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dog ear infections

 
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 06:50 pm
while visiting a vacation spot our dogs began shaking their heads. once at home the shaking stop on the second visit the shaking resumed and now one dog has a bad ear infection (not ear mites). any ideas or suggestions on how this can be prevented.
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 06:57 pm
Did they swim?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 07:02 pm
@littlek,
Yeah if they did go for a swim, you probably could flush out their ears with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water the next time you take them for a swim. Should check with a vet to see if what proper mixture or alternative liquid you could use postswim time to prevent further infections.
0 Replies
 
labmix26
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 05:58 am
no, no swimming. they just stayed in the house. The carpets have been clean and no signs of fleas and the vet didn't see any signs of ear mites...
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 06:43 am
Go to vet. Vet identify organisms in ear. Vet look at dog skin. Vet maybe discuss with you common occurence of environmental allergies in Labrador retriever breed. Vet prescribe appropriate medications. Vet recommend good ear cleaner for home use.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:10 am
As Patiodog said - get thee to a vet. Untreated ear infections can lead to the dog going deaf. The medicine is cheap. Our bulldog sometimes gets ear infections and I recall a bottle of the solution cost about $12 and it's easy to apply.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:13 am
@patiodog,
pdawg - they've already been to the vet (it's in the post before yours).

Sounds like the vet didn't give the advice you're suggesting the vet might - which is why the poster came here with a question.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 03:13 pm
@labmix26,
Dogs, with ears like a Lab's, are succesptible to such infections. I am not a vet and I don't know this for certain but I think it has to do with the internal construction of their "flappy" ears (another unintended consequence of imposed breeding).

Note canine ancestors like the wolf and fox have ears that stand up straight from their heads.

There is an ointment you can get from your Vet (Otiox I think its called) that will clear the infection up if you stick to the regimen long enough.

You can help prevent future infections by regularly clearning your dog's ears with q-tips dipped in warm salt water or vinegar. Obviously be gentle and don't stick the q-tip all the way up the canal.

0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:51 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
pdawg - they've already been to the vet (it's in the post before yours).

Sounds like the vet didn't give the advice you're suggesting the vet might - which is why the poster came here with a question.


My bad. Read the post wrong. Where I live and work, 999 times out of 1000 a dog with ear problems will not have ear mites -- I read that bit as being part of carpets cleaned and no signs of fleas. Not knowing what has or has not been done or looked at, all I can offer is that I wouldn't recommend owning labs and going to a veterinarian who doesn't pay real attention to dermatologic problems, which includes bad ears...
patiodog
 
  3  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 07:57 pm
@patiodog,
MarVista has a pretty good presentation for the owner on the subject (as they frequently do):

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_ear_infections.html


I can't say I recommend sticking swabs into dogs' (or cats', or rabbits') ears. The anatomy of the ear canal makes cleaning by this method ineffective, and and the swabs can cause trauma which lead to increased inflammation and increased opportunity for secondary infection.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jan, 2010 01:49 pm
@patiodog,
Good site

I've used the q-tip method for years with good effect and no harm to my dogs.

You need to be gentle and focused.

But you advice is not unreasonable, as some may be hamfisted with their approach.
patiodog
 
  3  
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2010 07:29 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
In a healthy ear, you're probably not going to do any harm (though you are likely to pack some of the wax down into the horizontal ear canal rather than remove it). In an infected ear, it doesn't take much to start tearing tissue.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2010 03:59 pm
@patiodog,
Perhaps, but my experience tells me it's a good way to go.
patiodog
 
  3  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2010 05:26 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
So long as it works for you. It's just something I do for a living.
patiodog
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Jan, 2010 07:16 pm
@patiodog,
Which sounds snarky, but it ain't meant to be. Just that, if I have to choose a blanket recommendation regarding dog and cat ears, it's to forego the Q-tips, because they can make a bad ear fractionally worse. And even on an anesthetized animal, I haven't found them especially useful for getting the wax that's packed deep in the ear canal. Some mineral oil and a bulb syringe, on the other hand, can work wonders (or get you bitten).
0 Replies
 
 

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