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Scientologies Founder Exposed

 
 
RexRed
 
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:27 am
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article6740831.ece
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 5,802 • Replies: 73
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:31 am
@RexRed,
L Ron Hubbard a sham? Wow and noone would have ever guessed.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:41 am
@dyslexia,
Ditto Smile

Google seems to have a love affair with plugging scientology's new add campaign all over the net.
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:44 am
He invented that church to avoid paying income tax.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  2  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:45 am
Mr. P. was a sci-fi fan, long before Hubbard invented Scientology. He tells me of an article he had read, decades ago, where Hubbard declared that the way to get rich was to start your own religion.

Problem is, that people took him seriously!
Rolling Eyes
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:49 am
@Phoenix32890,
well, he did get rich.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 11:58 am
This is supposed to be news?
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:00 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Exactly. Many people think that Hubbard never expected anyone to take his "religion" seriously. It was intended more as a joke than anything else. But there's no accounting for the gullibility of religious nuts (and/or opportunists).
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:01 pm
Science and religion together to me seems like and oxymoron. Like Christian Science forbidding their followers to wear glasses.
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:02 pm
@Setanta,
Actually no, but it is worth another chuckle very now and then.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:07 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
This is supposed to be news?


Remember, not everyone on this forum is as, er.................mature as we are. They may not understand the background of this nonsense!
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:09 pm
@Phoenix32890,
yeah, we have to allow a certain tolerance, there are also ayn rand believers here.
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:12 pm
Has anyone clicked the Google add on Scientology just to see what it said? Not me...
0 Replies
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:32 pm
@Setanta,
Right -- it's old news but doesn't seem to have any effect on the organization's (cult) popularity. I've been unmasking the dubious Mr. Hubbard for years having met him in the 50's and having a personal connection to J. W. Campbell, the editor of Astounding Science Fiction which later became, for some reason, Analog. He was the first to, uncharacteristically, hype Dianetics writing a special editorial in the magazine. Yet, Campbell was also the author of a lot of forgettable space opera before he gave it up and became an editor.

roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:42 pm
@Lightwizard,
Yet, the non religious section of Christian Science Monitor is one of the better papers in the country.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 12:50 pm
@Lightwizard,
First some of John Campbell work was first class such as "Who Go There" but most were on the light side that I agree with you.

He was one hell of an editor however and was a giant in that field for a many decades.

Hubbard was a second class to high third class author who hit the lottery with scientology.

Now given what Christians buy into his nonsense is no worst or no better then a three in one god and a virgin birth.

Humans have the ability to believe all kind of nonsense.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 01:30 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Merry Andrew wrote:
Many people think that Hubbard never expected anyone to take his "religion" seriously.

Yup. I think he considered it a fantastic joke. Social satire at full reach, poking fun at both religion and government.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 01:42 pm
@DrewDad,
For a joke his willingness to frame a former member for bomb threats etc and other not so nice actions under his watch, seem to show his sense of humor was lacking.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 02:12 pm
@BillRM,
Not lacking, Bill, just a little bizarre, a tad sadistic perhaps.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Aug, 2009 02:19 pm
@Merry Andrew,
If this had been you Merry Andrew see how bizarre you would think his actions happen to be.

http://cosmedia.freewinds.cx/media/articles/grn090280.html
Sect framed journalist over 'bomb threats'
by David Beresford, The Guardian, 9 February 1980
Transcribed by Raymond Hill
In the third of a series on the Church of Scientology, David Beresford describes the Campaigns of revenge by the 'dirty tricks' section aimed at the movement's critics
ON MAY 19, 1973, a New York journalist, Paulette Cooper, was indicted before a federal grand jury on charges of sending bomb threats to the Church of Scientology.
In October 1973, in a legal move born of desperation, Ms Cooper agreed to take a truth serum test to prove her innocence. It worked and the state shelved the charges.
Four years later Ms Cooper was telephoned at her Manhattan apartment by the FBI. They had seized documents from the Church of Scientology and had learned that she had been framed by the sect over the bomb threats and had been the victim of a carefully planned operation aimed at driving her insane or having her gaoled.
Ms Cooper qualified as a target of Scientology's dirty tricks operations because had been an uncompromising critic of Scientology since December 1969, when her first article on the followers of L. Ron Hubbard was published by a British women's magazine. The holder of a master's degree in psychology, Ms Cooper had written a book about the sect. The Scandal of Scientology, published in 1971.
The seized Scientology documents show that in the course of their campaign of vilification against Ms Cooper the Scientologists:
1. Framed her on the bomb-threat charges, stealing stationery from her apartment to forge the threatening letter.
2. Sued her 14 times, at one stage themselves importing copies of her book to the UK to take advantage of Britain's notoriously tough libel laws.
3. Put her name on pornographic mailing lists.
4. Stole a legal note from her lawyer to gain an advantage in litigation.
5. Made spurious allegations to the internal revenue service about her father's tax affairs.
6. Sent agents to befriend her date her and spy on her.
7. Wrote graffiti in public places giving her telephone number and address.
The seized Scientology documents have now been placed on public record in Washington.
Over the past two days the Guardian has published aspects of the documentation showing how the sect ran an internal intelligence service, which used dirty tricks techniques, under the control of senior executives at their international headquarters in Britain.
One of the Washington documents is a 10-page memorandum, headed Operation Freakout and dated April 1, 1976. It shows other plans to frame Ms Cooper on bomb-threat charges.
The memo declares, as its main target: "To get PC (Paulette Cooper) incarcerated in a mental institution or gaol, or at least to hit her so hard that she drops her attacks."
The memo sets out four "channels" (lines of attack) to be used against the author, who is Jewish and has a sister living in Israel.
The first line of attack was to make a telephone call to two Arab consulates in New York. The memo says that the caller should sound like Ms Cooper and instructs that her conversation should go as follows:
"I just got back from Israel (pronounced the way it is pronounced in Israel) I've just seen what you ******* bastards do. At least you're not going to kill my sister. I can get away with anything. I'm going to bomb you bastards. Say something in Jewish/swear or mumble something Jewish."
The second line of attack on Ms Cooper under "Operation Freakout" was to be the composition of an anonymous letter to an Arab consulate, saying: "All of you are destroying Israel. You're just like them. My sister loved you bastards. I was there"I saw the wonderful people. Nobody can touch me. I'm going to kill you bastards. I am going to bomb you. Kissinger is a traitor. I'll bomb him to (sic)."
The third line of attack was to create an incident in a laundry near Ms Cooper's flat. A Scientology agent, disguised as Ms Cooper, was to enter the laundry. The memo instructs that she is to act very confused.
"Says I'm PC (Paulette Cooper). Do I have any clothes here? Clerk says no. FSM (field staff member, a covert Scientology agent) demands clerk checks. Clerk comes back. Says no again. FSM screams: "You're crazy, my name is PC, check again! When the clerk says no or whatever he does, FSM goes PTS3 (a Scientology term for acting crazy).
"You're one of them! I'll kill you. You're a dirty Arab, You ******* bastards. I'll bomb you, I'll bomb the Arabs. I'll bomb the president. I'll kill that traitor Kissinger. You're all against me."
The memo adds that at this stage, if a piece of Ms Cooper's clothing is available, it should be dropped on the floor of the laundry and the Scientology agent should leave, escaping in a getaway car around the corner. A call was then to be made to the FBI, reporting what had happened in the laundry.
The Washington documentation shows that over the years regular reports on the progress of the campaigns against Ms Cooper were made by the Scientology intelligence service in America to the sect's headquarters at East Grinstead, Sussex.





 

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