7
   

Scientologies Founder Exposed

 
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 10:39 am
@Lightwizard,
Yes and how are you going to protect fools from themselves in every aspect of life?

0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 10:47 am
@Lightwizard,
The youtube video seem kind of pointless as it never been a secret that the e-meter is just an ohm meter that I am aware of.

In fact it is my understanding the circuit and hookup for this was given in the first Astounding magazine article on the device in some detail.

I will see if the internet have a posted copy of this first article in Astounding concerning the e-meter.
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 02:27 pm
@BillRM,
They're barely on the line of breaking the law and have been threatened with civil and criminal litigation. What are laws suppose to do but protect the public? Of course, we could do away with them entirely.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/20/May_1950_Astounding_Science_Fiction.jpg

The Wikipedia article contains excerpts from the article and the book:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dianetics
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 04:56 pm
Scatology

scat from the greek word scato and ology from the greek word logy... Smile
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 05:02 pm
@Lightwizard,
Quote:
J. W. Campbell, the editor of Astounding Science Fiction which later became, for some reason, Analog. He was the first to, uncharacteristically, hype Dianetics writing a special editorial in the magazine.


He backed some crazy stuff, though, like the Dean Drive. Not quite the 1950s version of cold fusion or the Steorn perpetual motion machine, but still...

BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 05:12 pm
@contrex,
He backed some crazy stuff, though, like the Dean Drive.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Would that had been nice if it had work however!

Something you know on it face is not going to work but you sure the hell wish you would be wrong.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 05:33 pm
In the theological circles I have traveled I have heard nothing but praise for the religion of Scientology. Their study of the scriptures is nearly unparalleled. As for Scientology as a science community I rate them with the Moonies, Raelians, Professor Dumbledore and Milly Vanilly. Smile
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 08:06 pm
@RexRed,
In the theological circles I have traveled I have heard nothing but praise for the religion of Scientology. Their study of the scriptures is nearly unparalleled.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As their idea that the earth is a prison planet for souls on a losing side of a galaxy size war, I do not see the tie in with the Christian bible off hand.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 08:12 pm
@BillRM,
Never heard that one, hmmm... Good point.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 09:19 pm
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:

Science and religion together to me seems like and oxymoron. Like Christian Science forbidding their followers to wear glasses.


Where do you come up with this stuff?

Christian Science allows its followers to wear glasses.

oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 10:29 pm
Journalistic licence please.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 12:17 am
@chai2,
The Christian Science followers that lived in the small town where I grew up here in Maine refused to allow their children to wear glasses. Their idea was that God was supposed to correct their eyes. Just as many faith based religions have instructed people with diabetes to stop taking their insulin shots with disastrous consequences of course. If God can create a tiny drop of water he can create a whole ocean right? Smile
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 08:05 am
@RexRed,
It's always been my understanding that Maine (you can't get there from here) enacted legislation banning eye-glasses in 1777.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 08:12 am
@dyslexia,
No you can't get there from here without your glasses... Smile
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 08:35 am
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:

The Christian Science followers that lived in the small town where I grew up here in Maine refused to allow their children to wear glasses. Their idea was that God was supposed to correct their eyes. Just as many faith based religions have instructed people with diabetes to stop taking their insulin shots with disastrous consequences of course. If God can create a tiny drop of water he can create a whole ocean right? Smile


well, the CS's in the small town you grew up in where cheap, ignorant, or both.

CS' allow eye glasses, as well as setting broken bones, and getting your cat down out of a tree.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 09:31 am
@chai2,
Here is a trial excerpt where a Christians Science "doctor" was on trial...

The witness also wore eye glasses, and when the attorney asked the witness what the defendant has said about that, he replied:

A. The defendant said I should have more faith and understanding. That I should have more courage, that I should remove the glasses...

