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1 in 5 children have a personality disorder that interfers with everyday life

 
 
OGIONIK
 
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 01:31 am
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/12/01/1-in-5-young-adults-has-p_n_147547.html

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Share Print CommentsCHICAGO " Almost one in five young American adults has a personality disorder that interferes with everyday life, and even more abuse alcohol or drugs, researchers reported Monday in the most extensive study of its kind.

The disorders include problems such as obsessive or compulsive tendencies and anti-social behavior that can sometimes lead to violence. The study also found that fewer than 25 percent of college-aged Americans with mental problems get treatment.

One expert said personality disorders may be overdiagnosed. But others said the results were not surprising since previous, less rigorous evidence has suggested mental problems are common on college campuses and elsewhere.

Experts praised the study's scope _ face-to-face interviews about numerous disorders with more than 5,000 young people ages 19 to 25 _ and said it spotlights a problem college administrators need to address.

Study co-author Dr. Mark Olfson of Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute called the widespread lack of treatment particularly worrisome. He said it should alert not only "students and parents, but also deans and people who run college mental health services about the need to extend access to treatment."

Counting substance abuse, the study found that nearly half of young people surveyed have some sort of psychiatric condition, including students and non-students.

Personality disorders were the second most common problem behind drug or alcohol abuse as a single category. The disorders include obsessive, anti-social and paranoid behaviors that are not mere quirks but actually interfere with ordinary functioning.

The study authors noted that recent tragedies such as fatal shootings at Northern Illinois University and Virginia Tech have raised awareness about the prevalence of mental illness on college campuses.

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They also suggest that this age group might be particularly vulnerable.

"For many, young adulthood is characterized by the pursuit of greater educational opportunities and employment prospects, development of personal relationships, and for some, parenthood," the authors said. These circumstances, they said, can result in stress that triggers the start or recurrence of psychiatric problems.

The study was released Monday in Archives of General Psychiatry. It was based on interviews with 5,092 young adults in 2001 and 2002.

Olfson said it took time to analzye the data, including weighting the results to extrapolate national numbers. But the authors said the results would probably hold true today.

The study was funded with grants from the National Institutes of Health, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the New York Psychiatric Institute.

Dr. Sharon Hirsch, a University of Chicago psychiatrist not involved in the study, praised it for raising awareness about the problem and the high numbers of affected people who don't get help.

Imagine if more than 75 percent of diabetic college students didn't get treatment, Hirsch said. "Just think about what would be happening on our college campuses."

The results highlight the need for mental health services to be housed with other medical services on college campuses, to erase the stigma and make it more likely that people will seek help, she said.

In the study, trained interviewers, but not psychiatrists, questioned participants about symptoms. They used an assessment tool similar to criteria doctors use to diagnose mental illness.

Dr. Jerald Kay, a psychiatry professor at Wright State University and chairman of the American Psychiatric Association's college mental health committee, said the assessment tool is considered valid and more rigorous than self-reports of mental illness. He was not involved in the study.

Personality disorders showed up in similar numbers among both students and non-students, including the most common one, obsessive compulsive personality disorder. About 8 percent of young adults in both groups had this illness, which can include an extreme preoccupation with details, rules, orderliness and perfectionism.

Kay said the prevalence of personality disorders was higher than he would expect and questioned whether the condition might be overdiagnosed.

All good students have a touch of "obsessional" personality that helps them work hard to achieve. But that's different from an obsessional disorder that makes people inflexible and controlling and interferes with their lives, he explained.

Obsessive compulsive personality disorder differs from the better known OCD, or obsessive-compulsive disorder, which features repetitive actions such as hand-washing to avoid germs.

OCD is thought to affect about 2 percent of the general population. The study didn't examine OCD separately but grouped it with all anxiety disorders, seen in about 12 percent of college-aged people in the survey.

The overall rate of other disorders was also pretty similar among college students and non-students.

Substance abuse, including drug addiction, alcoholism and other drinking that interferes with school or work, affected nearly one-third of those in both groups.

Slightly more college students than non-students were problem drinkers _ 20 percent versus 17 percent. And slightly more non-students had drug problems _ nearly 7 percent versus 5 percent.

In both groups, about 8 percent had phobias and 7 percent had depression.

Bipolar disorder was slightly more common in non-students, affecting almost 5 percent versus about 3 percent of students
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Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 2,056 • Replies: 18
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OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 01:34 am
**** son, im definitely a wacko then, obsessive, paranoid, erratic, drugs, not lately but whatever, impulsive, all or nothing mentality,
emotionless most of the time..

yep.

