14
   

Not coming to Australia now :(

 
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 09:16 am
Disgusting....

http://www.ndtv.com/news/india/govt_to_issue_travel_advisory_against_australia.php
 
Seed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 04:23 pm
@the prince,
Well duh, I'm not there Prince. Why would you want to go there if I'm not there?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 06:38 pm
@the prince,
Good morning, prince.

Yes, yet another knifing in Melbourne is absolutely disgusting, I agree with you. I have no intention of be an apologist for Australians on this, but I honestly think the Indian government is overreacting. May I say a few things to put this in some sort of context? (Being a local & all.)

I have no idea (nor does anyone else) what the motive for this particular knifing/killing was. We won't know for certain until the police have completed their investigations. Possibly it was racist, on the part of abhorrent thuggish yobs. Or maybe it wasn't. On the same night that young Indian-Australian man was killed in West Footscray, another non-Indian man was also knifed (but thankfully didn't die of his wounds) in Fitzroy. That knifing received far less media space here & probably didn't receive any attention at all in India.

Knives have become the weapon of choice of young men (in particular) here. We've seen quite a deal of serious damage done as a result. It's a big problem, let me tell you. There has been much very vocal public disquiet about this, along with demands for far better policing in the "known" areas that these youths congregate & cause problems. Those calls appear to have fallen on deaf ears with the authorities here, who seem more interested in rationalizing spending on government services than anything else. Sigh. I recall last year, when Indian students staged a protest in the city centre about what they perceived to racist attacks on them (& there had been a number of serious attacks) the public reaction was: maybe this international attention to this problem will finally force the government to take this problem seriously? They say they have, but what we've seen since doesn't appear to be nearly adequate. Largely PR exercises, from what I can gauge.

Another aspect to this: Melbourne is a big, multicultural city. Growing fast. Too fast, many of us believe (population of over 3 million & growing like topsy), because this is causing huge strains on natural & other resources.
(don't let me get side-tracked on this. I have a huge bee in my bonnet about it! Wink ) Anyway, one of the biggest contributors to the recent surge in population growth has been a huge influx of international students. One of the largest sources of revenue in Melbourne/Australia now & nowhere near as regulated as it should be. Exploitation of these students has been rife. (another side issue I have a bee in my bonnet about!) Indian students have been a major component of this recent surge in population numbers. What I'm trying to say, in my round-about way, is that there are now many, many more Indians in Melbourne/ Australia (many of them are now permanent residents, or are in the process of becoming so). They are a lot more of them on our streets than say, about 5 years ago.

(If you're still reading, thanks you for your patience. I'm getting there! Wink )
What I'm trying to say here, is that we are just as concerned about the increasing level of knifings/violence that has occurred on our streets. It is extremely worrying & the governments response has been nowhere near adequate. Indians have just been a part of it. A much bigger part of it as there are so many more Indians here now. (You rarely hear of youth gang shootings . Or racially motivated shootings. It's always knives & bashings.)

I've tried to address your concerns by putting them into some sort of local context, prince. I would really like to discuss this further & in more detail. It's a subject that that's very important to me.

msolga
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 06:45 pm
@msolga,
Two letter to The AGE on this subject this morning. Interestingly, both from Indian-Australians:

Quote:
A double standard

INDIA'S External Affairs Minister S. M. Krishna advocates drastic measures if attacks on Indians are not stopped. This is, at worst, mischievous, as hooligans in India do not need encouragement to burn properties of perceived enemies.

Mr Krishna's Government has done nothing of note to curb attacks on foreigners in India, particularly Goa. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown recently warned British tourists after yet another murder there.

Published figures show that in 2006, 111 Britons died of natural and unnatural causes in India. In Goa alone in 2007, 40 Britons died; in 2008, 50 died there. Often the blame is put on the so-called ''bad behaviour'' of foreigners in indulging in alcohol, drugs and late-night parties. Indian politicians should clean up their backyard first before educating others.

Sampath Kumar, Mornington



Action, not excuses


THE Indian Government should not resort to hyperbole and sabre-rattling in pandering to its constituents' demands. However, it is equally incumbent on thinking Australians to refrain from a knee-jerk presentation of India's horrendous crime or sectarian violence record as a justification or excuse to sit on our hands.