Q. What did he say when you told him that - that you would have to keep them? Did he say anything?

A. He said if I wanted to be cured by Christian Science, I must remove the glasses.


http://books.google.com/books?id=FfKpE_1Q79EC&pg=PA70&lpg=PA70&dq=Christian+science+eyeglasses&source=bl&ots=v50Kuy9Kja&sig=qaFyV9gm_Ug9mxcfebh6E3ZtdN0&hl=en&ei=Vuh-Sq2ZLKiRtgfpgrSCAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9#v=onepage&q=Christian%20science%20eyeglasses&f=true
0 Replies
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 10:21 am
@contrex,
He later quietly and privately backed off of Dianetics, seeing that it was spawning a cult religion. Campbell was the champion for many scientific theories and the most famous besides Dianetics, which turned our more negative than positive, was the Cleve Cartmill affair(from Answers.com):

Cleve Cartmill (1908 " 1964) was an American author who specialized in writing science fiction short stories. He is best remembered for what is sometimes referred to as "the Cleve Cartmill affair",[1][2] when his 1944 story Deadline attracted the attention of the FBI due to its detailed description of a nuclear weapon similar to that being developed by the highly classified Manhattan Project.

Before embarking on his career as a writer for pulp magazines, Cartmill had a number of jobs including newspaperman, radio operator and accountant, as well as a short spell at the American Radium Products Company.[3] Many of his earliest stories, from 1941 onwards, were published in John W. Campbell's magazines Unknown and Astounding Science Fiction. This was at the start of World War II, when Campbell found himself short of material because many of his regular writers were away on military service (from which Cartmill was exempt for medical reasons[2]).

In 1943, Cartmill suggested to Campbell that he could write a story about a futuristic super-bomb. Campbell liked the idea and supplied Cartmill with considerable background information, gleaned from unclassified scientific journals, on the use of Uranium-235 to make a nuclear fission device. The resulting story, "Deadline", appeared in the issue of Astounding dated March 1944, which actually appeared early in February of that year.[2] By March 8th it had come to the attention of the Counter-Intelligence Corps, who saw many similarities between the technical details in the story and the research currently being undertaken in great secrecy at Los Alamos. Fearing a security breach, the FBI began an investigation into Cartmill, Campbell and some of their acquaintances (including Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein). It appears that the authorities eventually accepted the explanation that all the story's material had been gleaned from unclassified sources, but as a precautionary measure they requested that Campbell should not publish any further stories about nuclear technology for the remainder of the war.[2]

Historical interest aside, "Deadline" is not one of Cartmill's best stories, being described by Robert Silverberg as "a klutzy clunker"[2] and by Cartmill himself as "that stinker".[4] According to Silverberg, Cartmill also used the phrase "it stinks" when describing the story to a postman who was acting as an informer for military intelligence.[3]

Apart from the "Deadline" incident, Cartmill's writing career was undistinguished but competent. In his book A Requiem for Astounding, Alva Rogers expresses the opinion that "Cartmill wrote with an easy and colloquial fluidity that made his stories eminently readable".[4] Outside his writing career Cartmill was likely best known, at the time, for being the co-inventor of the Blackmill system of high speed typography.

His son, Matt Cartmill, is a Professor of Biological Anthropology at Boston University and a science writer[5] to whom Robert A Heinlein partly dedicated his 1947 book Rocketship Galileo[6].
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 01:45 pm
@Lightwizard,
Thanks for that blurb LW. It took me back to a time when my family had a subscription to Edmund science catalogs. I recall the catalogs had high powered telescopes costing thousands of dollars sold along side of xray eyeglasses and hovercrafts. Smile
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 02:33 pm
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:

Science and religion together to me seems like and oxymoron.
Like Christian Science forbidding their followers to wear glasses.
Do u claim that happened ?





`
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Aug, 2009 02:38 pm

Back in the 1960s, L Ron Hubbard 's son
disclosed on radio that his dad was once having lunch with a pal,
and thay discussed the best way to get rich. His father said that
the best way was to found a religion. His alleged religion
thereafter began.
0 Replies
 
 

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