36
   

Daylight Savings??? What a Crock!!!

 
 
Ticomaya
 
  3  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 07:18 am
http://i.imgur.com/9NPXI7l.jpg
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Sat 18 Mar, 2017 01:52 pm
@Ticomaya,
Yes, but if you don't protect your head it will fry your brain ...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Mar, 2017 02:55 pm
@Ticomaya,
That reminds me of driving through both Navajo and Hopi areas in AZ ...
0 Replies
 
madscientist phil
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Mar, 2018 09:16 am
To be fair I haven’t been aware it is such an issue and creates so much confusion in the world. As I’ve only lived in Europe (CET and WET) I cannot comment on the other time zones affected by this DST effect. I understand it is such an issue partly because it’s not global in observance, and many regions do it at their own at different times of the year Sad what a mess it must be!

I am a very frugal person and do love any savings (especially of food, fuel and energy) but that is not my argument – nowadays the difference is negligible, if any at all. Despite the negatives, I still see DST as a benefit, mainly because it gives us the “extra hour”, so to speak, of sunlight in the summer, which is the comes at a cost we pay for all this. Admittedly, some may argue this is purely due to my bias being located at the “beginning” i.e. eastern part of the time zone, (meaning early sunset, and also early sunrise thus no real long summer nights, which is, I believe, something we all like) and I do accept their point. Even now with DST in place, I personally would opt for the time zone to the east, as I do not believe sunset at half 8 is a long summer night at all! Consequently, sunrise at or before 4 is pretty useless, considering most people do not wake up until 6 or 7. This being said, canceling DST would mean end of longer summers. Comparably, sunset before 4pm in winter is also pretty depressing, due to restoration to “normal time”, whose duration in a year is, paradoxically, shorter than DST in this region. Canceling DST and keeping the usual zone would be no benefit for winter, however for summer period would mean darkness relatively very very early, and no benefit of having sunrise at around 3 am when most are sleeping! The compromise is something we have now, though in my opinion it is still biased towards being an early rise and thus an early snooze.
On the other hand I can also imagine those at the western extremities of a time zone (using CET as an example, France and especially Spain) already have enough long summers and do not need the extra hour in the evening. They may be the ones who are welcoming the idea of return to normal time, as darkness after 9 in the morning is not practical. No surprise then, people in countries like PL, CZ and SK are habituated to getting up early; schools start much earlier, shops open earlier than in countries in the western extremity of the time zone, such as FR, where the 9-19h is the more common time, or Spain, who are stereotyped for their supposed “late lunches and dinners”. The irony is that even within one time zone, each country or region adapts. Then, DST should not make much relative difference across regions which already have adapted – the issue rests with the one-hour-per-year shift to sacrifice losing this hour in early spring in order for a gain of “late summers”, and to gain it back in autumn to avoid “dark mornings”. A possible solution could be to split the zone into west and east, but it would result in messing up the convened times which have existed for so long.
Ideally speaking, we should be located and clocks adjusted so that we are able to make most of our daylight when up and active, but that is just impossible as we are all governed by “official clock time”. Fixed work times, transport schedules, office opening hours do not change suddenly per minute change caused by slight difference on the earth’s surface. Some may argue that we were designed to be awake during daylight and sleep at night, but given humanity is spread all over the globe where the extremities between day and night become more accentuated, this is just impossible… and we have learned to adapt (some more easily than others) to the seasons changing. Besides, spending half day sleeping is not really what we need as grown-ups, and with increasing age, time spent sleeping decreases.
If it were possible that regions which do not benefit so much – e.g. are closer to equator would not observe DST over time if no benefit seen, but others such as Europe do, I am in for such an agreement Smile
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Thu 22 Mar, 2018 07:45 pm
@madscientist phil,
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 26 Aug, 2020 05:42 pm

https://i.imgur.com/xM8VjEl.jpg
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2022 03:45 pm

Senate passes bill that would make Daylight Saving Time permanent
(cnn)
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2022 03:52 pm
@Region Philbis,
We're still one and a bit weeks away.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2022 04:10 pm
@Region Philbis,
A horrible idea, in my opinion. <ducking for cover>
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2022 10:20 pm
@hightor,
Best idea! Let it be daylight savings time all the time. Actually, we did vote for it here in California, but nothing happened. I hope it's a done deal once and for all!
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2022 03:54 am
@CalamityJane,
People in northern latitudes – above 40º– are much more affected by shortened hours of light in the winter. If you're on the extreme eastern edge of a timezone and want to have evening light this light is robbed from the light you would have received in the morning. Currently, during deep winter, the sun rises around 7 and sets around 4. All year-round DST would do is change the sunrise to 8 and sunset to 5. This means that kids wait for the school bus in the dark. Personally, I'm an early riser and like to get as much work done as early as possible during the day. I don't understand why setting and resetting the clocks twice a year is such an issue.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2022 03:59 am
We were on double BST during the war. Whenever we're about to go back to GMT and the subject of remaining on BST all year round comes up there is someone from the Highlands of Scotland complaining about how bloody dark it is with Greenwich.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Mar, 2022 06:09 am
Daylight Saving Is a Trap

When people say they like the time change, what they really mean is that they like summer.

Quote:
This week, the “Sunshine Protection Act” passed the Senate. The bill, which would make daylight saving time permanent, is popular with the public; people hate switching their clocks back and forth. And who doesn’t like sunlight?

