21
   

What's with this delivery charge nonsense?

 
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 08:21 pm
I'd bet Australians were right up there with the bad tippers.

We always warn visiting Americans not to stuff it up and tip madly. Tipping is not the norm here. Wait staff are paid a proper wage. Tipping is for exceptional service, and would almost never be more than 10% I'm staggered that anyone would think 20% is acceptable / required.

We can never get the hang of having to tip these people to do their job - that's what they get paid to do?! It almost seems a kind of begging.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 08:27 pm
@margo,
the wait staff where I worked made $2.50 an hour, plus tips...
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 08:28 pm
@Rockhead,
Rockhead wrote:

the wait staff where I worked made $2.50 an hour, plus tips...


Why not pay a decent wage and cut out the begging aspect?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 08:28 pm
@margo,
I know what you mean. Still, it does give us customers a little say in what we are going to put up with. I often eat breakfast in the same restaurant, and you can tell who is working which section just by where all the people are sitting.

Vote with your feet, I guess. Better than any opinion poll.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 09:11 pm
What's a proper wage? What's the going rate for waiters? Tipping does encourage good service.

If I am going to make the same money even if I just go through the motions, what's going to make me do more?
Why should I pay attention to your avacado allergy if my hourly wage is going to be paid anyway?
Am I going to make sure your steak is medium rare and not medium?
Am I going to go look for that last bottle of Forefront 2007 if there isn't anything extra in it for me? Nah. Have a good night.
meh.
====
What kills me is when I go to dinner with people who have weirdly complex methods of tipping. They will do ANYTHING to avoid tipping 20% (which is normal now for good, efficient, friendly service).

They will insist on doubling the tax (8.25%) even if the waitress hit the mark all the way through dinner. ay yi. The difference on $170.00 tab between 20 and 16.5 percent is six bucks. (or, as I told someone once, two Grande Lattes.)

My favorite cheapskate, of late, is the one who decided that he only tips a dollar per drink, even those which come during dinner. So the check comes and he wants to go through this whole mathematic enterprise of reducing the total by the amount of wine and liquor, refiguring the tip based on the food amount (not including the tax Rolling Eyes ) and then adding in the buck a glass amount. What we do is separate his dinner and two glasses of wine. The rest of us act like adults.

The bottom line is if the service is good, tip.
If the service is exceptional, tip really well.
If you want to grouse and scrimp about the tip, stay home. You are ruining the experience for the rest of us.

Joe(AND it's really hard for me to do math after a Manhattan and two glasses of Cabernet.)Nation
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 10:30 pm
My sister has a method similar to your friend's, except she will figure it is 20% plus roughly $2 a visit to the table (if there are 2 of them, $3 if there are 3 of them, etc) , so if they came with menus, came back with water, came back to get your order, came back with a drink, came back with your food, came back to see how everything was/do you need a refill, came back once again, and then came back with your dessert/the bill... they're making a basic tip amount of $16... Then she calculates the % of the tip (20%) and adds/subtracts from her formula based on performance. So, the basic 20% plus or minus. Sounds like a lot of work to me but it works for her.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 10:41 pm
who do you tip?
wait staff obviously... but who else? The plumber when he fixed your leaky tap? The chick on the supermarket checkout? The kid who puts icecream in your cone at the beachside Wendys?

I have heard stories of Australians on holiday, who, because its just not just not part of the psyc forget to even think about it. If i forget and get a dirty look, is an apology and explanation acceptable. (i'm from australia and tipping is not something we are used to doing)

Who is expected to tip: A 10 year old buying an icecream? A highschool kid in the coffee shop? a broke college girl?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 11:10 pm
@dadpad,
I personally think that in the United States, it's gotten entirely out of hand. Years and years ago (30 years ago at least), i used to make tip jar signs for my bartenders, because they had to put up with drunks, and frat boys and other obnoxious wild animals, and i thought they deserved, especially as the owner paid them as little as he could get away with.

But these days, they have tip jars in in the damned coffee shops, in the ice cream store. For chrissake, clown, all you did was pour a cup of coffee (overpriced coffee at that) into a paper cup and hand it to me. You expect me to fork over a dollar for that ? ! ? ! ? I don't tip those clowns, and if they want to glare, i've got a duzy of a glare to shoot right back at 'em.

Once upon a time, one knew who to tip (or would be instructed in it by one's elders), and how much. For example, it was once tradition that one tipped cabbies 5% to 10%, depending on how long the trip took, because they get a percentage of the meter. These days, especially in cities, they'll bad mouth you if they think you didn't tip them enough, and meter be damned. The only people for whom i feel any sympathy (in the U.S., i'm saying, of course) are waiters and waitresses in diner type places, because they usually don't get much in tips, are paid an appallingly low wage (a special low wage, less than minimum wage) and often get stiffed. Waiters and waitresses in white tablecloth restaurants don't have that much of my sympathy, because they get tipped on much bigger tickets, and are much less likely to get stiffed. As has been pointed out, they are also likely to get a gratuity added to the check on large parties.

