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fish: what kind how do i cook it?

 
 
OGIONIK
 
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 08:47 am
i ahd mahi mahi a few weeks ago and it blew me away, best thing ive eaten for a few years.

a links fine, i want somewhere with lots of simple fish recipes, emphasis on simple.

hopefully someone has there own amazing recipe they would like to share.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 10 • Views: 4,421 • Replies: 22
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 09:20 am
@OGIONIK,
I marinate and toss it on the indoor grill. Every time. Works like a charm and we love it. Sometimes I add Mrs. Dash as almost a breading, sometimes I don't. It's whatever I feel like doing.

Cooking time on the stovetop is maybe 5 minutes each side if you like rare (which I do). More for more well done, of course. I set the heat to a medium high flame.

I realize not everyone is okay with just one method, though. Like chicken, it can be baked, put into soups and stews, and stir fried. Consider what you'd do with skinless chicken breast and go from there, but recognize that the cooking times should generally be less and you'll need to watch a little more to prevent it from being overcooked.

We had mahi-mahi last weekend, and it was pretty awesome. Smile
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 11:50 am
My simpliest fish recipe is for salmon. Simply grill, broil or bake with basic seasoning (salt, pepper, Mrs Dash or something). When done pour honey on it.
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 11:55 am
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

My simpliest fish recipe is for salmon. Simply grill, broil or bake with basic seasoning (salt, pepper, Mrs Dash or something). When done pour honey on it.


Hoisin sauce is also good.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 11:58 am
@OGIONIK,
Easiest and hardest to screw up -

Bake fish in a pouch in the oven.

Take two fillets - what you'll usually get from the store - of whatever fish you like, I like salmon and red snapper.

If the fish was frozen or wet in any way, dry with a paper towel.

Cover both sides with salt and black pepper, and I like paprika as well if you have it.

Lay a few slices of lemon on top of each of the fillets - optional but good step.

Take either Aluminum foil or Parchment paper, place the fish on it.

I usually throw some veg in there, onions and bell peppers work great, hell anything will work just fine.

Fold the edges of the foil over to cover the fish and then another piece on top, or just use one big piece to begin with. Just make sure it's sealed up nice and tight on any seams.

Throw in a 375 degree oven for about oh 13-15 mins depending on the size of the fish, your oven, and how well you like them done.

This method is easy, takes little cooking experience and results in a juicy and flavorful fish. You can switch up the recipe in any way you like - sometimes I put olives in there, sometimes jalapenos, sometimes a little white wine to cover everything.

Don't overcook! Fish goes from being rare to perfect to overcooked very quickly; it's okay to take the fish out early to check it, better to do that then to leave it in even two or three minutes too long.

Enjoy. Bout as simple as it gets.

Cheers
Cycloptichorn
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 12:06 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Here's another one - tuna steaks. I get them from trader joes', not very expensive, maybe 5.99/pound which will feed 2 adults along with some veg.

Mix the above-mentioned Hoisin sauce, or if you don't have that, try ginger, lemon, crushed garlic, soy sauce, a little lemon zest (scrape off the outside of the lemon using a potato peeler) and even a little regular bbq sauce if ya like. You can vary this up to include all sorts of different flavors - don't be afraid to try whatever!

Marinade the tuna steaks in the sauce for at least 1/2 hour preferably 2 hours.

Scrape the marinade off and coat with a little salt and pepper.

Get a pan hot, and I do mean real hot, and put just a little oil in the bottom, I use Canola or Olive oil.

You want to sear the tuna, and it's cool if the inside is a little rare - so no more than 3-4 mins on the first side, and then 2-3 on the other side. Once again it's better to undercook than overcook!

When the tuna looks good, remove from pan and throw the rest of the marinade in, mix with a little bit of white wine (watch for flame-ups when doing this) and reduce it to make a glaze-y sauce. Real easy to do.

Made this recipe last weekend, was ******* killer.

Cheers
Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 12:58 pm
we have most of our fish (almost always fresh) simply panfried .
the one i like best is monkfish - it's ugly looking when whole - but the skinned fillets are about as good as scallpos or lobster when panfried - be careful not to leave in the pan for long - the flesh will get tough .
gotta get monkfish for the weekend - off to see mrs h .
hbg

ugly looking ... but good eating

http://www.dnr.state.md.us/fisheries/art2001/monkfish540.jpg

panfried monkfish
..............................
Quote:
Ingredients
100g/3oz monkfish
1 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
1 tbsp fresh chervil, chopped
1 tsp butter
For the carrot purée
200g/7oz purple carrot, cooked
55ml/2oz chicken stock
25g/1oz butter



Method
1. Melt the butter in a frying pan over a medium heat.
2. Coat the monkfish in the chopped herbs. Add to pan and cook for three minutes, turn once and cook for a further three minutes.
3. For the purée, blend the carrots in a food processor until smooth.
4. Add the chicken stock and butter to the carrot purée and stir well.
5. Transfer this mixture into a saucepan and heat until all the stock has evaporated.
6. Serve the monkfish on a plate with the carrot purée (or mashed potatoes)
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 01:00 pm
My favorite,

Talapia . It is a very light fish.. very little flavor of its own so you can make it taste how ever you want.

