit a few years back, and didn't renew the director's contract!!!

I think Hoges emerged as the new stereotype in the US, mainly (at which it was aimed) ...I don't know that it's as important elsewhere...it's not come up so much, anyway.

The Brits got a lot more of our stuff, and they have a whole range of stereotypes!

Most of the rest of the west isn't as insular as the US, I don't think, so I think there is more stuff for them to pick from, when working out national stereotypes.
0 Replies
 
 

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