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different types of painting from home,Sydney,

 
 
Nits
 
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 05:29 pm
I stay in Sydney..I do different types of paintings such as oil ,glass,charcoal,etc..Most of my friends who see ask me to start selling or put them in exhibitions..I really do not know where to start it from..Can some body guide me? I would also like to know if I can start taking art classes in any schools or collegues..I do not hold any bachelors or masters degree in Arts.

Thanks
Nits
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 2,773 • Replies: 12
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margo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 07:56 pm
I can't advise you on selling your artworks, I'm afraid.

But there are a squillion art schools:
One of the most famous, longstanding: Julian Ashton Art School
http://www.julianashtonartschool.com.au/
National Art School - in the old Darlinghurst Gaol:
http://www.nas.edu.au/

google "art schools sydney" - and see lots more.

Less expensively - there are different art courses in the community colleges around town.

And welcome to A2K!

Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 07:58 pm
@margo,
Oh.... Ossobucco has a mind of information and ideas about these things... maybe she will be along in a bit. Good luck to you - don't give up - believe in what you do.

Wlecome to A2K Very Happy
Nits
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Feb, 2009 03:08 pm
@margo,
thanx for that info margo
0 Replies
 
Nits
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Feb, 2009 03:09 pm
@Izzie,
Than q
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Feb, 2009 05:21 pm
@Nits,
I'm from California, which has different ways for people to start selling their art - and many types of school; also, many artists are self taught.
There are private galleries of different sorts. There are municipal galleries of different sorts, some of which have open entry shows which may or may not be juried for entry. There are art-in-the-park type shows, where you set up a booth and try to sell your wares. Sometimes people form artist groups and have group shows in different venues; one such group I know has every person in the group work on the same theme for a show. People now have their own websites and sell through them. Sometimes they join websites that do the selling for you, for a fee.

On schools, we have everything from local high schools that have night classes (or they used to) in such things as beginning spanish and beginning art. There are community colleges, which can have some good teachers, and I think it is possible to just take one class. The are colleges devoted to the arts. There are universities with art majors and graduate art departments. Some of those universities have extensions which have art classes at night for adults.
I may be forgetting something obvious, just typing as I think of things.

I suggest you start looking around at galleries and simply ask advice if the gallery people are friendly.

I've had a couple of galleries, many years apart. We talked to people who walked in off the street, but weren't always able to look at the art right then, as we also had other work to do. For years, people preferred a set of good slides of one's work in preferences to photos - we didn't care. We never gave someone a show without seeing the work in person, either by appointment with the person bring the work to the gallery, or our going to the person's studio or home. At the time I was with my last gallery, we primarily did one person shows, with the person's work filling a large room; work from other artists associated with the gallery were also shown in the rooms further back. But, many galleries do multi artist shows, especially ones that sort of combine being a gallery and a gift shop/card shop. In the last city I lived in, the whole town was pretty interested in art, and the walls of coffee shops and boutiques and beauty salons... often had some art, usually for sale. So, that is a way to start too.

So, what advice? Just talk with people..






ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Feb, 2009 05:26 pm
@ossobuco,
A short story --
one of my favorite artists is a guy who walked into our gallery with a folder with some brush drawings, most with horses - he was from Mongolia, was a tattoo artist for a living. We booked him a show, but he disappeared... luckily we bought a few ourselves the day he came in.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Feb, 2009 05:30 pm
@ossobuco,
And one more comment: always understand a gallery may not be interested in your work, or your type of art, or they may be genuinely booked for future shows - try not to take any rejection personally, learn from it. Learning how to take rejection is part of the whole thing.
0 Replies
 
Nits
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2009 04:55 pm
@ossobuco,
thank u osso..lemme figure out some new ways of selling..The idea of selling in coffee shops,salons,is also good..will try that as well...
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2009 08:05 pm
@Nits,
Let us know how it goes..
0 Replies
 
ajeetthakur
 
  0  
Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2011 10:18 pm
@ossobuco,
Middle East's biggest art market Discover opportunity in Dubai. I think you should try to sell your painting these type of markets.
0 Replies
 
jamesmith
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Feb, 2012 06:11 am
@Izzie,
Any advice about cleaning an oil painting that's covered in dust or yellowed varnish must come with a major disclaimer. More than other kinds of do-it-yourself projects, cleaning oil paintings should really be trusted to expert conservators. Furthermore, altering true antiques almost always decreases their value, whether or not they look better to you. If your painting is not that old, not terribly valuable, or not too important

Edit [Moderator]: Link removed
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Feb, 2012 06:24 am
@jamesmith,
wherever that advice came from , its a good one. Most conservators use as weak a solution of enzymes found in human saliva to do most if the clesning of old oils. The biggest things are not to "lift" the old painting from the canvas or panel.
Lastly, anything you have done in conservation should be done with the idea that the conservation materials can be removedsometime down the road.

Yellowing and darkening are results of a painting hanging in an area that had an atmosphere from the past when it was open to fieplace smoke, gas chimneys, cigars, and any cooking greases in the air. Removal is fairly straitforward with the exception of copper blues and greens which have a tendency to change over the centuries and may need touching up with more vibrant colors.

I had a painting that was done by Thomas Eakins wife, Susan, and it was all dark and had lost its vibrancy. I took it to a conservatory lab at WInterthur Musuem near Wilmington Del and they worked on it and it was amazing the background subject of people in the shadows just popped out from a dingey pall of smoke and gunk.
Cost several hundred bucks but it was worth it.
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