7
   

Scientologies Founder Exposed

 
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 02:21 pm
I have read about celebrity members of the Church of Scientology, are there any non-celebrity members????
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 02:26 pm
@glitterbag,
I have read about celebrity members of the Church of Scientology, are there any non-celebrity members????
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You got to be kidding me the cult is fairly large as cults go and most members are money making slaves to the cult in fact if not in name.

The stupid stars are just the icing on the top of the cult.
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 03:27 pm
@BillRM,
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/87/Astounding_November_1949.jpg

"Who Goes There" is a classic and he wrote some good serious sci-fi under the pseudonym Don A. Stuart, a play on words of his first wife's name Donna A. Stuart. He took it to publish himself in Astounding. Astounding. He was a character. I've related the story before, but I got stuck in an elevator and the WesterCon sci-fi convention, with Anthony Boucher
and Richard Matheson. He broke out a flask of good cognac and we sipped, waiting for the elevator to be fixed -- it was about ten minutes to half-an-hour but by that time I was nearly choking on his cigar smoke (he was a chain smoker). He believed that Dianetics was going to supplant Fruedian psychology and win L. Ron Hubbard the Nobel Prize. Astounding!

There may have been a core of truth in the "discovery," used by, among others, the inventors of Bio Feedback (which does work).

"Who Goes There" is an absorbing read, the first to approach aliens who could morph into many forms of life and now exploited in movie after movie, TV series after TV series, mostly as a plot gimmick.
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 03:36 pm
@BillRM,
http://la.curbed.com/uploads/2009.07.scienbigss.jpg

They don't have headquarter like the LA building just for celebrities, although they have a "Celebrity Center."

It's a pyramid scheme of money making where members bring in new members but spiritually it's more like a Ponzi scheme. It's results are suppose to be like Bio Feedback, but extremely more expensive.

Note the phony baloney cross on the top which, I guess, is additional confirmation to the US government that they are a bonafide religion (which they aren't).
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 05:28 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Phoenix32890 wrote:

Quote:
This is supposed to be news?


Remember, not everyone on this forum is as, er.................mature as we are. They may not understand the background of this nonsense!


And so this thread is to be lauded for its educational value?

Thus far, there has not been a single defender of Scientology participating.

I guess there's nothing all that wrong with a bunch of people sharing their thoughts and knowledge tidbits about the sun being the center of the solar system either.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 06:57 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
A co-worker of mine many years ago was trying to get others co-workers involved with the scientology cult and I printed out a numbers of copies of the fisher papers. and share them around. In any case I think that was the name of the paper listing the secret of the cult and it levels.

This gentleman was annoy at me and I am fairly sure my name is listed as a results in some data base of their as a minor WOG.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 07:01 pm
@Lightwizard,
There may have been a core of truth in the "discovery," used by, among others, the inventors of Bio Feedback (which does work).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The e meter is an ohm meter and I hear they sell the top of the line e-meters for over 10,000 dollars.

The first e-meter was suppose to had been two tin cans hook to an ohm meter that you held in your hands.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 07:03 pm
@Lightwizard,
Lightwizard wrote:
Note the phony baloney cross on the top which, I guess, is additional confirmation to the US government that they are a bonafide religion (which they aren't).

I thought they gained church status with the IRS after Hubbard's death.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 02:21 am
@DrewDad,
It is my understanding that the cult went the religion/church route mainly because of problems with the FDA and their health claims for the e-meter and not so must because of the tax situation.

The founder was already at that time far beyond the IRS reach on his floating freighter/yacht.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 03:44 am
Just examine the word "dianetics", Who just makes up a word that doesn't mean anything to explain the secrets of life? Cybernetics, phonetics, genetics... Obviously the entire religions is based upon replacing words the have been emaciated by religion with words that have no association to religion but have new found religious meanings.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 04:24 am
Set sorry i snapped at you it was a knee jerk reaction. Thanks for adding to the discussion friend.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 07:42 am
@RexRed,
replacing words the have been emaciated by religion with words that have no association to religion but have new found religious meanings.
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To be fair to this cult their story line and what they believe in is not one bit more silly then any of the main spring fatihs
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 07:45 am
@BillRM,
Just as silly but with different words so it is more misleading. Why not call it what it is... religion. It is certainly not science.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 07:51 am
Scientology is no different than the Roman Catholics, Methodists, Pentecostals, Mormons etc... They just mislead people into thinking they are by using newfangled words to disguise their true nature.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 08:19 am
@RexRed,
Well they are in fact doing a little bait and switch in getting people into the door by first offering treatment for mental health matters using a new "science" and then going into the religion alien/prison planet for souls nonsense latter on, however most people are now aware of this I would think.
0 Replies
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 09:17 am
@BillRM,
I knew the owner/doctors who developed bio feedback -- that's completely wrong information. Your over-simplification is ridiculous and the equipments is available to the public for less than $ 200.00. However, the clinics involve a psychologist and are probably recommended. The CEO of Bio Feedback's better half worked for me in Laguna Beach and I worked for one of the original doctor's roommate in San Clemente for several years. The commercial equipment is considerably less than $ 10,000.00, costing a fraction of the medical equipment used for laser and photo lith treatments by dermatologists and plastic surgeons.
0 Replies
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 09:20 am
@DrewDad,
Yes, but they have been fighting all along to retain that status -- it's in danger in several countries including the Us and Great Britain. The bad press doesn't help but they have a ton of money and manage to squelch a lot of bad information about them.
0 Replies
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 09:21 am
@BillRM,
What does bio feed back have to do with Scientology? Answer: nothing.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 09:51 am
@Lightwizard,
What does bio feed back have to do with Scientology? Answer: nothing.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

You was the one I belief that post on this thread first concerning bio-feedback at least I was not the one to do so!

Second the e-meters used in sessions to clear people in scientology is indeed a simple ohm meter and little else and the church sell them for a way over price mark-ups and they are consider a religion object so the FDA can not question them under the medical devices laws.

Now what is your problem with the above information?
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 10:10 am
@BillRM,
No problem with that, but you linked it to the "e meter," which is about as different as a giraffe from a aardvark -- the e meter gimmick is a snake oil salesman trick to get people to pay over $ 400.00 for the sessions to "cure" them. It's in trouble also all over the world with laws allowing it as a "religious device." It's a marketing device. Then it gets into training those who have spent thousands of dollars for the bogus treatments to go out an recruit other suckers.

If the laws were correct and in the public interest, these jokers would all be in jail as quacks.

 

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