Razz
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 03:01 am
Only one in five? I would'a thought much more than that. Like, at least half or more.
Woiyo9
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 07:08 am
@OGIONIK,
Personality disorder my ass.

WHen parents and teachers start disciplining children, you will be amazed how fast these disorders clear up.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 07:44 am
That personality disorder is called Adolensence.
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 08:28 am
@OGIONIK,
you consider yourself to be 'emotionless most of the time'?
I must have a totally innaccurate mental picture of you then...you seem to me to be pretty interested in a lot of things - usually very pleasant...love your dog...looking to the future....

Adolesence should be over by the time someone's nineteen - but I think you kind of nailed the problem today - this extended childhood that's become the norm. Kids are coddled and treated as dependent children well into what used to be considered adulthood.

My friend was telling me about an article he read where this college kid was allowed to have his dog in class - not because he was blind or otherwise impaired and needed a helping dog of some sort- but because his dog made him feel safer in whatever environment he was in.

I know of college-aged 'kids' (which is what they still act like) who have their mothers call them every morning to make sure they wake up to go to class.

Life must seem pretty scary to people who have been convinced they can't cope on their own - hence all these coping mechanisms -OCD- to impose control and order on their surroundings - drugs to help them escape.

There's no such thing as sink or swim anymore -not that I know anyone who's parents would really have said that - but the point is - you used to just swim - because there didn't seem to be another choice. It's really not that way anymore is it?
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 08:37 am
@Bella Dea,
****, can I spell or what? Sheesh...sorry, I meant Adolesence.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 03:43 pm
@Bella Dea,
ummm.... no you didn't, you meant adolescence..... from the Latin verb adolescere, to grow....

If you're trying to learn spelling from those 2 posters, good luck to you Smile
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 03:44 pm
@High Seas,
I give up! I am brain dead today!! Laughing
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 04:05 pm
@Bella Dea,
You've been hanging out with "the wrong element", brain-deadness is contagious Smile
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 05:19 pm
I got seven days detention because I couldn't stop doodling and drawing in science class. It was my favorite subject at the time. I always seemed a step behind catching on to instructions and how to do something than everybody else--I simply saw stuff differently than everybody else saw it. I couldn't sit still--I almost certainly would have been diagnosed ADD if there had been such a thing back then. Teachers then solved it with a rap across the knuckles though or extra study hall time. I felt out of step, out of place, wrong, stupid, unacceptable, ugly, and irresponsible at different times or occasionally at at the same time.

Later I would find that I had a lot of company that I never knew about all those years of adolescence. Every kid has his/her demons, insecurities, and fears, but we surved them, found time for some happiness and pleasures along the way, and then went on to achieve stuff that none of us even thought about way back then. (Probably surprised the hell out of a lot of our parents and teachers too.)

I wish they would stop analyzing kids so much, stop drugging kids into zombies, stop programming every second of every day of their young lives, and just let kids be kids again.

I think the world would be a healthier place.
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 05:32 pm
@Bella Dea,
Bella Dea wrote:

That personality disorder is called Adolensence.


Topped with high fructose corn syrup, sugars, chemicals in food, lack of exercise, dumbing down with TV, excessive purchasing and parents who really think their child should sit still and be quiet all the time.

Give kids some real food. Not processed crap and watch half of them become normal people.

Stop expecting things from kids that are not realistic .. like paying attention all day in school

And quit feeding their thirst with sodas and juice. Give them some water for gods sake

High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2008 06:23 pm
@shewolfnm,
So you have diagnosed the average fruit fly as having a better co-ordination (just try swatting one) and vastly superior continuity of thinking (just try keeping one away from a bowl of fruit) than our esteemed host on this thread, Ogionik?!

Your MD certification is waiting for you at the curb.
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 12:58 am
@High Seas,
sink or swim? **** nigga then i just fly.
0 Replies
 
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 01:00 am
@aidan,
aidan wrote:

you consider yourself to be 'emotionless most of the time'?
I must have a totally innaccurate mental picture of you then...you seem to me to be pretty interested in a lot of things - usually very pleasant...love your dog...looking to the future....

Adolesence should be over by the time someone's nineteen - but I think you kind of nailed the problem today - this extended childhood that's become the norm. Kids are coddled and treated as dependent children well into what used to be considered adulthood.

My friend was telling me about an article he read where this college kid was allowed to have his dog in class - not because he was blind or otherwise impaired and needed a helping dog of some sort- but because his dog made him feel safer in whatever environment he was in.

