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High Triglycerides

 
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 03:57 pm
@littlek,
My wife wanted some yogurt (it's her birthday today), so we went to the yogurt place where you fill your own tub with as many flavors you want. I added coconut to mine, and sprinkled a little walnut chips.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 04:09 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
Almond milk for ice cream, I wonder... that might be nice.


Not sure - it doesn't have a very high fat content I don't think. One of Mr.Irish's favorites is ice-cream I make with MimicCreme - a dairy-free product that's made from almonds and cashews.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 04:21 pm
@Irishk,
Never heard of it... learning something new again.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 04:47 pm
@Irishk,
I just bought MimiCream! I haven't used it yet.....
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 05:36 pm
@littlek,
Hope you like it. I love the packaging and keep a few cartons in the pantry since it's so versatile. Good for pies, gravies, sauces, custards...just about anything that calls for cream. Don't be put off by the slightly off color....although I was a little surprised when I opened that first carton lol.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 07:05 pm
@Irishk,
It doesn't whip, by any chance, does it?
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 07:35 pm
@littlek,
No. They make HealthyTop that whips, though. Haven't tried it yet.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 09:44 pm
@Irishk,
thanks!
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 10:04 pm
@littlek,
Quote:
I just bought MimiCream! I haven't used it yet.....
You might want to reconsider spending all that money for something that removes the benefits of dairy fat.

Quote:
Reuters Health) - Eating dairy foods could help protect your heart, new research from Sweden suggests.

Dairy foods are a major source of saturated fat in the diet, which has been associated with heart disease. However, there's some evidence that dairy foods could actually benefit heart health, for example by lowering blood pressure or reducing cholesterol levels, Dr. Eva Warensjo of Uppsala University and her colleagues note in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

To get a clearer sense of people's intake of fat from dairy and heart disease risk, Warensjo and her team measured blood levels of two biomarkers of milk fat in 444 heart attack patients and 556 healthy controls. The substances, pentadecanoic acid and heptadecanoic acid, indicate how much dairy fat a person has been eating.

The researchers found that people with the highest levels of milk fat biomarkers, suggesting they consumed the most dairy fat, were actually at lower risk of heart attack; for women, the risk was reduced by 26 percent,
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6572RL20100608

When are people going to wise up and realize that science has very little clue what foods are good for us and which are bad for us? They change their minds constantly, which should tell you something.

The latest change is coffee, today it is good for you, the darker roast the better. I would not consider stopping eating stuff I like with out science being consistent that it is bad for 20 years. There are very few things that meet this condition.

I think the change before that was that eggs are now good for you again.

The one they are looking to go to next is that a high carb diet (subbing fats and animal protein with grains) is bad for you. It seems that it totally screws up our metabolism, but they have not quite made up their minds yet.

0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 10:27 pm
Quote:
People who ate the most full-fat dairy had a 69% lower risk of cardiovascular death than those who ate the least. Otherwise stated, people who mostly avoided dairy or consumed low-fat dairy had more than three times the risk of dying of coronary heart disease or stroke than people who ate the most full-fat diary.

Contrary to popular belief, full-fat dairy, including milk, butter and cheese, has never been convincingly linked to cardiovascular disease. In fact, it has rather consistently been linked to a lower risk, particularly for stroke. What has been linked to cardiovascular disease is milk fat's replacement, margarine. In the Rotterdam study, high vitamin K2 intake was linked to a lower risk of fatal heart attack, aortic calcification and all-cause mortality. Most of the K2 came from full-fat cheese. In my opinion, artisanal cheese and butter made from pasture-fed milk are the ultimate dairy foods.

From a 2005 literature review on milk and cardiovascular disease in the EJCN:

In total, 10 studies were identified. Their results show a high degree of consistency in the reported risk for heart disease and stroke, all but one study suggesting a relative risk of less than one in subjects with the highest intakes of milk.

...the studies, taken together, suggest that milk drinking may be associated with a small but worthwhile reduction in heart disease and stroke risk.

...All the cohort studies in the present review had, however, been set up at times when reduced-fat milks were unavailable, or scarce.
The fat is where the vitamins A, K2, E and D are. The fat is where the medium-chain triglycerides, butyric acid and omega-3 fatty acids are. The fat is where the conjugated linoleic acid is. So the next time someone admonishes you to reduce your dairy fat intake, what are you going to tell them??
http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2010/04/full-fat-dairy-for-cardiovascular.html
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Sep, 2010 02:44 pm
Er..... I eat plenty of dairy. Also, it was suggested by my doctor to eat more saturated fat.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Sep, 2010 03:17 pm
@littlek,
OK, maybe I missed something in this thread then.......why do you want fake cream?
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  2  
Reply Sun 5 Sep, 2010 07:16 pm
Because of a lactose intolerance
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Sep, 2010 07:25 pm
There is dairy fat and dairy fat. Alas, I can ill afford the good stuff. Please don't lecture, I mean I can't afford it, not a matter of discernment. Fix the non affordability if you want to do something.

I did live in Humboldt county, which was replete at the time with dairy cattle in pastures, in the small area the farms could make it.

(Hey, I started a lard thread, don't yell at me.)
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Sep, 2010 07:37 pm
@littlek,
That seems very odd, considering that cream is relatively low in lactose.

Quote:
Chocolate Milk 1 cup 11
Cottage cheese, creamed ½ cup 3
Cottage cheese, uncreamed ½ cup 2
Cream, light ½ cup 4
Cream cheese 1 ounce 1
Evaporated Milk 1 cup 24
Half-and-Half ½ cup 5
Ice cream ½ cup 6
Ice milk ½ cup 9
Margarine 1 tsp trace
Milk (nonfat, 1%, 2%, whole) 1 cup 11
Nonfat Dry Milk Powder (unreconstituted) 1 cup 62
Sherbet, orange ½ cup 2
Sour Cream ½ cup 4
Sweetened Condensed Milk, undiluted 1 cup 40
Whipping Cream ½ cup 3
Yogurt, low-fat 1 cup 5
https://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/digestive-health/nutrition/LactoseContent.pdf

In light of the recent study that showed that a huge number of people who think that they are lactose intolerant prove upon examination to not be, and your desire to avoid a low lactose dairy product and sub it for a fake product that does not deliver the same benefits, you might consider stepping back at taking another look at your situation.

Regardless of what works for you I wish you good eating and good health.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Sep, 2010 09:40 pm
@hawkeye10,
Interesting.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Sep, 2010 01:20 pm
@littlek,
Hormones - whether absorbed with food or generated by the organism - accumulate in fat cells. Fat cells can multiply and can swell - but after the animal (incl. human, of course) crosses into morbid obesity the overloaded fat cells burst, releasing all those accumulated hormones and other toxins into the bloodstream. Try to avoid US full-fat milk products - with all 59 chemicals we inject into our pitiful animals, who have been turned into chemical factories. As have we, of course. EU and ANZ full-fat milk products are perfectly safe.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2010 11:36 am
@littlek,
Friends are coming for dinner tonight and since one is lactose-intolerant, I made Betty Crocker's Impossible Coconut Pie, substituting MimicCreme for the amount of milk that's called for in the recipe. In place of the 1/4 C. butter, I used coconut oil. Smells so good! If my HealthyTop gets here today (I ordered it online), I'll whip some up for a topping, but it looks fine the way it is - just like Betty's lol.
0 Replies
 
 

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