The progressive degeneration of law and order in Melbourne is an issue that the Victorian and Australian governments need to tackle. No amount of finger-pointing at India will resolve it. Instead, the momentum generated by the Indian media, student organisations and protests should be harnessed by local pressure groups to demand better policing of our streets.

Yashdeep Srivastava, Brunswick East


http://www.theage.com.au/national/letters/water-companies-are-the-winners-20100105-ls8b.html
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 07:03 pm
@msolga,
For your interest. Coverage from today's AGE of this issue. Various links to related articles & video included.
Me, I wish there was as much action as talk!:


Avoid hysteria, Crean urges
BRIDIE SMITH, SELMA MILOVANOVIC AND JONATHAN PEARLMAN
January 6, 2010/the AGE


ACTING Foreign Minister Simon Crean has urged Indian leaders not to fuel hysteria over the killing of a student in Melbourne, after India's External Affairs Minister called the stabbing a ''heinous crime on humanity''.

Mr Crean said there was no evidence the attack was racially motivated, saying it was one of a spate of stabbings in Melbourne over the Christmas period.


Quote:
''It so happens that one of the victims is Indian … Melbourne is not the only city in the world where this happens. It also happens in Delhi and in Mumbai,'' Mr Crean said.
Australian Minister for Trade Simon Crean in India, September 2, 2009.

Australian Minister for Trade Simon Crean in India, September 2, 2009. Photo: Graham Crouch

''It's an unfortunate fact of life, but so far as the victim is concerned and his parents, our deepest sympathy for them and we're doing everything we can to track down the perpetrators.''

Asked about comments by his Indian counterpart S.M. Krishna - who urged Australia to respond to the ''uncivilised brutal attack on innocent Indians'' - Mr Crean said he hoped ''wiser heads will prevail''.

Nitin Garg, 21, was stabbed on his way to work at a Hungry Jack's restaurant in West Footscray on Saturday night.

The killing has sparked renewed debate in India about the safety of Australia.

Mr Garg's uncle, Raj Kumar, said the Australian Government had failed to safeguard his nephew. ''Every time we were assured by your ministry . . they were protecting Indians, but they have failed in protecting Indians,'' Mr Kumar said.

Mr Crean conceded there could be economic repercussions from publicity in India over recent attacks, although it was not clear that a fall-off in applications from international students was related.

''We have been through this type of issue before … and from the Prime Minister down we have been talking with our Indian partners and reassuring them that this country doesn't condone nor do we believe that these are racially based attacks.''

Acting Premier Rob Hulls called on the Indian Government to show restraint in its response to the killing. Asked about suggestions India might issue warnings against travel to Australia, and especially Melbourne, Mr Hulls said: ''People should just show some restraint and allow the police to get on with the job of investigating this callous crime.''

Federal Opposition Leader Tony Abbott said the attacks did not appear to be racist. ''I think it is a human tendency to see sinister aspects of things,'' he said. ''Obviously there's something horrible about any murder but I don't think we should readily conclude just because the victim is of a particular ethnic group that there is that racism unless there is some fairly strong evidence.''

Aman Singh, a family friend who had known the victim for six years, said Mr Garg had just completed his studies at Central Queensland University's Melbourne campus and was looking for a job in accounting when he was killed.

''He came here to get a good education,'' Mr Singh said. ''He would study, stay at home and spend time with his friends. He never did anything suspicious.''

His older brother Hanish had visited him in Melbourne just before Christmas. ''His brother and mother are distressed. His father died last year,'' said Mr Singh, a Melbourne resident who will take Mr Garg's body back to India.

The State Emergency Service yesterday conducted a line search of Cruickshank Park in Kingsville where Mr Garg was killed. This came after about 75 people attended a candlelight vigil at the park on Monday night. The ceremony was organised by the Footscray Church of Christ.

