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I Need Help ASAP! How Does The Slow Movement Of Crustal Plates Change The Earths Surface?

 
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:38 pm
I'm a seventh grade teacher who loves plate tectonics!

So, we have the first type of mountain building which happens at a convergent boundary - where two continental plates collide. Good job on that one!

Next you have mountains built by volcanoes - where do those happen?
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:41 pm
heres some stuff that might be usefull but you have to decide how to write it up. and dont forget to credit the posters here, this web site and the reference sites.

According to the theory of plate tectonics, the crust is divided into a number of large and small plates that float on and travel independently of the mantle. Plate motions are responsible for continental drift and seafloor spreading and for most volcanic and seismic activity on Earth.
http://www.answers.com/topic/earth

Some geological processes, such as those that make mountains or wear them down, typically take place at imperceptible rates. Sudden events, however, can change the landscape in a minute (for example a single earthquake can create a 3-meter-high fault scarp, alter stream courses, and drop the valley floor 1 meter).
http://geology.utah.gov/teacher/tc/tcnov94.htm

The surface of Earth is constantly changing, as the continents slowly drift about on the turbulent foundation of partially molten rock beneath them. Collisions between landmasses build mountains; erosion wears them down. Slow changes in the climate cause equally slow changes in the vegetation and animals inhabiting a place.

Read more: Earth - Physical Parameters Of Earth, The Formation Of Earth, Beyond The Atmosphere, Life - Earth's surface, Earth's atmosphere and weather
The lands of our planet are in a constant, though slow, state of change. Landmasses move, collide, and break apart according to a process called plate tectonics. The lithosphere is not one huge shell of rock; it is composed of several large pieces called plates. These pieces are constantly in motion, because Earth's interior is dynamic, with its core still molten and with large-scale convective currents in the upper mantle. The giant furnace beneath all of us moves our land no more than a few centimeters a year, but this is enough to have profound consequences.
Where a crustal plate rides over another one, burying and melting it in the hot regions below the lithosphere, volcanoes rise, dramatically illustrated by Mt. St. Helens in Washington and the other sleeping giants that loom near Seattle and Portland. Where lands lie wide and arid, they are sculpted into long, scalloped cliffs, as one sees in the deserts of New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. Without ever being aware of it, we humans spend our lives on the ultimate roller coaster.
http://science.jrank.org/pages/2214/Earth.html

Look up the meaning of the the words Mantle, lithosphere, crust and include definitions for these words in your assigment.

perhaps you could include a cutaway pic of the earth showing the variouse layers of the earth.


0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  3  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:51 pm
How does a paragraph like this sound?

-- Topic Sentence (one sentence)
------define plate tectonics (PT) (one sentence)
---------explain PT (1-2 sentences)
------mountains build where continental plates converge (one sentence)
---------explain the process of convergence (1-2 sentences)
------mountains cane be formed by volcanism (one sentence)
---------explain the process of volcanism (1-2 sentences)
-- concluding sentence (one sentence)
husker
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:53 pm
@littlek,
you rock Ms K
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:55 pm
Thanks for askin this question shana. I'm really learning some stuff i didnt know. I found all this info by using search terms in google such as plate tectonics theory

Plate tectonic activity takes place at four types of boundaries: What are these boundaries called? you can find the answer at this site
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/tryit/tectonics/intro.html

There is a shockwave game here that lets you move the continental plates
but i dont have shockwave installed. Maybe you could suggest to your teacher that the class could play the game.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/tryit/tectonics/
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:55 pm
@husker,
Very punny, Husker.
husker
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:57 pm
@littlek,
not so stone cold as you tink!!

another good link
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plate_tectonics
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:57 pm
@husker,
husker wrote:

you rock Ms K


Not so sure about that husker

Quote:
I bet you think I'm joking about loving PT. I'm not. I talk about it in bars with my friends



littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:58 pm
@dadpad,
Just what are you trying to say, DP?
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:59 pm
Imagine the conversation when Farmerman and littlek get together in a bar. my eyes are glazing over just thinking about it.
husker
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:00 pm
@dadpad,
I happen to be a rock n geology guy too
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:00 pm
@dadpad,
Farmerman knows so much more than I do that he'd make my eyes glaze over - even if I did try to keep up.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:51 pm
@husker,
I think i may be outnumbered here.

*makes stratgic withdrawl*
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:52 pm
@dadpad,
Meanwhile I fear we've scared Shan6 away.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2010 01:52 pm
@littlek,
Hmmm....
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2010 02:09 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

I bet you think I'm joking about loving PT. I'm not. I talk about it in bars with my friends when and have to stop when their eyes start to glaze over.

DP's right - you start, we'll guide.


I believe you. I had an accounting instructor say that when the students eyeballs roll up inside the head it is time to write something on the board. Maybe in your case, it does mean it's time for a new subject.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2010 02:23 pm
@roger,
<grin>
0 Replies
 
mm25075
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Jan, 2010 10:30 am
Bill Nye the Science Guy had a way that made me laugh to remember this concept.

He took two cookies and placed one sort of over the other, then pushed them down. He repeated over and over again "Subduction!" Hehe. Now whenever I think about earth movement I think about cookies!
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Jan, 2010 10:39 am
@Shan6,
Think of a thick rug and push together on opposite sides (You will need another person to help on this demonstration) you will se how it buckles in the middle, Those are mountins. Now take 2 carpets (Use non hooked rugs that have stiffer backing)
1SLide each rug aside of and into each other. This shows transcurrent

3Push one rug on top of the other while using a stiff and a thin rug (one will represent relatively thin continental crust and the other will represent thicker marine crust).

Go look at various mountain ranges, especially the Himalayas and see if you cant tell how the compression occured.

Using simple household stuff can help you understand all the different ways crustal plates can move with respect to each other

Look at all the locations of mountains AND volcanoes and earthquake centers (as mapped by the guys who map earthquakes, the USGS)
0 Replies
 
mChafford
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Apr, 2012 07:22 am
@Shan6,
Some good basic dounloads at:

http://www.bgs.ac.uk/downloads/search.cfm?SECTION_ID=0&MIME_TYPE=0&SEARCH_TXT=Plate+Tectonics&dlBtn=go
 

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