I like to cook it on the stove top.. SUPER LOW heat for about 15 minutes on each side.
sprinkle garlic salt on it then pour fresh lemon juice on it.

mmmmmm
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 01:03 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:

My favorite,

Talapia . It is a very light fish.. very little flavor of its own so you can make it taste how ever you want.

I like to cook it on the stove top.. SUPER LOW heat for about 15 minutes on each side.
sprinkle garlic salt on it then pour fresh lemon juice on it.

mmmmmm


Make sure you buy ocean Tilapia; farm-raised is the cheap stuff, but it contains no Omega-3 oils whatsoever, and is actually high in bad fats and quite bad for you.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
tarakesh
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2009 10:14 pm
Another Talapia recipe, and if you like mustard:

Squeeze lemon juice on both sides of the fish, let it sit for a few minutes, and then rinse it. Add salt. Lightly fry the fish in mustrd oil, adding hot mustard (as in the mustard you use for sandwiches), and sliced green chilies. Top off with cilantro (optional) and eat it with white rice.

Cycloptichorn's red snapper/ salmon recipe sounds suberb!
0 Replies
 
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jan, 2009 12:53 am
@OGIONIK,
Mahi, mahi is my favorite. Just pan broil and serve with side sauces, i.e. mango & ginger, garlic mayo & lemon. Check on line for mahi, mahi sauces.

The secret is in the sauce.
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jan, 2009 10:01 am
Being from the south, we all love fried catfish and, though certainly not health food, we do indulge in it from time to time.

Doing it quick, no nonsense, and easy:

Heat about 1/4" of olive oil or canola oil in skillet (no lid).

Deboned catfish fillets are easiest and unless quite small, we usually cut each fillet down the middle through the vein to make two pieces of each.

Dip each fillet or half fillet in very lightly seasoned (salt & pepper) milk and then roll in a flour/corn meal (roughly half of each though we go a bit heavier on the cornmeal) seasoned (salt & pepper to taste) mixture.

Fry breaded fillets quickly in hot oil until golden brown - turn once to get each side. Drain on paper towel.

A good cole slaw or finger veggies, bread n butter pickles, and hush puppies or potato salad compliment the fish.

Enjoy. Pure ambrosia for a southerner. Smile
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jan, 2009 10:42 am
@Foxfyre,
this is seriously my favorite thread ever, reading cycloptics post my mouther watered.

im gonna make another post called the food stamp gourmet here any day now.

;D

both extremely cheap,and bang for the buck kinda food.

all of it as healthy as possible tho.

on another note, i am officially level 80 on warcraft, yay!
no more boredom. this means i can focus more, honestly it does. eatin right, exercise, and i wont be bored out of my mind.

i wonder why farm tilapia doesnt have omega oils ?

hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jan, 2009 06:26 pm
@OGIONIK,
the lowly herring and sardine :

full of healthy omega-3 fat - more than any other fish .

see here :

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_4_33/ai_100732358

0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jan, 2009 06:35 pm
just plug in the word FISH to the search tag window on the right, Ogi.

Do I need to repeat my sauteed onions, mustard, and pepper thing again? No, do some research here. Look around, people have posted about fish for years here.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jan, 2009 06:41 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cyclo's fish in a pouch routine is one of my favourite options. I like to mix up the types of citrus I put in with the fish - sometimes orange, sometimes lime, I tried key lime once - it needed something to temper it, even grapefruit works.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Jan, 2009 08:51 am
@ehBeth,
I'm starting to think of doing fish in the slow cooker. Have been finding some recipes online and will adapt to the diet. I'll report back on results.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Jan, 2009 08:53 am
@jespah,
i'd be curious to read what you find out
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Jan, 2009 08:56 am
i'm a big fan of solid flesh fish, salmon and tuna, usually just grill with a little bit of ground pepper
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Jan, 2009 09:05 am
@jespah,
I have trouble thinking about fish that's been cooked for more than 10 - 20 minutes. Max.

I just bought one of those slow-cooker double packs. Big un, lil one for 'free'. Used to use slow-cookers a lot. Now I can't get my head around anything other than beef/chicken/starches done in the slow cooker. The new ones are sitting in the box, being ignored. I'll be interested in your feedback on the texture of slow-cooked fish.
 

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