With PAUL AUSTIN, AAP



msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 07:14 pm
@msolga,
As I said in one of my previous posts, I'd really welcome further discussion on this subject. Even sticky questions you might want to ask. I'm sure other Oz A2Kers would feel likewise.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 07:39 pm
Quote:


Canberra has been in damage-control mode for months " to little effect. Hundreds of students took to the streets of Sydney and Melbourne again on Sept. 3 to protest not just the earlier attacks but substandard private colleges and courses that market to South Asian students, as well as poor-quality housing, exploitative work conditions and the need for local benefits like travel concession cards which, they say, will improve safety. The protests were timed to coincide with Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard's trip to India at the start of September, in which she aimed to calm the diplomatic waters, and a Senate inquiry into the welfare of international students. More demonstrations are likely when students head to the capital to air their grievances at an international student roundtable hosted by the government in Canberra on Sept. 14 and 15.

The attacks have sparked wide-ranging discussions on racism and discrimination in Australia, a nation still raw from the 2005 Cronulla race riots where thousands of Anglo-Australians engaged in violent clashes with Australian youth of Middle Eastern appearance at a well-known beach in Sydney's south. The country is also grappling with an upsurge of ultra-nationalism among some younger Australians. The issue facing South Asian students is far larger than a few isolated " and possibly opportunistic " attacks, says Unni, the Sydney coordinator of the Federation of Indian Students of Australia. The far bigger problem, he says, is the long-term systemic neglect of the welfare of foreign students in Australia, with too many students being treated as cash cows by indifferent government authorities and unscrupulous private-college operators.



Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1921482,00.html#ixzz0bn9kIMY9


this is a real problem that has been going on for some time. In my opinion Australians are so proud of themselves for their idiotic apologizes and money transfers to the Aborigines that they can't come to terms with the fact that they are some of the most racist people around.

Very rude people when traveling too, the rest of the world is predisposed to believe the worst about Australians based upon how badly Australian tourists act.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 08:14 pm
@hawkeye10,
Well that's you're opinion, hawkeye. I don't agree with your glib conclusions, though.

I genuinely believe that Australians have made a pretty good fist of constant migration from a wide variety of different countries. I also believe there are racist yobs everywhere & you can't brand a whole nation (any nation) of automatically sharing their anti-social attitudes.

Quote:
The attacks have sparked wide-ranging discussions on racism and discrimination in Australia, a nation still raw from the 2005 Cronulla race riots where thousands of Anglo-Australians engaged in violent clashes with Australian youth of Middle Eastern appearance at a well-known beach in Sydney's south. The country is also grappling with an upsurge of ultra-nationalism among some younger Australians. The issue facing South Asian students is far larger than a few isolated " and possibly opportunistic " attacks, says Unni, the Sydney coordinator of the Federation of Indian Students of Australia. The far bigger problem, he says, is the long-term systemic neglect of the welfare of foreign students in Australia, with too many students being treated as cash cows by indifferent government authorities and unscrupulous private-college operators.


I agree with much (not all) of this. There has been a widespread discussion about racism in the broad community. That's very positive, I think.
There has been a huge influx of foreign students in recent years & yes, they have been exploited. But, by the same token, involvement in & payment for studies are often used as the first stage, a stepping stone for citizenship. (The notion of payment for citizenship is a pretty abhorrent concept to me. I'm not at all happy with the "citizenship industry".) There has been lot of exploitation. There are dubious, unregulated bogus courses. There are dubious, exploitative "education providers" (whose sole purpose appears to be quick financial gain, catering for the "citizenship industry". There are "migration agents" (often foreign nationals) making a hefty financial killing out of these students We have state & federal governments who have turned a blind eye, seeing these students merely as a huge source of revenue. I think it's Australia's number one revenue earner now. If not, close. There are many Australians who are very unhappy about many aspects of all this. So many aspects of the foreign "student industry" are very cynical & exploitative.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 09:54 pm
@msolga,
From ABC Radio Nationaal on AM this morning:

http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2009/s2786293.htm
Quote:

Expert declares Melbourne safe
Simon Lauder reported this story on Wednesday, January 6, 2010 08:08:00

Listen to MP3 of this story ( minutes)
ALTERNATE WMA VERSION | MP3 DOWNLOAD
TONY EASTLEY: A spokesman for Acting Foreign Minister Simon Crean says the advisories for Indian students travelling to Australia are a matter for the Indian Government. He added that Melbourne has one of the lowest homicide rates in the world.

The Victorian Government says it doesn't want to respond to the Indian Government statement which singles out Melbourne as a street-crime hotspot.

A spokesman says it's a sensitive topic and the State Government doesn't want to add to what's already been said.