I know of college-aged 'kids' (which is what they still act like) who have their mothers call them every morning to make sure they wake up to go to class.

Life must seem pretty scary to people who have been convinced they can't cope on their own - hence all these coping mechanisms -OCD- to impose control and order on their surroundings - drugs to help them escape.

There's no such thing as sink or swim anymore -not that I know anyone who's parents would really have said that - but the point is - you used to just swim - because there didn't seem to be another choice. It's really not that way anymore is it?


i was sorta bein sarcastic...

i swear to god for reallss, i used to have ocd.

i would align everything! no matter what, then i realised one day, wtf am i doing? then i started to wean myself off of it.

i wish i could bring my fuckin dog everywhere with me, she makes me feel safer than a lockbox in a bank..
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 01:02 am
@OGIONIK,
ever notice children in other societies outside th3e western ones are treated as equals to adults? well not equals, but they will work, are trusted, arent treated like morons?

well its situational to what society, but westerners treat their children like kings.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 07:32 am
@Foxfyre,
They wanted to put me on drugs when I was little because I was "too hyper" but my mom refused. She said there was nothing wrong with me, that I was just an active kid. And I turned out ok.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 08:33 am
@OGIONIK,
Quote:
sink or swim? **** nigga then i just fly


There you go - that's the attitude you gotta have. My mom said to me one time that she didn't know why I was going to college because she knew I wouldn't finish anyway - I was like -'Why are you saying this to me?' I was a good student and everything - but I've always gotten bored easily - have moved from place to place you know- worked in all sorts of different settings - almost always doing the same sort of thing with the same sort of people - but I always need to feel stimulated and challenged and for me that always means change...but anyway - she said that and I was like (in my head) '**** nigga - you just wait and see who finishes'- and I did- just to show that I could.

Quote:
i swear to god for reallss, i used to have ocd.

i would align everything! no matter what, then i realised one day, wtf am i doing? then i started to wean myself off of it.


Yeah, I think I have a little of it too - I align everything...I also really like to sweep and vacuum and mow the lawn in straight lines - if I get a crooked line in my lawn- I'll go over it again to make it straight - stuff like that.
I'm not worried about it though- it doesn't take over my life or anything...it just makes my surroundings neat and orderly. I literally can't work in a messy kitchen. If a kitchen is messy - I have to clean it before I can start cooking (I don't mean dirty- just messy). I also can't do paperwork if my office is messy. I have to organize it first...I don't think that's bad.

Quote:
i wish i could bring my fuckin dog everywhere with me, she makes me feel safer than a lockbox in a bank..

Yeah - I wish I could bring my dog everywhere with me too - not because she makes me feel safe, but because I like her. But the point is that you can function at work and stuff without your dog, right? And the point I was making is this kids' parents were suing the school to make sure he could have his dog...well okay, but do they think everyone should be able to his or her dog at school? How would that work? Wouldn't it make more sense for their son to learn to function a little more normally?

You know I was reading your other thread about how you feel kind of stuck and it reminded me of this new book I read about by this guy named Gladwell. The title is Outliers and it's about how/why certain people succeed when others don't and he studied these people and their lives and circumstances and determined that success is due to a medley of circumstances - chance, work, luck and circumstance- but not particularly outstanding talent or genius as most people might believe, and that one of the most important components is what he calls the 10,000 hour rule and that is that if you have a passion and you devote yourself to it like 2.5 hours a day for ten years - that whatever it is you're working at- you'll become really, really competent and maybe even achieve incredible success in that area.

I've decided I'm gonna do it (either in writing or photography) and see what happens ten years from now.

I think it's all in the attitude - some people believe in the world and in themselves and no matter what the circumstances - they somehow rise above.

Some people just don't believe - and feel they'll be defeated before they even try- and they seem to sink down - no matter how far above everything they started out.

Mental illness and depression are something I'm not dealing with - so I don't know - but I can imagine it'd make it hard to feel like fighting through it every day.
But for those who don't want to fight - it seems to offer a reason not to - and it seems that more and more people are afflicted with this sort of malaise...I don't know what to attribute it to- except maybe lack of hope.

0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 10:50 am
@Merry Andrew,
Merry Andrew wrote:

Only one in five? I would'a thought much more than that. Like, at least half or more.


Didn't it use to be 4 out of 5? Seems like life for kids is improving.

I can remember when kids didn't have it so good. Remember the little 7 year old kids who had to shovel pig intestines in the Chicago Stock Yards, in order to afford a pair of cheap socks?
0 Replies
 
 

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