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64-bit CPU vs 32-bit CPU?

 
 
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 07:52 pm
Hello everyone! My first post Smile

Okay so I have a x64 CPU and i know that it processes information 2 time faster than that of a x86 CPU. My question is do i have to install 64-bit version of windows 7 to enjoy that 2x faster processing of information? or as long as i have a x64 CPU, the performance is always 2x faster than a x86 CPU regardless whether the OS is 32-bit or 64-bit?

probably a silly question Sad but your help is greatly appreciated
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 08:07 pm
@r3ptilia,
Howdy and welcomed aboard a2k! Smile

Found this page ... hope it might help.

Quote:
Now, you’re probably wondering why 64-bit operating systems are being phased in and what benefits they deliver over their 32-bit predecessors " both legitimate questions. One of the most commonly cited differences is that the 32-bit architecture has a memory access limit of 4GB (2^32 bytes). This permits you to use about 2.75-3.5GB of RAM after IO reservations are factored in.

On paper, the 64-bit architecture can address 16 exabytes of memory (2^64), or more than 4 billion times that of its precursor. Consumer editions of Windows Vista permit from 8GB to 128GB of physical memory to be accessed, depending on the version. Windows 7 bumps that up to 192GB with the Professional version and above.

Other benefits of running a 64-bit OS include enhanced security with hardware-backed DEP, Kernel Patch Protection and mandatory driver signing.

This is all just scratching the surface, but I suppose the real question should be:

Why shouldn’t you install Windows x64?

The short answer is that you should go with Windows 7 64-bit unless you’re running a system well into its antiquity where driver support is going to become an issue.


http://www.techspot.com/guides/177-windows-install-32bit-64bit/

If you have a relatively new computer then I believe its saying you should go with the Windows 7 (64 Bit version).
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2009 06:51 am
@r3ptilia,
You will not gain all of the benefits of your 64-bit processor without a 64-bit operating system.

Kinda like buying a Ferrari, and keeping it in 2nd gear.
r3ptilia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2009 08:00 am
@tsarstepan,
Thank you for the warm welcome as well as the answer Smile
But that didn't quiet answer my question. I know the benefits of 64-bit OS
0 Replies
 
r3ptilia
 
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Reply Fri 30 Oct, 2009 08:01 am
@DrewDad,
that's exactly what i want to know! Thanks
0 Replies
 
sstainba
 
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Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2009 02:08 pm
A 64-bit processor does not process "twice as fast". The "64-bit" refers to the address space and the command words that can be processed in a single step. These newer processors can process data faster than the 32-bit ones, but the reasons are not as simple as most people think.

In any case, you absolutely will need a 64 bit operating system to use any of the extended capabilities of the 64 bit processor. Applications doe not directly access the system resources - the operating system manages them and performs those tasks for the applications. If your operating system cannot supported the extended architecture, the applications will never know.

Also, simply running an application on a 64-bit machine won't guarantee it will be faster. Much of the gain is dependent on the type of application, the data being processed and HOW the program was coded.
Ragman
 
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Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2009 08:04 pm
@sstainba,
thanks ...you saved me making a call to my local software guru. I'm about to buy an 15-16in pro-level laptop replacement of my 4 yr old microtower using Win XP. Nowadays, after retiring and doing photo fulltime, I'm now considered a heavy user. I'm a 'working' photog w/ Adobe Photoshop and potentially placing a max demand of 400 Meg of RAM and with tpical every-day demand of from 12 - 50 Meg. I originally thought when I purchase this new laptop about loading WinXP Pro instead of Win 7 Premium or Pro, 64-bit .

Now, I'll definitely use Win 7 Pro., but I wonder of what use the Win 7 Ultimate version would be to me (prob'y mucho overkill).
sstainba
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 09:41 am
@Ragman,
the ultimate doesn't do much more than the others except include full-disk encryption which for most people is completely useless. i suppose if you are completely paranoid of someone stealing your laptop you could use it... but i don't see the point. personally, i have windows 7 pro x64. it's running on an i7 processor.
DrewDad
 
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Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 10:06 am
@sstainba,
Whole-disk encryption is useful for business applications where you might have confidential data on the machine.
Ragman
 
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Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 10:32 am
@DrewDad,
ty, sstainba and Drew. I won't need that level of security.
0 Replies
 
sstainba
 
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Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 10:43 am
@DrewDad,
right... my corporation requires us to use it... but we're a healthcare company with access to medical records of half the us. but at home... i don't particularly care if somene sees what's on my 'puter.
0 Replies
 
 

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