A criminologist says the way authorities have handled the reports of assaults on Indian students may have invited the extra scrutiny of Melbourne.

Dr Darren Palmer from Deakin University told AM's Simon Lauder the claims in the Indian Government's statement can't be verified.

DARREN PALMER: The level of detail which they've gone into in their analysis in the warning seems to be rather unusual and the findings, if you like, are questionable, at least in terms of the lack of detailed knowledge we have about trends in violent attacks against Indians in Australia.

SIMON LAUDER: Is there any evidence that the number of robberies and assaults in Melbourne has been on the rise in recent months as the statement says?

DARREN PALMER: No, there's not really that kind of strong evidence there and the kind of data that's collected is poor in terms of being able to identify racial indicators. Most Australian police forces do not record the race of the victims and offenders.

SIMON LAUDER: What are the dangers of putting out such a statement if the evidence isn't there to support the claims?

DARREN PALMER: I think you can do two things. One, it can cause unnecessary panic that you actually overstating the risk to such an extent that people dramatically change their behaviours, whether it's people wanting to come here as students or whether it's people who are here and how they behave.

On the other hand I guess there's a more basic message to it that people have to potentially change their behaviours in terms of protecting against victimisation. But you're on a dangerous path down there where you actually can start to blame the victims for the victimisation. So you've got a, if you like, tread very cautiously and not unnecessarily provoke fear.

SIMON LAUDER: The advice says that Indian students in Australia shouldn't travel alone at night, they shouldn't carry more cash than necessary and they shouldn't make it obvious that they're in possession of expensive items. Is there any evidence that particular ethnic groups flash around their wealth more than others?

DARREN PALMER: Again, I mean the evidence isn't there that these things in particular are making Indians victims for those kinds of behaviours. And again, I think if they are saying these things, they are kind of blaming the victim and it's not unique to Indians.

SIMON LAUDER: Is the fact that Melbourne has been singled out in this warning partly the fault of authorities here in Australia for making it about Melbourne and defending Melbourne in the first place rather than just tackling the issue?

DARREN PALMER: Yes. In relation to the latest case there was a quick attempt to come out and, if you like, defend Melbourne and Victoria and Australia's reputation and in a way that ups the ante. That puts it on the international stage automatically.

TONY EASTLEY: Criminologist Dr Darren Palmer from Deakin University speaking there with Simon Lauder.


I guess the question is, are Indians being attacked or harassed in numbers beyond the percentage you would expect from their share of the population?

The speaker there says race of offenders and victims isn't recorded by Victoria Police, which would seem to make such an analysis pretty difficult?

It's easy to be hysterical about these things, by the same token, I can see why people are so upset.

I think some of the Indian reaction is kind of over the top at present.....witness Prince's response....it's not like Australians said they wouldn't visit India after the Australian man and his kids were burned to death in their car by Hindu extremists....but I think the government's basically defensive response is not very helpful.

I guess there is an assumption that the murders were committed by Anglo Australians? Or at least by non-Indian people? I wonder if there is any evidence of this?

As for the advice about not carrying large amounts of money etc....I don't do those things (not that I HAVE large amounts of money to carry) myself as basic safety precautions.














msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 10:19 pm
@dlowan,
Some interesting questions you pose, Deb. I've been trying to find actual up-to-date statistics on recent Indian migration to Melbourne & Oz .. also those percentages regarding the numbers of Indian attacks compared to "other" (sometimes including other ethnic groups) attacks. Hard stuff to track down.

I genuinely think we (in Melbourne, anyway) would like a lot more honesty, or straight-forwardness, from the authorities on what's been happening.

Too often, they tread very, very cautiously. I can understanding not wanting to inflame potentially volatile situations (& I'm not sure the situation is quite so potentially explosive ), but I'd suggest the usual muted responses appear to be motivated by a desire to protect the city's reputation, PR ... so as not to discourage potential international students from coming here. Maybe I'm overly cynical about this, but at times the potential loss of revenue seems to override far more important concerns, particularly safety issues (for Indian students, as well as everyone else.)
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 10:45 pm
@msolga,
I think it's hard to compare racism between countries.

I'd consider China and Japan (from direct experience) to be way more racist than Oz.