I tip people where it is to my advantage. I tip my haircut lady, because she does a damned good job (which ain't common, because i've got curly hair), and because she's a sweetie pie, and finally because i want to encourage her to do a good job next time. I'll tip delivery drivers well, too, if i know i'm likely to have them back again. I used to live near the Ohio State University, and there was a pizza place on the High Street, Baby Face Pizza, who had one of those unfortunate products--get it fresh and hot and it was great; get it cold and it sucked the big one. Well, i tipped the guy well the first time, and the next time i called, he was the guy who answered the phone. He was there in fifteen minutes, and the pie was so hot i had to let it cool off before i could eat. The word got around, and i never had to wait more than 15 minutes for a pie, and it was hot and good when i got it. My friends were amazed at the service i got, but i pointed out to them that i was paying for the service with my tips. (I suspect they didn't get much out of the student ghetto customers they usually served, and especially frat boys who are notoriously cheap.)

There was a Chinese place that i used to go to for carry out, when i moved to Hilliard, Ohio a few years later. I was in there in the afternoon a couple of times, and saw them making up everything fresh. The whole family worked like dogs doing their prep and set-up for the evening. You don't get dumplings and egg rolls freshly made at most places, so i was impressed. I started leaving tips, and at first they were nonplussed. So one evening when i stopped in on my way home (i had called before i left work), i explained tip jars to them. They seemed a little uncertain, but i got them to put a jar by the cash register. Americans understand that. Later on, i made a nice little sign for their tip jar. It was a watercolor wash showing Chinese-style red tile roofs mounting a wooded hillside, and underneath i did a nice caligraphy of: "Tipping is not a city in China." Within a few weeks, when i walked through the door, they would actually smile at me--at me, a round-eye. I'd order a stir fry and the guy would reach under the counter and get out a clean wok, and he'd fry up so much food the carry-out package was bulging. I'd order fried dumplings, which was supposed to be six for $4.00, and they'd give eight or nine. It was worth every penny i'd spent in tips, because they would really take care of me. Sometimes i'd call to order something and the lady (who i thought of as Mama-San) would tell, "No good, not fresh you want such and such." I'd go along with that. Definitely a case of you get what you pay for. A friend of mine who came over frequently to play video games had often worked as a delivery driver in the past, and he fully approved and understood, and they quickly started treating him like royalty too.

As for DP's question, in the States, you want to tip 15% in most restaurants, unless you really think they took care of you, in which case i'd advise 20%. In diners, where the ladies get run off their feet, i'd give 'em 20% or 25%. Cab drivers can have 10%, and screw 'em if they don't like it. If they complain, ignore 'em and walk away.

Other places, other customs. I don't know if it's still true, but when i was in Ireland in the 1970s, they'd be insulted if you tried to tip 'em. (A legacy, i suspect, of the tender mercies of the Anglo-Irish Horse Aristocracy.) The only people you tipped were cab drivers, and you customarily gave them 50p.

In Canada, waiters and waitresses actually get paid a decent amount in most places, so 15% ought to be sufficient. Elsewhere in the world, i really couldn't say.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 05:52 am
@Mame,
Mame wrote:
Well see, the ad says "Free Delivery within X km", so I was surprised at the delivery charge.

Hmmmm ... With that information added, it sounds suspiciously like private cream skimming on the delivery person's part. Just for the fun of it, did you check with the telephone operator at the pizza place?

In my little town, most takeout places charge a delivery fee for small orders -- typically for orders of less than $15. And they're up front about it in the takeout menus they hang on my doorknob.
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 09:30 am
Practically every restaurant that delivers around here charges a delivery fee. I'm amazed that people are amazed at this practice.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 10:38 am
@Thomas,
It was the guy on the phone who told me that, and I've never heard of it before. I used to deliver pizzas when I was in college and there was no delivery fee. We order take out from time to time and always order from the local restaurants - this was my first experience with it. I could see if it was $3, but $8 on a $35 order? That's just under 25%.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 05:21 pm
Set's experience with tipping is the same as mine. Funny thing. My Blackened Cheeseburger is always done right, my pizza (whether from Domino's or from their, not as good but authentic Italian rivals up on 181St Street) comes hot hot and (this is critical) my order from Fresh Direct comes right at the top of the delivery window and I haven't had as much as a cracked egg in any order in five years.
It's a little grease that's all. Pay it and your world gets a little better, mebbe. Doesn't get better? Hey. Find somebody else to tip.

==
Um. I spill my change into the tip jar at Starbucks or at my bagel place because when I come in they say "Hey!", they ask if I want my usual and they have it ready before I can say ''yes,please."

I've said this before, people want two things in New York City : to be completely anonymous AND for everyone in the local joints to know who they are.

Joe(such a small thing.)Nation
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 05:28 pm
@Joe Nation,
I've said this before, people want two things in New York City : to be completely anonymous AND for everyone in the local joints to know who they are.

Now there's a good summary..
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 09/28/2022 at 04:57:20