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The intelligent coffee mug

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Aug, 2009 09:33 pm
I spend lots of time heating tepid coffee. It sounds like a wonderful invention.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 12:22 am
@roger,
Aren't the Acoma people Navajo's? Might well be, I misunderstood.
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 12:37 am
Set wrote:
Is this ignorant son-of-a-bitch ever gonna shut up..


Well, "intelligent" mugs are not foofie's cup of tea..
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 01:47 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The Acoma are one of the pueblo tribes. Not Navajo, but probably have some nice kivas. The Navajo's I used to work with tell me the difference between Navajo and Apache is that the Apache talk faster. The cultures are also much more similar to each other than any of the pueblo tribes.

The language is something like Athbascan - spoken by Navajo, Apache, and one of the coastal tribes in Alaska.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 01:52 am
@roger,
That's Athapascan. And you're right -- once you get away from the Apache and the Navajo, nobody speaks an Athapascan language in the Southwest. Have to go to Alaska for the next nearest relatives.

The Acoma, Hopi and Zuni are not related to the Navajo. They're pueblo dwellers and their ancestors probably lived in the area long before the ancestors of the Apache and the Navajo showed up. Ultimately, the Pueblo people are descended from the Anasazi.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 02:02 am
Okay, thanks. (Actually, dys taught me quite well about all this - but in my age I sometimes forget a bit.)
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Aug, 2009 08:10 am
@Merry Andrew,
he Mogollon culture built larger semisubterranean structures which probably served as community ceremonial structures, or kivas. With roughly circular or D-shaped floor plans, the kivas, with ramped or stepped entrances, usually faced easterly. Perhaps all contained articles of ritual, for instance, clay effigies of humans or animals, prayer sticks of shamans, the claws of powerful animals, stone pipes for wild tobacco, colored mineral ingredients for body paints, crystals of quartz, and stones with exotic shapes. Most had central fire hearths. Some had interior storage pits. A few had parallel floor grooves, apparently formed by logs which might have provided mooring for tautly stretched animal hide foot drums.
Like the Mogollon to the east, the Hohokam occupied a geologically and ecologically diverse region. At its maximum, their range extended from the basin and range and the low desert country of northern Sonora and southern Arizona northward up the famed Mogollon Rim escarpment and onto the Colorado Plateau’s southwestern edge.
Between A. D. 1400 and 1450, the Hohokam, like puebloan peoples across the Southwest and northern Mexico, abandoned their communities. Some apparently dispersed into neighboring regions, perhaps to surviving or to newly founded pueblos. Stragglers may have remained behind, diminished in material wealth, technology and artisanship, but giving rise to the Pima and Papago peoples who greeted the Spanish entradas into southern Arizona in the sixteenth century.
0 Replies
 
Mark Per
 
  0  
Reply Fri 12 Oct, 2012 01:53 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Hello Community,

Materials to keep drinks cold or hot for longer have been around for quite a while. Now a pair of German scientists has come up with a high-tech mug they claim keeps coffee at the perfect temperature. Phase change material, a wax-like substance used in the construction materials industry that is normally used to ensure comfortable room temperatures in the summer without having to use any energy for air conditioners. PCMs also have long-term memory capabilities that make them ideal for storing computer data over extended periods of time without any need for an electrical current.

Best Regards,
Mark Per
0 Replies
 
 

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