But, they aren't encouraging large influxes of extremely racially diverse immigrants! Nor foreign students in droves...though China has lots from places like Africa, or so ESL teacher friends in China have told me, who not infrequently are attacked or even killed, which the Chinese government tries to keep secret. Or so friends working there have told me...I don't know how accurate this is.

If I went by my friends, I'd say Oz is pretty low on the racism scale....but I know from years of client contact, and from being involved in anti-racist political activity, that there are lots of extremely racist, or at least xenophobic, people here.

As I think I said last time Prince did a thread about this, that racism is not at all restricted to Anglo Australians...there is lots of nasty stuff from one lot of Middle Eastern or African group towards another, just as two examples.

Overall, I'd agree hesitantly that we're not doing too badly given the massive influx of racially diverse groups.....but I think there's a big goddamn racist underbelly here. I'd not be at all surprised if there is targeting of certain groups by young thugs. I have no idea why Indians might be singled out, though????? I know Indians and Chinese get targeted a lot in the SE Asian and Pacific region....largely, I'd thought,because they tend to be very successful economically....but I'd not have thought that a factor in Oz yet?????

Perhaps it is? What do you think?

The numbers of Chinese and Indian/Australian doctors, for instance, is quite striking

Do we "pride ourselves" on not being racist? I certainly don't.


You're at the coal face re racism in the school yard, Msolga. Be interesting to hear what you think about that.








dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 10:48 pm
@dlowan,
Here's Prince's last thread on the same topic

http://able2know.org/topic/132932-1


Prolly repeating ourselves!

Seems the issue continues to be of real concern, though.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:18 pm
@dlowan,
Quote:
Do we "pride ourselves" on not being racist? I certainly don't.


Well I do! Very Happy

And if we don't pride ourselves, then we should, I think! (This is not just a reaction to the recent ugly press in the Indian media, either.)

I think it's a pretty remarkable achievement to have so many different people (with regular new arrivals), often from radically different cultures, living side by side in relative harmony, most of the time. I think it was first John Pilger (Oz /Brit journalist), who brought this pretty obvious truth (once I thought about it) to my attention. But I do worry, at the moment, about the rate of new arrivals, in such a short time. And into particular communities. I'm hoping that this doesn't cause stresses & strains we've managed to avoid till now.

I agree with you that many Asian countries (which constantly berate Australians for the "racist attitudes") are in fact, far more inclusive, less tolerant of racial differences. They also don't face the same challenges of integration.

You mentioned the schools I've worked in Deb. (Say nothing of the community where I actually live.) Incredible mixture of cultures! One day last year, in a moment of boredom or something at a schoool where I was teaching, we decided to work out how many different nationalities were actually in that room at the one time - those who were born elsewhere .... We counted up to 15 ... Turks, Somalis, the Philippines, Lebanese, Iraqi, Iranian, Italian, Greek, Ukrainian (me), Indian, Pakistani, Sudanese ... god, I forget the rest! I think there were 2 people in the room who were actually born in Australia. But none of us were beating each other up! Very Happy Wink But, of course, not all suburbs are like this. But it is not at all uncommon in the inner, northern & western suburbs of Melbourne for such a diversity of cultures to coexist.

I don't want to create the impression that there's no racial conflict at all, ever .. because that's not true. Some of the newly conscious, Oz patriot flag waving nationalists are quite revolting. And I've seen quite a bit of inter-ethnic strife, like between the Croats & the Serbs, during their conflict. The only time I have felt unsettled & uncomfortable at a school was straight after 9/11 while I was teaching at a school with an overwhelmingly middle eastern/Lebanese student population. That was the only time I can honestly recall having any serious reservations about multiculturalism.

dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:30 pm
@msolga,
Very interesting.

Maybe I am too down on Oz? But I hate nationalism so much, I do try to maintain a very critical attitude. And I do see a lot of horrible attitudes out there.

And...I see Canada, the US, New Zealand and the UK doing similar influxes at least as well, no?

And many European countries, also....like Holland and France.

I am fascinated by the school thing.....sounds as though many are doing extremely well. Great to see!

Here is the school experience of mine that I spoke about in the last thread:

Quote:
I was at a school the other day, dealing with a little fella of South American indigenous extraction. His school is a major melting pot...lots of Africans, Aboriginal Australian kids, Middle eastern kids etc etc.

