RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 07:23 am
The birds are squawking and angry.
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 08:29 am
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:

But I am willing to pay instead of a dollar and a quarter for the bus three dollars and a quarter if two of those dollars go to energy alternatives. I would rather pay that 2 dollars per ride now rather than when we are nearing running out of energy and it skyrockets in price to 6 dollars a gallon for gas and then I have that two dollars tacked on when the price is high already, to little too late...


Rex, no one is stopping you from doing that RIGHT NOW. Everytime you hop on the bus, remember to donate 2 dollars to an alternative energy co-op. When you buy gas (I know you don't have a car) remember to donate $2 for each gallon you buy.

Get your friends to do it. Get your family to do it.

If you're serious, don't wait for the government, do it right now. I'll still stick to my contention that people generally are not serious about stopping this problem.

RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2010 09:09 pm
@maporsche,
How do these alternative energy co-op's work?
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 03:22 pm
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/06/13/national/main6577768.shtml?tag=channelMore;pop
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 04:09 pm
@RexRed,
Check out this link.

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.results&cgid=4&cuid=11&overallrtg=4&scopeid=2

Here are 30ish American charities that have at least a 4 star rating that you can donate money too on your own, anytime you like.

Here is one dedicated to cleaning the oceans (the topic of this thread)

The Clean Ocean Action group.
http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=10684
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 06:02 pm
@maporsche,
WOW, THANKS!

The links you sent give me some great ideas! Something other than the Ronald Mcdonald fund and Salvation Army to donate to Smile

In Portland Maine the city bus used to cost a dollar. The price of gas skyrocketed so they attached a 25 cent boost to the fee. When the price of fuel went down again and stabilized they raised the price to ride on the bus another quarter to bump it up to a dollar fifty. One might reason that once their fuel prices went back to the previous value that they would pass the savings on to the consumer but no, they want to get that extra quarter that you would donate to charity also... They did change the busing fleet over to natural gas, perhaps that is why the fare went up, Having a cleaner alternative I guess is worth an extra fifty cents one way. Does the price of natural gas rival that of today's oil? Isn't the govt also subsidizing the cleaner energy that they city has adopted are they being paid twice?
0 Replies
 
Khethil
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 07:14 am
There's a particularly well done three part special on the Pacific Ocean Patch linked off this thread.
RexRed
 
  0  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 02:39 pm
@Khethil,
Thanks for starting a parallel thread to mine... I might as well just drop mine even though mine is pages of my work and research started months before yours... People will do anything to avoid my threads i guess. Sorry thread is not well done...
Khethil
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 03:20 pm
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:
Thanks for starting a parallel thread to mine... I might as well just drop mine even though mine is pages of my work and research started months before yours... People will do anything to avoid my threads i guess. Sorry thread is not well done...


Mine was started on the Philosophy Forum then imported when PF was purchased by the A2K folks. The discussion, back then, didn't go very far but the linked video of a very nice documentary on the problem was what I wanted to bring folks' attention to. It's quite good

Thanks
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Jun, 2010 09:33 pm
@Khethil,
That's fine, at least I am not alone on this one Smile Thanks for the links.
0 Replies
 
Philis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2010 02:36 am
Sea Turtle caught in fishing line in the ocean. It is around his neck..
http://i221.photobucket.com/albums/dd284/Philis37/Turtles/thumbnailCAT2GOTS.jpg
RexRed
 
  2  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2010 11:44 pm
@Philis,
total sadness Sad
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jun, 2010 05:32 am
Lately I have been feeling doom. Like a turtle with my head tangled in fishing twine.
Philis
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 04:17 am
@RexRed,
Sad Neutral
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jul, 2010 01:24 pm
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/38225168#38211660
Philis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jul, 2010 11:43 pm
@RexRed,
I see, pits. Maybe in the next generation things will change. At least we are thinking about it and small steps are the beginning.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 24 Aug, 2010 07:44 pm
Interesting video on an ocean bound scientific expedition on the subject:
Quote:
Mid-cruise update from the recent Plastics at SEA: North Atlantic Expedition 2010. (Credits: Courtesy of SEA)

Scientists are trying to understand what goes on in and around floating patches of plastic debris in the world's oceans. Results from a 22 year investigation into floating plastic garbage were published this week in the journal Science. The researchers looked at the physics behind the plastic accumulation, its concentration, and biological activity in and around the debris. Interestingly, the researchers found somewhat less plastic than they anticipated. We'll talk to one of the authors of the report about the findings.

Guests

Kara Lavender Law
Oceanography Faculty Scientist
Sea Education Association
Woods Hole, Massachusetts


http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201008204
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Aug, 2010 09:58 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Interesting video on an ocean bound scientific expedition on the subject:
Quote:
Mid-cruise update from the recent Plastics at SEA: North Atlantic Expedition 2010. (Credits: Courtesy of SEA)

Scientists are trying to understand what goes on in and around floating patches of plastic debris in the world's oceans. Results from a 22 year investigation into floating plastic garbage were published this week in the journal Science. The researchers looked at the physics behind the plastic accumulation, its concentration, and biological activity in and around the debris. Interestingly, the researchers found somewhat less plastic than they anticipated. We'll talk to one of the authors of the report about the findings.

Guests

Kara Lavender Law
Oceanography Faculty Scientist
Sea Education Association
Woods Hole, Massachusetts


http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201008204


Thank you for your update and drawing attention back to this problem.

I have been wondering what to do about a local problem we are having here on the Atlantic side of the US.

Since the city of Portland Maine has started recycling much of the trash thrown away is recycled now but along with recycling I think come unforeseen consequences.

The way Portland does its recycling is they sell "blue garbage bags" so the residents of the city and surrounding municipalities have to mandatorily discard all of their trash from their residences in these blue trash bags. They are quite pricey about 6 dollars for about 6 or 8 average sized garbage bags. The money from the sales pay for the recycling operations.

The problem is I think the city took away many of these waste cans that were placed sporadically around the city fearing people would opt to throw their trash in them rather than buy the bags. Now some people just throw their trash anywhere.

I cannot believe how nasty and unconsciousness people are. The city does have mobile street sweepers than do a good job of the streets and periodically they do the sidewalks. But still there is various litter everywhere now.

People really suck. I wish the city would post on the telephone poles warnings of heavy fines for littering and place camera warnings in key trouble spots.

Also there needs to be more trash cans in park areas where people gather.

I surmise this flagrant litter now ends up in the storm drains and is dumped directly into the sea. The run off from the storm drains does not cycle through the sewerage treatment facilities. It funnels directly into the sea... I think the city should keep and maintain more trash disposal cans and post signs in spite of their efforts to get people to buy the blue bags...

I plan on writing my city council on this very matter and inquire on which days are days where citizens volunteer to clean up the beaches. I will volunteer myself for this. It will help my karma. Smile
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Aug, 2010 10:01 pm
My latest song and video edit... (trying to do my part)

0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 06:55 pm
0 Replies
 
 

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