But daylight saving time isn’t good for us. It’s an artificial jump forward from standard time, which is more aligned with the path of the sun. (At noon during standard time, the sun is actually at its highest point in the sky.) Our bodies evolved, over millions of years, to be exquisitely attuned to the sun’s rhythm. When we wake and see sunlight in the morning, it trips off a cascade of chemicals in our brains that coordinate mental and physical health. Morning sunlight (even through the clouds on a winter day) is vital.

Shifting our clocks every March so that many of us have to wake up before sunrise takes a toll. We can move the hands on a clock, but we can’t fool the body. The shift raises stress levels and inflammation, shortens our sleep, and increases depression. In the week after daylight saving time begins, the incidence of heart attacks and strokes goes up significantly. A recent study found a 6 percent rise in fatal car crashes in that same period.

Daylight saving time is particularly dangerous for teenagers, who are already struggling to stay in sync with the sun. Teens have a natural delay in their biological clock. This phenomenon is seen across cultures—and even across species—and may be evolution’s way of giving teenagers more independence. Their melatonin—the drowsiness hormone—rises later in the evening, prompting them to go to sleep later and wake up later than the rest of us. Too-early high-school start times already make healthy sleep difficult for teens, given this natural delay. The darker it is in the morning and the sunnier it is later in the day, the harder it is for them to get to bed on time. The result is shortened sleep, an increase in accidents, and a higher risk of depression.

Modern-day adolescents are already the most sleep-deprived population in human history. By their senior year, high-school kids on average are getting six and a half hours a night, when they should be getting eight to 10. Teen sleep has been on the decline for decades, and now, one in five teens sleeps five or fewer hours a night. There is a notion that teenagers can get by skimping on sleep, but it turns out the opposite is true: Sleep becomes more vital in the teen years as kids go through drastic developmental changes in the brain and body.

A sleep-deprived brain is slower to react and makes more mistakes. It also skews toward sadness and anger. Recently, the surgeon general outlined his concerns over a growing mental-health crisis, citing higher levels of depression and anxiety among young people: “In 2019, one in three high school students and half of female students reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness”—an increase of 40 percent from 2009. The reasons for deteriorating mental health are complex, but sleep loss and a chronic struggle to stay in sync with daytime schedules are big factors. One study found that kids who were sleep-deprived were three times as likely to have symptoms of depression. A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that for kids ages 11 to 14, sleep was one of the top predictors of positive mood and protectors against anxiety and depression during the pandemic.

Daylight saving time is already unhealthy. You might have the sense that just adapting to it permanently would be better, because we would soon get over that immediate sense of jet lag, but that’s not the case. We’re unaligned with the sun all season long, even if most of us aren’t consciously bothered by it. The big reason daylight saving time never seems so bad is that the shift happens when the days are getting longer. When people say they like it, what they really mean is that they like summer.

But daylight saving does not actually add sunlight to the equation (despite what politicians are saying). If the House passes this bill and it becomes law, we’ll face very long, very dark mornings every winter. In some areas of the country—especially those in the westernmost part of each time zone—the sun won’t rise until 9. Teenagers will feel like they’re waking up for school in the middle of the night and will take calculus exams under fluorescent lights without ever seeing morning sun. They’ll miss most of their REM sleep, or dream sleep, which happens in the early-morning hours and is essential to mental health.

This is clearly a bad idea. So why is it happening, besides the appeal of the bill’s sunny name? Maybe influential business groups like the idea that, with an extra hour of evening sunlight, people will drive more and spend more. But what we actually need to do is sleep more.

If the bill does pass, we’ll need to protect teenagers. We could, for instance, move school-start times to 10—but just try bringing that up at your next school-board meeting. Fortunately, a much better solution exists, one that preserves morning sunlight in the winter without forcing us all to fiddle with our clocks twice a year. We could just do that once more this November, and then stick with standard time.

Standard time is nothing fancy; it’s just the natural way. Why not make it permanent instead? Our bodies already want to follow the sun. Our clocks should do the same.

[urlhttps://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/03/daylight-saving-time-bad-teenagers/627095/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=atlantic-daily-newsletter&utm_content=20220318&utm_term=The%20Atlantic%20Daily]atlantic[/url]
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Mar, 2022 06:29 am
@hightor,
[url]Standard time is nothing fancy; it’s just the natural way. [/url]That certainly depends on where you live.

For example, here in Europe, Central European Time (CET) is solar time in eastern Germany and eastern Austria.
Central European Time (CET) is based on solar time at 15° eastern longitude. This longitude runs roughly parallel to the border between Germany and Poland. There, therefore, normal time - depending on the time of year - coincides fairly exactly with solar time, with the sun reaching its highest point at around 12 noon.

East of the longitude, for example in Vienna, the clocks lag behind the true local time by a few minutes. West of there, however, i.e. in large parts of Germany as well as in Switzerland and western areas of Austria, the clocks show a noticeably later time than that given by the course of the sun.

Quote:
people hate switching their clocks back and forth. And who doesn’t like sunlight?

However, the deviation becomes much more drastic during the summertime period. Then our clocks are oriented to solar time at 30° eastern longitude. This longitude crosses Ukraine and eastern Belarus, for example.

However, year-round daylight saving time would be particularly problematic during the winter months, as the sun rises late then anyway. In Berlin, sunrise at the end of December is currently at 8:17 a.m. CET - with daylight saving time, the sun would not appear until 9:17.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Mar, 2022 06:32 am
Since I had to change quite a few clocks from Alpha to Zulu Time when I was in the navy (any time we were "at sea") I'm still kind of used to it.
0 Replies
 
 

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