One of his crimes was racist taunts against some Indian children....which he had got into with his Aboriginal mates.

Then he and they got into a massive rumble with a group of African kids...because tthe African kids were telling the Aboriginal kids that they weren't proper black people, they were just dirty!

Then all the boys appeared to unite to make a little Moslem refugee girl's life horrible by making explicit sexual statements to her (they all knew she would be especially distressed by this because she wears the veil.)


Mind you...to what extent that is racism (though my little fella, who had spent most of his life in Arab countries, had certainly been subjected to lots of it in schools there!) and to what extent it is creative use of colour and religion where glasses, chubbiness, freckles, being bad at sport etc. would previously have been used is a whole 'nother question!




I wasn't so aware of a new nationalism...is it a big thing?


Yeccch.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:33 pm
@msolga,
Quote:
That was the only time I can honestly recall having any serious reservations about multiculturalism.



Can you talk more about this?

I am very interested.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:43 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:
I think it's hard to compare racism between countries.

I'd consider China and Japan (from direct experience) to be way more racist than Oz.


So do I, but it's a different kind of racism. More closed community than racial superiority. But definitely more racist than Australia.

Quote:
If I went by my friends, I'd say Oz is pretty low on the racism scale....but I know from years of client contact, and from being involved in anti-racist political activity, that there are lots of extremely racist, or at least xenophobic, people here.


In my own experience, aggressive white supremacy from Australia has seemed inordinate enough that I found it striking. And though I have little personal experience with it myself (I think almost every Australian I've known was a very nice person), I notice a lot of hints that this is a widespread perception of Australians.

For example, just this week I found this. It's not very useful data but it does at least show that a lot of people have that perception about Australia.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:44 pm
@dlowan,
Quote:
Maybe I am too down on Oz? But I hate nationalism so much, I do try to maintain a very critical attitude. And I do see a lot of horrible attitudes out there.


I'm not exactly crazy about rampant nationalism, as you'd know, Deb. And I have seen my share nasty, racist happenings, too. Not always instigated by "Australians", I might add. Quite a deal of it has been inter-cultural conflict, from old wars, old conflicts, in other countries. (My own parents "maintained their rage" against Russians, Poles & Jewish people, I might add. They never got over those feelings.)

My hunch is that it's the sheer variety of different cultures which make relative harmony possible here. Things could get much more difficult, I'd imagine, if most of any country's migrants where from the same culture & if they were very interested in maintaining their cultural particular identity. I really think a "melting pot", with lots of different groups, situation is far easier. (You should take a walk in my suburb!)
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:46 pm
The two men I work (one is my boss) with perpetually reinforce racial sterotypes. they continually refer to "chinks", Chinks use "jiggy jig" langauage. "Curry Munchers"phone them to offer mobile phone deals.
This company's main supplier has been owned by a man of chinese (1st gen) extraction and had recently been sold to a Chinese man who speaks no english. His son is a student in Sydney.

When i challenged the men i work with about their choice of langauge and about their views they claimed not to be racist and their comments were not inteded to be harmfull and I believe they are truthfull in that they mean no harm.
To put things into perspective one man i work with is a creationist (or at least believes the intelligent design crap). The other is so close to the gun totin' redneck deer shootin' sterotype its not funny.

I think racism is no more or less endemic in Australia than any other country in the world and is born of and ignorance fear of the unknown.

All (and I do mean all) of the attacks i have heard of that involve Indian students occor in "at risk" locations during "at risk times" of the night.
If Indian people take short cuts through lonely unlit areas, parks and back alleyways at night they should expect to be mugged or attacked the same as any person.




msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:52 pm
@dlowan,
Quote:
I wasn't so aware of a new nationalism...is it a big thing?


Yeccch.


Coronulla riot in (Sydney) 2005. Drunken thugs draped in flags.
The (fairly) newly revived Galipoli remembrances (of an incredibly stupid British war "strategy", an Oz & allies invasion of Turkey) Revised history.

That sort of thing.


msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:57 pm
@dadpad,
Quote:
I think racism is no more or less endemic in Australia than any other country in the world and is born of and ignorance fear of the unknown.


Amen to that, dp.

The more you know, the less you fear. Yes.
0 Replies
 
 

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