Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 06:29 am
@aidan,
aidan, I remember doing the same thing on a jungle gym in grade school. Those things were dangerous.

Next phase was daring to get on a ferris wheel at the carnival. I recall the thing stopping while my seat was at the top. I closed my eyes and clung to the bar hoping the operator would hurry up and get me down from there.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 06:18 pm
i was about 7 years old when i had my first taste of "operating" an automobile .
my dad's company had just purchased a "three-wheeler" and i was allowed to ride along with the driver during the summer vacation .
my "operational" responsibilities were to activate the directional "flippers" and the windshield-wipers - i was proud as punch - and hooked forever !
hbg

http://www.lkw-infos.eu/images/oldtimer/allgemein/Tempo-Hanseat-(Heppe).jpg
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 07:04 pm
When I was in the eighth grade, I was the kid who stayed by himself. I contributed nothing and spoke to no one unless spoken to first. Naturally, I only participated in sports during PE class, and usually in a token position. One day we played baseball. I don't recall my field station, but, when we came up to bat, I stepped up to the mound when it came my turn. The pitcher, brimming with confidence, zinged a strike across the plate. A bystander said, "AW, let 'im hit it." The pitcher ignored the plea. He had mayhem in his eye as he lobbed a fast ball in. To everyone's amazement, I smacked that sucker deep into center field and had a third base run. It was the one highlight in my junior high school sports career: the day I made them respect me for something.
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 07:12 pm
Carrying the tent. Drinking beer.

That's about it.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 08:53 pm
Interesting that we, who live with a culture that does not highly formal rites of passage (rituals of change) from one social identity to another--like barmitzvah (sp?), can identify relatively INFORMAL and personal ones (e.g. driving a car, first sex experience, college degrees, first haircut, long pants, etc.).
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 08:53 pm
Interesting that we, who live with a culture that does not have highly formal rites of passage (rituals of change) from one social identity to another--like barmitzvah (sp?), can identify relatively INFORMAL and personal ones (e.g. driving a car, first sex experience, college degrees, first haircut, long pants, etc.).
Foofie
 
  2  
Reply Wed 26 Nov, 2008 10:04 pm
@JLNobody,
JLNobody wrote:

Interesting that we, who live with a culture that does not have highly formal rites of passage (rituals of change) from one social identity to another--like barmitzvah (sp?), can identify relatively INFORMAL and personal ones (e.g. driving a car, first sex experience, college degrees, first haircut, long pants, etc.).


Well, there used to be a few rites of passage. When there was a draft, going in to the peacetime Army was one. Also, for boys there was often the Boy Scouts; girls had the Girl Scouts. In cities, using the public transportation alone was another.

I am guessing that many young people today just move along, from grade to grade, and rites of passage might not even be in the lexicon?

I am guessing that if this was researched, rites of passage may be an obsolete concept for the mainstream U.S. society? It almost sounds like something that might only still be part of some subcultures, but not mainstream. Or, possibly part of some ethnic cultures that are in the U.S.?

Where are the sociologists, when one needs one? (Was the "S" on Superman's outfit really for Sociologist? He did always seem to understand a situation.)
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Nov, 2008 09:35 am
Ah, a boy and his wheels. Yep, hbg, that is one ritual that is a must in a man's life.

JL, welcome back. We are not exactly talking about formal rites and rituals, buddy, and the individual expectations count just the same. but thanks for the reminder.

For those of you who might want to know, here is a review of Margaret Mead's Coming of Age in Samoa.

http://www.age-of-the-sage.org/scientist/margaret_mead.html

patiodog, one small act can create a change, buddy.

edgar, that success with a bat did make you feel more worthy, right?

foofie, hope the replies clear up your questions. Thanks for the response





0 Replies
 
Seed
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Nov, 2008 08:19 am
@edgarblythe,
It is amazing how sports can make for a level playing field in more then one way.
0 Replies
 
Seed
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Nov, 2008 08:22 am
@hamburger,
My father would kind of do the same thing with me when I was little and driving. He would place me on his lap and let me "steer" the car. Of course I thought I was the one navigating the truck, but it was really his hands doing the work. It never failed though, that when we got to where we were going, proud as I could be, I thought I had gotten everyone there with my great driving abilities.
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Nov, 2008 11:23 am
@Seed,
Where there's a wheel, there's a way, seed.

Among the American Indians ,one wasn't considered a man until they could withstand pain. Check out "A Man Called Horse."
aidan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Nov, 2008 10:31 am
@Letty,
I just had another rite of passage - I beat my friend Justin at scrabble - by only four points granted - but I WON! And he's really, really good - we've been playing for about 18 months now and I started out losing by 40 to 50 points and then I'd lose by 20 and then by 10- but I ALWAYS lost and I won the other day.

I said, 'You felt sorry for me - you let me win- didn't you?'

He swears not...
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2010 07:39 am
@Letty,
Letty wrote:

Thought that I would try a new thread in this new format to see if it works.

The very first thing that anyone in my family had to do to prove that they were brave, was to stand on our fence; jump off and catch a limb on the oak tree. When I mustered the courage to try, I did it. Wow! was I ever proud of myself.

Did you have any rites of passage in your family?


One of the greatest problems in our, Western society is that there is no true rite of passage... People get married, and ever after are considered adults... For some groups it is graduating out of juvinile court and going to penitentiary... If we all had an ordeal we had to go through to prove we were brave and reliable we could turn our backs on childhood and join the grumps and dults without regrets... Look at all the adults who collect toys they don't have time to use... Look at all the adults who give up all before the dawning of old age to have one last chance at romance....Look at me... This is like kindergarten all over again, except now I can go home when I want... Some people cannot escape the past and its inevitable charms... If that door were forever closed they would be happier and healthier...
0 Replies
 
HesDeltanCaptain
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2015 07:01 am
@Letty,
In cub scouts, we had to drink a mixture of various sauces and spices called 'buffalo blood' or some such. Even as a child I realized how arbitrary and stupid it was and steadfastly refused. So guess I'm still a kid. Smile

And to this day over 30 years later can't stand sauces and such on foods. Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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