24
   

What is the most plausible alien movie?

 
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:07 pm
"Contact".

I think if we make contact it will probably be in the form of some mathmatical sequence.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:16 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

"Contact".

I think if we make contact it will probably be in the form of some mathmatical sequence.



Ah, that's the premise in "A For Andromeda" which I spoke of.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:17 pm
@boomerang,
That's a good candidate--although this was once again a case of a better novel than a movie, and in my never humble opinion, neither of them all that good.

To that extent, 2001, a Space Odyssey was good for exactly the same reason, that the "aliens" with whom (or which) we were dealing were not anthropomorphic, and not even perceivable as we might think we ought to be able to perceive them. The motion picture leaves you in doubt as to whether or not there has been contact with anything more than a machine, or a device.

The original story upon which it was based, The Sentinel, was a "first contact" short story by Arthur Clarke which posited a device on the surface of our moon, which, when its "force field" has been breached, sends forth a powerful signal, and then shuts down. The idea, of course, is that an intelligence has now been informed that we have become spacefarers. That was the point of departure of the motion picture, and i liked that we were never expected to believe in little green men nor horrifying monsters--but rather, to accept what we might not be capable of understanding.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:17 pm
@patiodog,
patiodog wrote:

I find order where there is none. It's probably got a classification in the DSM.

Which is not to say there are no comic and/or literary implications.


Nah...you're just ordurely
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 08:56 pm
@rosborne979,
I can't think of any particular movie, at the moment, but probably any one that had viruses, microbes, bugs, etc, in it. They're going to outlive us all!
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 10:17 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Merry Andrew wrote:

I'm not sure if it's the most plausible alien, but for me the most realistically chilling was Alien. The sets of the space-ship were certainly plausible.


I agree with Merry Andrew here.

Merry Andrew wrote:

Note to Robert G. re: Andromeda -- the book is waaaay better than the film.


I'd say that's an understatement.
... and the book is not that great, either.
Starchild
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 12:03 am
@rosborne979,
I think it is more common in tv-series like Battlestar Galcatiga, Stargate etc.
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 12:26 am
@rosborne979,
Insomnia hit last night and I watched the 13 segments of A Strain and agree the book was much better. A little too much petri dish science fiction viz a viz the silver screen.

Take the . . . A Strain . . . it will get you to Sugar Hill in Harlem ah Duke Ellington. . . . . .

I agree with you Rosbourne I think that any visitors we may have had from outer space are bacteria.










a
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 06:31 am
@fbaezer,
Quote:
Merry Andrew wrote:

Note to Robert G. re: Andromeda -- the book is waaaay better than the film.


I'd say that's an understatement.
... and the book is not that great, either.


You're right, fb. In retrospect, the book is not all that great. But I read it when it was new and was very impressed at the time mainly because, to me, it was a new kind of sci fi. I was used to reading the run-of-the-mill Heinlein and Clarke and Sturgeon stuff. The Crichton had a ring of authenticity to it. Since then, I've read a lot of Crichton's books (not all) and I like him less and less. He's really a very poor writer in terms of style. Good imagination, though.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 06:38 am
@Merry Andrew,
He's dead.

I had that trajectory with him, too.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 06:43 am
@dlowan,
I know he's dead. I used the present tense in the same sense that one speaks of Hemingway as being a macho man. He sure ain't no more.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 06:48 am
@Merry Andrew,
Was he ever? Wink
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 08:16 am
@dlowan,
Macho men are afraid of losing their penis.

Hemingway was afraid of losing his penis.

Ergo, Hemingway was a macho man.

Absolutely flawless logic, I assure you. I ran it past the boys in the State Department.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 08:51 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

That's a good candidate--although this was once again a case of a better novel than a movie, and in my never humble opinion, neither of them all that good.

To that extent, 2001, a Space Odyssey was good for exactly the same reason, that the "aliens" with whom (or which) we were dealing were not anthropomorphic, and not even perceivable as we might think we ought to be able to perceive them. The motion picture leaves you in doubt as to whether or not there has been contact with anything more than a machine, or a device.

The original story upon which it was based, The Sentinel, was a "first contact" short story by Arthur Clarke which posited a device on the surface of our moon, which, when its "force field" has been breached, sends forth a powerful signal, and then shuts down. The idea, of course, is that an intelligence has now been informed that we have become spacefarers. That was the point of departure of the motion picture, and i liked that we were never expected to believe in little green men nor horrifying monsters--but rather, to accept what we might not be capable of understanding.
Childhood's End
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 09:09 am
Mars Attacks, definately.

http://vwt.d2g.com:8081/mars_attacks.jpg
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 10:21 am
@Starchild,
Starchild wrote:
I think it is more common in tv-series like Battlestar Galcatiga, Stargate etc.

Could be. I haven't seen many of the StarGate episodes (too candy-pop for my taste).

On Battlestar Galactica the Cylons aren't really alien, they seem to have originated from the "humanoids". This is more of a "Terminator" theme where humans cause their own problems, rather than newness encroaching from the stars Smile


Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 10:59 am
Childhood's End was goofy . . . i didn't care for it.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 12:33 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Childhood's End was goofy . . . i didn't care for it.

I read Childhood's End when I was a teenager and liked it, but I don't think I would like it as much now.

The last really thought provoking Sci-Fi book I read was Singularity Sky by Charles Stross. Full of interesting ideas, and if you want to read about something really alien, you have to meet the entities/beings called "The Festival" Smile
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 01:09 pm
David Brin does one about the discovery that stars are sentient (i think it was Brin, although it may have been someone else), but it's been so long i don't remember exactly.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 01:12 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
David Brin does one about the discovery that stars are sentient (i think it was Brin, although it may have been someone else), but it's been so long i don't remember exactly.

Brin wrote Sundiver (which may be the one you are remembering). Sundiver was "ok", but not one of my favorites. My favorite Brin novel by far was StarTide Rising. Fantastic aliens in that book Smile
 

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